Extragalactic Radio Sources

These and other related topics are discussed in this book.

Extragalactic Radio Sources

On the 100th anniversary of Marconi's successful experiment on radio broadcasting, 250 astronomers from all over the world met in Bologna (Italy) for five days, to update their knowledge of the physics and statistical properties of powerful extragalactic radio sources. Since their discovery in the fifties enormous progress has been made. The existence of superluminal motions in the cores of radio sources, the presence there of a black hole surrounded by an absorbing dust torus, as inferred mostly from studies at other wavelengths, are now accepted ideas. Nevertheless, in spite of these efforts, there are many questions still unanswered. For instance we do not know which mechanism produces the huge amount of energy supplied to radio sources, how the jets connecting the `engine' to the lobes are formed and collimated, which of the differences observed among the various classes of radio sources are apparent and which are real. These and other related topics are discussed in this book.

Extragalactic Radio Sources

IAU Symposium 97, Extragalactic Radio Sources, was held at Albuquerque, New Mexico August 3-7, 1981.

Extragalactic Radio Sources

IAU Symposium 97, Extragalactic Radio Sources, was held at Albuquerque, New Mexico August 3-7, 1981. It was co-sponsored by IAU Commissions 28, 40, 47 and 48 and by URSI Commission J. Financial and organizational support were provided by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the University of New Mexico, and the National Science Foundation. A wide variety of interesting objects and phenomena can be covered under the heading "Extragalactic Radio Sources", and a diverse set of topics was in fact discussed at the symposium. Radio galaxies, quasars, Seyfert galaxies and BL Lacertids received the most attention, but normal galaxies, the galactic center, and even SS433 were also discussed. While the unifying theme of the symposium was radio emission, studies at all wavelengths--X-ray, UV, optical, IR, and radio--were included. In general, the emphasis was on individual objects and the physical processes associated with them, but there were also papers on statistical studies and cosmology. The symposium was attended by 209 scientists from 18 countries.

Jets in Extragalactic Radio Sources

These proceedings present reviews and research papers on extragalactic radio sources. The book begins witha discussion of the phenomenology and models of radio sources.

Jets in Extragalactic Radio Sources

The existence of jets emanating from the central sources of radio galaxies and quasars was perhaps the most important discovery for our understanding of the nature of active galactic nuclei. These proceedings present reviews and research papers on extragalactic radio sources. The book begins witha discussion of the phenomenology and models of radio sources. The main partis devoted to detailed studies of jets by VLBI, to the information obtained about the structure of the central source as deduced from variability studies, to production, confinement and velocity of jets as well as to numerical simulations of the jet phenomenon. Reviews of the two best studied jets - those in the radio galaxy M87 and the quasar 3C273 - illustrate our current observational picture of extragalactic radio jets in all accessible wavelength ranges. A section on the influence of the environment on radio galaxies concludes the book. This topical volume addresses researchers and graduate students in astrophysics.

Extragalactic Radio Sources

The proceedings of the 7th meeting of the Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, covering the subject of extragalactic radio sources.

Extragalactic Radio Sources

The physics of active galactic nuclei, the origin of extragalactic jets and the formation of extended extragalactic radio sources are among the most interesting challenges of modern astrophysics. This book contains the proceedings of the 7th meeting of the Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, which drew together both theorists and observers in this exciting field. Recent observational data at X-ray, optical and radio wavelengths is discussed, and new theoretical developments concerning beam and jet formation models are considered. Special treatment is given to plasma physics problems related to particle acceleration, magnetic reconnection, beam-plasma interaction and coherent emission. The volume will be of use to all students and researchers who are working in this field.

The Physics of Extragalactic Radio Sources

A unique feature of the book is De Young's emphasis on the physical processes associated with extragalactic radio sources: their evolution, their environment, and their use as probes to solve other astrophysical problems.

The Physics of Extragalactic Radio Sources

Extragalactic radio sources are among the most unusual and spectacular objects in the universe, with sizes in excess of millions of light years, radiated energies over ten times those of normal galaxies, and a unique morphology. They reveal some of the most dramatic physical events ever seen and provide essential clues to the basic evolutionary tracks followed by all galaxies and groups of galaxies. In The Physics of Extragalactic Radio Sources, David De Young provides a clearly written overview of what is currently known about these objects. A unique feature of the book is De Young's emphasis on the physical processes associated with extragalactic radio sources: their evolution, their environment, and their use as probes to solve other astrophysical problems. He also makes extensive use of the large amount of data now available from observations at x-ray, optical, and radio wavelengths to illustrate his main points. The Physics of Extragalactic Radio Sources will be a comprehensive introduction to the field for graduate students and a useful summary for astrophysicists.

Clusters of Galaxies and Extragalactic Radio Sources

In the past few years, the acquisition of new data has far outstripped theoretical advances in the study of clusters of galaxies and extragalactic radio sources two important topics in contemporary astrophysics.

Clusters of Galaxies and Extragalactic Radio Sources

In the past few years, the acquisition of new data has far outstripped theoretical advances in the study of clusters of galaxies and extragalactic radio sources two important topics in contemporary astrophysics. A few of the nine papers here try to redress the balance with theoretical treatments, bu

Extragalactic Radio Sources

Extragalactic Radio Sources


Extragalactic Radio Sources

IAU Symposium 97, Extragalactic Radio Sources, was held at Albuquerque, New Mexico August 3-7, 1981.

Extragalactic Radio Sources

IAU Symposium 97, Extragalactic Radio Sources, was held at Albuquerque, New Mexico August 3-7, 1981. It was co-sponsored by IAU Commissions 28, 40, 47 and 48 and by URSI Commission J. Financial and organizational support were provided by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the University of New Mexico, and the National Science Foundation. A wide variety of interesting objects and phenomena can be covered under the heading "Extragalactic Radio Sources", and a diverse set of topics was in fact discussed at the symposium. Radio galaxies, quasars, Seyfert galaxies and BL Lacertids received the most attention, but normal galaxies, the galactic center, and even SS433 were also discussed. While the unifying theme of the symposium was radio emission, studies at all wavelengths--X-ray, UV, optical, IR, and radio--were included. In general, the emphasis was on individual objects and the physical processes associated with them, but there were also papers on statistical studies and cosmology. The symposium was attended by 209 scientists from 18 countries.