Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is a study of crowd psychology by Scottish journalist Charles Mackay.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is a study of crowd psychology by Scottish journalist Charles Mackay. The subjects of Mackay's debunking include witchcraft, alchemy, crusades, duels, economic bubbles, fortune-telling, haunted houses, the Drummer of Tedworth, the influence of politics and religion on the shapes of beards and hair, magnetizers (influence of imagination in curing disease), murder through poisoning, prophecies, popular admiration of great thieves, popular follies of great cities, and relics. Contents: Volume 1: National Delusions: The Mississippi Scheme The South Sea Bubble The Tulipomania Relics Modern Prophecies Popular Admiration for Great Thieves Influence of Politics and Religion on the Hair and Beard Duels and Ordeals The Love of the Marvellous and the Disbelief of the True Popular Follies in Great Cities Old Price Riots The Thugs, or Phansigars Volume 2: Peculiar Follies: The Crusades The Witch Mania The Slow Poisoners Haunted Houses Volume 3: Philosophical Delusions : The Alchemysts Fortune Telling The Magnetisers

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

The text concentrates on a wide variety of phenomena which had occurred over the centuries prior to this book's publication in 1841.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Charles MacKay's groundbreaking examination of a staggering variety of popular delusions, crazes and mass follies is presented here in full with no abridgements. The text concentrates on a wide variety of phenomena which had occurred over the centuries prior to this book's publication in 1841. Mackay begins by examining economic bubbles, such as the infamous Tulipomania, wherein Dutch tulips rocketed in value amid claims they could be substituted for actual currency. As we progress further, the scope of the book broadens into several more exotic fields of mass self-deception. Mackay turns his attention to the witch hunts of the 17th and 18th centuries, the practice of alchemy, the phenomena of haunted houses, the vast and varied practices of fortune telling and the search for the philosopher's stone, to name but a handful of subjects. Today, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and The Madness of Crowds is distinguished as an expansive, well-researched and somewhat eccentric work of social history.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds Complete Edition Volume 1 3

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is a study of crowd psychology by Scottish journalist Charles Mackay.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds  Complete Edition  Volume 1 3

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is a study of crowd psychology by Scottish journalist Charles Mackay. The subjects of Mackay's debunking include witchcraft, alchemy, crusades, duels, economic bubbles, fortune-telling, haunted houses, the Drummer of Tedworth, the influence of politics and religion on the shapes of beards and hair, magnetizers (influence of imagination in curing disease), murder through poisoning, prophecies, popular admiration of great thieves, popular follies of great cities, and relics. Contents: Volume 1: National Delusions: The Mississippi Scheme The South Sea Bubble The Tulipomania Relics Modern Prophecies Popular Admiration for Great Thieves Influence of Politics and Religion on the Hair and Beard Duels and Ordeals The Love of the Marvellous and the Disbelief of the True Popular Follies in Great Cities Old Price Riots The Thugs, or Phansigars Volume 2: Peculiar Follies: The Crusades The Witch Mania The Slow Poisoners Haunted Houses Volume 3: Philosophical Delusions : The Alchemysts Fortune Telling The Magnetisers

Extraordinary Popular Delusions the Madness of Crowds

This informative, funny collection encompasses a broad range of manias and deceptions, from witch burnings to the Great Crusades to the prophecies of Nostradamus.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions   the Madness of Crowds

A complete repackaging of the classic work about grand-scale madness, major schemes, and bamboozlement--and the universal human susceptibility to all three. This informative, funny collection encompasses a broad range of manias and deceptions, from witch burnings to the Great Crusades to the prophecies of Nostradamus.

Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

First published in 1841 across multiple volumes but presented here in one omnibus volume, this enlightening work explores such societal delusions and aberrations as: [ the Mississippi Scheme, in which an 18th-century Scottish financier ...

Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

In reading the history of nations, we find that, like individuals, they have their whims and their peculiarities; their seasons of excitement and recklessness, when they care not what they do. We find that whole communities suddenly fix their minds upon one object, and go mad in its pursuit... -from the Preface The satanic child-abuse mania of the 1980s. The dotcom craze of the 1990s. The housing bubble of the 2000s. It may seem like we today invented mass insanity, but it's always been with us, as this classic expose of the madness of humanity demonstrates in a way that's both disturbing and highly entertaining. First published in 1841 across multiple volumes but presented here in one omnibus volume, this enlightening work explores such societal delusions and aberrations as: [ the Mississippi Scheme, in which an 18th-century Scottish financier created a stock bubble in France for land in the New World [ the infamous tulip mania that seized Holland in the 1600s [ the grip that alchemists, with their claims of turning lead to gold, held over the European imagination during the Enlightenment [ the centuries-long Crusades of the Middle Ages [ the witch hunts that plagued both sides of the Atlantic in the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries [ and many more. A powerful study of human psychology on a cultural scale, this important work is startlingly relevant today... as it's sure to still be centuries from now. Scottish journalist CHARLES MACKAY (1814-1889) held an honorary law degree from Glasgow University, as well as a doctorate in literature. A renowned poet and songwriter, he also authored a Dictionary of Lowland Scotch.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions

Though the scope of the first edition was wide ranging--including alchemy, fortune-telling, haunted houses and other forms of philosophical delusion--the present editions reprints only those portions of the original work that pertain to ...

Extraordinary Popular Delusions

2017 Reprint of 1852 Edition. Being selections from Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds. Mackay's work, first published in 1841, chronicles the various fallacies and delusions that have afflicted human thinking during the modern period. Though the scope of the first edition was wide ranging--including alchemy, fortune-telling, haunted houses and other forms of philosophical delusion--the present editions reprints only those portions of the original work that pertain to economic bubbles. Present-day writers on economics, such as Michael Lewis and Andrew Tobias, laud Mackay's three chapters on the Tulipomania, the South Sea Bubble, and on the Mississippi Scheme.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

The personal character and career of one man are so intimately connected with the great scheme of the years 1719 and 1720, that a history of the Mississippi madness can have no fitter introduction than a sketch of the life of its great ...

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

The personal character and career of one man are so intimately connected with the great scheme of the years 1719 and 1720, that a history of the Mississippi madness can have no fitter introduction than a sketch of the life of its great author John Law. Historians are divided in opinion as to whether they should designate him a knaveor a madman. Both epithets were unsparingly applied to him in his lifetime, and while the unhappy consequences of his projects were still deeply felt. Posterity, however, has found reason to doubt the justice of the accusation, and to confess that John Law was neither knave nor madman, but one more deceived than deceiving, more sinned against than sinning.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is a study of crowd psychology by Scottish journalist Charles Mackay.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is a study of crowd psychology by Scottish journalist Charles Mackay. The subjects of Mackay's debunking include witchcraft, alchemy, crusades, duels, economic bubbles, fortune-telling, haunted houses, the Drummer of Tedworth, the influence of politics and religion on the shapes of beards and hair, magnetizers (influence of imagination in curing disease), murder through poisoning, prophecies, popular admiration of great thieves, popular follies of great cities, and relics. Contents: - Volume 1: National Delusions: - The Mississippi Scheme - The South Sea Bubble - The Tulipomania - Relics - Modern Prophecies - Popular Admiration for Great Thieves - Influence of Politics and Religion on the Hair and Beard - Duels and Ordeals - The Love of the Marvellous and the Disbelief of the True - Popular Follies in Great Cities - Old Price Riots - The Thugs, or Phansigars - Volume 2: Peculiar Follies: - The Crusades - The Witch Mania - The Slow Poisoners - Haunted Houses - Volume 3: Philosophical Delusions: - The Alchemysts - Fortune Telling - The Magnetisers

Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Reproduction of the original: Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds by Charles Mackay

Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Reproduction of the original: Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds by Charles Mackay

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds Complete and Unabridged All Three Volumes 1841 54

The book was published in three volumes: "National Delusions", "Peculiar Follies", and "Philosophical Delusions". Mackay was an accomplished teller of stories, though he wrote in a journalistic and somewhat sensational style.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds   Complete and Unabridged   All Three Volumes 1841 54

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds Complete and Unabridged All Three Volumes Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds is an early study of crowd psychology by Scottish journalist Charles Mackay, first published in 1841. The book was published in three volumes: "National Delusions", "Peculiar Follies", and "Philosophical Delusions". Mackay was an accomplished teller of stories, though he wrote in a journalistic and somewhat sensational style.

