Faith and Human Rights

This book argues that the idea of human rights is not exclusively religious, but that its realization in practice requires urgent action on the part of people of all faiths, and of none.

Faith and Human Rights

This book argues that the idea of human rights is not exclusively religious, but that its realization in practice requires urgent action on the part of people of all faiths, and of none. Acknowledging the ambiguous moral legacy of their own tradition, Christianity, the authors draw on christological themes to draft blueprints for a culturally sensitive "theology of human rights."

Injustice Memory and Faith in Human Rights

This multi-disciplinary collection interrogates the role of human rights in addressing past injustices.

Injustice  Memory and Faith in Human Rights

This multi-disciplinary collection interrogates the role of human rights in addressing past injustices. The volume draws on legal scholars, political scientists, anthropologists and political philosophers grappling with the weight of the memory of historical injustices arising from conflicts in Europe, the Middle East and Australasia. It examines the role of human rights as legal doctrine, rhetoric and policy as developed by states, international organizations, regional groups and non-governmental bodies. The authors question whether faith in human rights is justified as balm to heal past injustice or whether such faith nourishes both victimhood and self-justification. These issues are explored through three discrete sections: moments of memory and injustice, addressing injustice; and questions of faith. In each of these sections, authors address the manner in which memory of past conflicts and injustice haunt our contemporary understanding of human rights. The volume questions whether the expectation that human rights law can deal with past injustice has undermined the development of an emancipatory politics of human rights for our current world.

Faith and Freedom

Papers chiefly presented at a conference titled "Religion, culture, and women's human rights in the Muslim world," held Sept. 9-10, 1994 at the American University in Washington, D.C., and sponsored by Sisterhood Is Global Institute.

Faith and Freedom

Papers chiefly presented at a conference titled "Religion, culture, and women's human rights in the Muslim world," held Sept. 9-10, 1994 at the American University in Washington, D.C., and sponsored by Sisterhood Is Global Institute.

Keeping Faith with Human Rights

But throughout their history, human rights have endured sustained attempts at disenfranchisement. In this provocative study, Linda Hogan defends human rights language while simultaneously reenvisioning its future.

Keeping Faith with Human Rights

The human rights regime is one of modernity's great civilizing triumphs. From the formal promulgation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 to the subsequent embrace of this declaration by the newly independent states of Africa, human rights have emerged as the primary discourse of global politics and as an increasingly prominent category in the international and domestic legal system. But throughout their history, human rights have endured sustained attempts at disenfranchisement. In this provocative study, Linda Hogan defends human rights language while simultaneously reenvisioning its future. Avoiding problematic claims about shared universal values, Hogan draws on the constructivist strand of political philosophy to argue for a three-pronged conception of human rights: as requirements for human flourishing, as necessary standards of human community, and as the basis for emancipatory politics. In the process, she shows that it is theoretically possible and politically necessary for theologians to keep faith with human rights. Indeed, the Christian tradition—the wellspring of many of the ethical commitments considered central to human rights—must embrace its vital role in the project.

Faith in Human Rights

In this first comprehensive study of the problem of a universal definition of human rights, Robert Traer argues that contemporary theological discourse contains an affirmation of faith that unites members of world religious traditions with ...

Faith in Human Rights

In this first comprehensive study of the problem of a universal definition of human rights, Robert Traer argues that contemporary theological discourse contains an affirmation of faith that unites members of world religious traditions with secular humanists in a common struggle to establish human rights as the basis for human dignity. Scholars of religion, law, and comparative religious ethics, as well as human rights advocates will find it an invaluable guide.

Faith and Human Rights

This book argues that the idea of human rights is not exclusively religious, but that its realization in practice requires urgent action on the part of people of all faiths, and of none.

Faith and Human Rights

This book argues that the idea of human rights is not exclusively religious, but that its realization in practice requires urgent action on the part of people of all faiths, and of none. Acknowledging the ambiguous moral legacy of their own tradition, Christianity, the authors draw on christological themes to draft blueprints for a culturally sensitive "theology of human rights."

Human Rights the UN and the Bah s in Iran

This book provides the first comprehensive assessment of the contribution of the United Nations to the human rights situation of the Bahá ís in Iran.

Human Rights  the UN and the Bah      s in Iran

This book provides the first comprehensive assessment of the contribution of the United Nations to the human rights situation of the Bahá ís in Iran. It does this by examining the theoretical, legal, institutional and political dimensions of this issue in detail. The situation of the Bahá í community in Iran between 1979 and 2002 provides a particularly good test case for the international community due to its clarity. By giving attention to a singular case within a discrete time frame, this book is able to effectively examine the impact of UN human rights protection. Attention is given in this study to the clash between religion and human rights, the protection of freedom of religion or belief in international law, the workings of UN human rights charter-based and treaty bodies and their various mechanisms, and recommendations for the resolution of the Bahá í human rights situation in Iran.

