Law Love and Freedom

Before the Fall, 'they are not aware of being distinct beings, neither distinct from each other or from God'.40 After ... between prelapsarian love and fallen love, so we can distinguish between prelapsarian freedom and fallen freedom.

Law  Love and Freedom

Moving from monasticism to constitutionalism, and from antinomianism to anarchism, this book reveals law's connection with love and freedom.

Milton s Theology of Freedom

Human Freedom and the Fall In Paradise Lost Adam and Eve are , like God , characterised by the ability to choose between alternative possibilities . God has placed them in an environment in which they are free to grow and to develop ...

Milton s Theology of Freedom

At the centre of John Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost (1667) is a radical commitment to divine and human freedom. This study situates Paradise Lost within the context of post-Reformation theological controversy, and pursues the theological portrayal of freedom as it unfolds throughout the poem. The study identifies and explores the ways in which Milton is both continuous and discontinuous with the major post-Reformation traditions in his depiction of predestination, creation, free will, sin, and conversion. Milton's deep commitment to freedom is shown to underlie his appropriation and creative transformation of a wide range of existing theological concepts.

Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant

55, 57–58; and Gordon Michalson Jr., Fallen Freedom, p. 57–58, 85–87. 15 See also Rlg, 72–73, 89: 'The judicial verdict of one who knows the heart of the accused must be thought as based on the universal disposition of the latter, ...

Difficult Freedom and Radical Evil in Kant

To speak of evil is to speak of a gap between what is and what should be. If classical approaches to this problem often relied on a religious or metaphysical framework to structure their response, Kant's answer is typically modern in that it places within the subject the means of its own moral regeneration. And yet from his first essays on ethics to later, more rigorous writings on the issue, Kant also admits an undeniable fallibility and inherent weakness to humanity. This book explores this neglected existential side of Kant's work. It presents radical evil as vacillating between tragic and freedom, at the threshold of humanity. Through it's careful exegesis of the Kantian corpus, in gauging contemporary responses from both philosophical traditions, and by drawing from concrete examples of evil, the book offers a novel and accessible account of what is widely considered to be an intricate yet urgent problem of philosophy.

Kant s Conception of Freedom

... however, not being contradictory is a rather low bar. 40 Ibid. 41 Although it is not clear that he had Quinn's objection in mind, a more direct response to the problem has been suggested by Gordon E. Michalson, Jr., Fallen Freedom ...

Kant s Conception of Freedom

Traces the development of Kant's views on free will from earlier writings through the three Critiques and beyond.

The Virtues of Freedom

112–28. Menzer, Paul. “Der Entwicklungsgang der Kantischen Ethik bis zum Erscheinung der Grundlegung zur Metaphysik der Sitten.” Kant-Studien 1 (1897), 2 (1898), and 3 (1899). Michalson, Gordon E., Jr. Fallen Freedom: Kant on Radical ...

The Virtues of Freedom

The essays collected in this volume by Paul Guyer, one of the world's foremost Kant scholars, explore Kant's attempt to develop a morality grounded on the intrinsic and unconditional value of the human freedom to set our own ends. When regulated by the principle that the freedom of all is equally valuable, the freedom to set our own ends -- what Kant calls "humanity" - becomes what he calls autonomy. These essays explore Kant's strategies for establishing the premise that freedom is the inner worth of the world or the essential end of humankind, as he says, and for deriving the specific duties that fundamental principle of morality generates in the empirical circumstances of human existence. The Virtues of Freedom further investigates Kant's attempts to prove that we are always free to live up to this moral ideal, that is, that we have free will no matter what, as well as his more successful explorations of the ways in which our natural tendencies to be moral -- dispositions to the feeling of respect and more specific feelings such as love and self-esteem -- can and must be cultivated and educated. Guyer finally examines the various models of human community that Kant develops from his premise that our associations must be based on the value of freedom for all. The contrasts but also similarities of Kant's moral philosophy to that of David Hume but many of his other predecessors and contemporaries, such as Stoics and Epicureans, Pufendorf and Wolff, Hutcheson, Kames, and Smith, are also explored.

Freedom from Fatalism

Like a compass that no longer points to true north, the fallen will is inclined towards objects that appear to it to be ... And though freedom of the will has demonstrably changed after the fall, there is asense in whichfreedom of the ...

Freedom from Fatalism

Samuel Rutherford’s (1600-1661) scholastic theology has been criticized as overly deterministic and even fatalistic, a charge common to Reformed Orthodox theologians of the era. This project applies the new scholarship on Reformed Orthodoxy to Rutherford’s doctrine of divine providence. The doctrine of divine providence touches upon many of the disputed points in the older scholarship, including the relationship between divine sovereignty and creaturely freedom, necessity and contingency, predetermination, and the problem of evil. Through a close examination of Rutherford’s Latin works of scholastic theology, as well as many of his English works, a portrait emerges of the absolutely free and independent Creator, who does not utilize his sovereignty to dominate his subordinate creatures, but rather to guarantee their freedom. This analysis challenges the older scholarship while making useful contributions to the lively conversation concerning Reformed thought on freedom.