Charles Mackay s Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Tim Phillips’ thoroughly up-to-date interpretation of Charles Mackay’s Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, a classic of popular psychology, illustrates the principles of Mackay’s analysis of financial bubbles ...

Charles Mackay s Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

Tim Phillips’ thoroughly up-to-date interpretation of Charles Mackay’s Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, a classic of popular psychology, illustrates the principles of Mackay’s analysis of financial bubbles with modern examples to enable 21st century readers to understand crowd psychology and invest wisely.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds and Confusi n de Confusiones

. . "This is the most important book ever written about crowdpsychology and, by extension, about financial markets. A seriousstudent of the markets and even anyone interested in the extremesof human behavior should read this book!

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds and Confusi  n de Confusiones

"The market never ceases to befuddle and beguile. These twovenerable works are fixtures on the short lists for most valuablebooks on the securities markets, and investors continue to cherishthem." -From the Introduction by Martin S. Fridson ManagingDirector, Merrill Lynch & Co. Author of InvestmentIllusions Exploring the sometimes hilarious, sometimes devastating impact ofcrowd behavior and trading trickery on the financial markets, thisbook brilliantly combines two all-time investment classics.Extraordinary Popular Delusions and Confusión de Confusionestake us from Tulipmania in 1634-when tulips actually traded at ahigher price than gold-to the South Sea "bubble" of 1720, andbeyond. Securities analyst and author Martin Fridson guides you ona quirky, entertaining, and intriguing journey back throughtime. Chosen by the Financial Times as Two of the Ten Best Books EverWritten on Investment Critical Praise . . . "This is the most important book ever written about crowdpsychology and, by extension, about financial markets. A seriousstudent of the markets and even anyone interested in the extremesof human behavior should read this book!" -Ron Insana, CNBC "In combining 'Extraordinary' with 'Confusion,' the result is notextraordinary confusion. Instead, with clarity, the book sears intomodern investor minds the dangers of following the crowd." -GregHeberlein, The Seattle Times "You will see between its staid lines (written in ye olde Englishand as ponderable as Buddha's navel) that, despite what the mediasays, nothing really important has changed in the financial marketsin centuries." -Kenneth L. Fisher, Forbes

Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

This informative, funny collection encompasses a broad range of manias and deceptions from haunted houses and the prophecies of Nostradamus to speculative excess. Charles MacKay explains it all in this classic edition. Enjoy!

Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

If you’ve ever wondered where popular catch phrases and slang comes from or why men’s beards go in and out of fashion, then this book is for you. How often do you come across a book that can explain most everything? Much of today’s news has a basis in prior historical events. The internet IPO market shares striking similarities to the Dutch “tulip mania” of the 1600’s. The conflict in the Middle East can trace its roots to the Crusades. The recent satanic child abuse trials are reminiscent of the European witch trials of the 1400s-1600s. This complete two-volume edition demonstrates that the madness and confusion of crowds knows no limits, and has no temporal bounds. Volume II contains the following: Influence of Politics and Religion on the Hair and Beard The Crusades The Witch Mania The Slow Poisoners Haunted Houses Popular Follies in Great Cities Popular Admiration for Great Thieves Duels and Ordeals Relics Here are astonishing and entertaining tales of thievery, greed and madness. This informative, funny collection encompasses a broad range of manias and deceptions from haunted houses and the prophecies of Nostradamus to speculative excess. Charles MacKay explains it all in this classic edition. Enjoy!

More Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

This is the sequel to and updating of Charles Mackay's classic work, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds.

More Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

This is the sequel to and updating of Charles Mackay's classic work, Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds. The Mackay book, now almost 160 years old, is still in print in many additions and was long celebrated as a source of investment wisdom.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

This is the unabridged edition that includes all three volumes.

Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds

This is the unabridged edition that includes all three volumes. It has the entire original arrangement and full length chapters as they were originally published in 1841. This includes the preface, which is often omitted from abridged versions. In this book, Charles Mackay discusses the irrational behaviors of crowds in the economy, war and magic. He gives several different examples of market bubbles such as the Mississippi Scheme and the infamous Tulip Mania in the Netherlands. Ever since it was written, Investors have used it as a guide to help identify boom and bust cycles. Extraordinary Popular Delusions and The Madness of Crowds has had an important influence on economists in understanding of crowd psychology and feedback loops.