Religious Human Rights in Global Perspective

Media. By James Finn.

Religious Human Rights in Global Perspective

Media. By James Finn.

Faith in Human Rights

Faith in Human Rights


Religious Human Rights in Global Perspective

This volume and its companion Religious Human Rights in Global Perspective: Religious Perspectives are products of an ongoing project on religion, human rights and democracy undertaken by the Law and Religion Program at Emory University.

Religious Human Rights in Global Perspective

In this 'Dickensian century' of human rights, the world has cultivated the best of religious rights protections, but witnessed the worst of religious rights abuses. In this volume, Jimmy Carter, John T. Noonan, Jr., and a score of leading jurists assess critically and comparatively the religious rights laws and practices of the international community and of selected states in the Atlantic continents. This volume and its companion Religious Human Rights in Global Perspective: Religious Perspectives are products of an ongoing project on religion, human rights and democracy undertaken by the Law and Religion Program at Emory University.

Human Rights

Contains essays, primary source documents, and research tools that examine issues associated with human rights. "...an excellent resource for reports.

Human Rights

The belief that all human beings are born with inalienable rights has been the cornerstone of many successful, democratic societies. Such rights include the right to life, freedom (of thought, belief, conscience, expression, and movement), and property; others include economic, social, and cultural rights such as safety, health, education, equality, and prosperity; or the right to development. As perspectives on the basic tenets of human rights vary by country and culture, one must question whether these rights are truly inalienable, and whether they are inherent or created. Human Rights enables readers to understand international standards for human rights, human rights abuses around the world, and the social, economic, and natural causes and effects of such abuses. The history of human rights concepts and declarations of human rights are examined, including the distinction that many historical theories and movements in human rights have made between social groups, namely free men versus women, children, slaves, and immigrants. This new resource goes on to explore human rights positions in the United States, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, China, Chechnya, and Iran. Each case study details the country's historical and cultural perspectives, unique circumstances, current debates and priorities, and efforts to reform and protect human rights.

Does Human Rights Need God

This consequential volume presents leading scholars, activists, and officials from four continents who dare to discuss the "why" behind human rights.

Does Human Rights Need God

When the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was drafted in 1945, French Catholic philosopher Jacques Maritain observed, "We agree on these rights, providing we are not asked why. With the 'why,' the dispute begins." The world since then has continued to agree to disagree, fearing that an open discussion of the divergent rationales for human rights would undermine the consensus of the Declaration. Is it possible, however, that current failures to protect human rights may stem from this tacit agreement to avoid addressing the underpinnings of human rights? This consequential volume presents leading scholars, activists, and officials from four continents who dare to discuss the "why" behind human rights. Appraising the current situation from diverse religious perspectives -- Jewish, Protestant, Orthodox, Muslim, Confucian, and secular humanist -- the contributors openly address the question whether God is a necessary part of human rights. Despite their widely varying commitments and approaches, the authors affirm that an investigation into the "why" of human rights need not devolve into irreconcilable conflict. Contributors: Khaled Abou El Fadl Barbra Barnett Elizabeth M. Bucar Jean Bethke Elshtain Robert P. George Vigen Guroian Louis Henkin Courtney W. Howland David Novak Sari Nusseibeh Martin Palouš Robert A. Seiple Max L. Stackhouse Charles Villa-Vicencio Anthony C. Yu

Religious Diversity and Human Rights

Introduction - Irene Bloom

Religious Diversity and Human Rights

Introduction - Irene Bloom

Faith in Human Rights

Faith in Human Rights


Faith in Human Rights

Indeed, the expression "faith in human rights," first used in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, regularly appears in statements by human rights advocates who express no particular religious commitment.

Faith in Human Rights


Human Rights Faith and Culture

Presents a collection of papers from a 1998 conference hosted by the Association for Baha'i Studies on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in Canberra, Australia.

Human Rights  Faith and Culture

Presents a collection of papers from a 1998 conference hosted by the Association for Baha'i Studies on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in Canberra, Australia.

Human Rights and the World s Major Religions 2nd Edition

Based on the celebrated five-volume set published in 2005, this updated one-volume edition offers readers a concise yet complete understanding of the interplay between the major religions and human rights.

Human Rights and the World s Major Religions  2nd Edition

Based on the celebrated five-volume set published in 2005, this updated one-volume edition offers readers a concise yet complete understanding of the interplay between the major religions and human rights.