Man

Man , then , according to Calvin , was free before the fall , and lost this freedom through sin . As fallen man he does indeed will and act , but in this activity he walks on a path he cannot leave through his own powers .

Man

This is a print on demand book and is therefore non- returnable. This study in theological anthropology considers man as the image of God, the meaning of the image, immortality, and human freedom, dealing always with living, actual man and his inescapable relation to God.

Freedom s Empire

As Spengemann points out, Milton's story of Eve's fall is laced with Atlantic allusions. Implicitly, Milton's Satan is a roving Atlantic libertine, the first of many in English-language literature, I'll suggest.

Freedom s Empire

A sweeping argument that from the mid-seventeenth century until the mid-twentieth, the English-language novel encoded ideas equating race with liberty.

Mystical Theology and Continental Philosophy

With the placement of freedom and ethics in conflict with the fallen world, the universal introduction of death shows itself to be a counterfeit form of freedom; the ethical mission can be abstracted as the identification of the ...

Mystical Theology and Continental Philosophy

Exploration of the interface between mystical theology and continental philosophy is a defining feature of the current intellectual and even devotional climate. But to what extent and in what depth are these disciplines actually speaking to one another; or even speaking about the same phenomena? This book draws together original contributions by leading and emerging international scholars, delineating emerging debates in this growing and dynamic field of research, and spanning mystical and philosophical traditions from the ancient, to the medieval, modern, and contemporary. At the heart of which lies Meister Eckhart, perhaps the single most influential Christian mystic for modern times. The book is organised around significant historical and contemporary figures who speak across the intersections of philosophy and theology, offering new insights into key interlocutors such as Pseudo-Dionysius, Augustine, Isaac Luria, Eckhart, Hegel, Heidegger, Marion, Kierkegaard, Deleuze, Laruelle, and Žižek. Designed both to contribute to current trends in mystical theology and philosophy, and elicit dialogue and debate from further afield, this book speaks within an emerging space exploring the retrieval of the mystical within a post-secular context.

The Philosophy of Church Life

As a matter of fact man did fall ; and by that fall his personal freedom was greatly impaired , in the highest sense , indeed , lost ! For while the ability to choose at all is , in one sense , freedom , and sufficiently constitutes a ...

The Philosophy of Church Life


The Complete Poetical Works

We are not free : doth Freedom , then , consist In musing with our faces toward the Past , While petty cares , and crawling ... is past retrieving ; Experience is a dumb , dead thing ; The victory ' s in believing . fall ; FREEDOM .

The Complete Poetical Works


Doolie Gogh

The Kalashnikov dropped from its paws and Lieutenant Freedom was quick to snatch it from the air. Before the enormous beast fell to the ground, Lieutenant Freedom slid under its legs for cover. Like wild animals, the other bears fired ...

Doolie Gogh

Doolie Gogh is your everyday superhero. He can fly, he has super strength, speed and healing. But he also has a huge ego problem--he only performs heroics because of the public attention he gets. The saving people’s lives and stopping criminals is merely a side benefit. His reputation takes a nosedive after he accidentally destroys an entire bank and a museum while battling a nasty supervillian. Forced to retire by a powerful and no-nonsense senator, Doolie does what any former superhero would do: finds a way to needed again. Becoming a villain so he can prove his worth as a good guy seems like the right thing to do, but it turns out to be much more complicated than that.

Freedom Park

Freedom Park


Kierkegaard and His German Contemporaries Philosophy

For the development of the view that Kant's concepts of grace reflect his unassimilated Pietist background , see Gordon E. Michalson , Jr. , Fallen Freedom : Kant on Radical Evil and Moral Regeneration , Cambridge : Cambridge University ...

Kierkegaard and His German Contemporaries  Philosophy

This first tome treats the German philosophical influences on Kierkegaard. The dependence of Danish philosophy on German philosophy is beyond question. In a book review in his Hegelian journal Perseus, the poet, playwright and critic, Johan Ludvig Heiberg (1791-1869) laments the sad state of philosophy in Denmark, while lauding German speculative philosophy. Moreover, Kierkegaard's lifelong enemy, the theologian Hans Lassen Martensen (1808-84) claims without exaggeration that the Danish systems of philosophy can be regarded as the disjecta membra of earlier German systems. All of the major German idealist philosophers made an impact in Denmark: Kant, Fichte, Schelling, and most significantly, Hegel. Kierkegaard was widely read in the German philosophical literature, which he made use of in countless ways throughout his authorship.

Freedom s Progress

[14: 4] Augustine believes, then, that human beings are naturally social and that had they not fallen into sin they would have lived together under a benevolent paternal direction. [see Markus 1970, 95] But man did fall, as a result of ...

Freedom s Progress

In Freedom's Progress?, Gerard Casey argues that the progress of freedom has largely consisted in an intermittent and imperfect transition from tribalism to individualism, from the primacy of the collective to the fragile centrality of the individual person and of freedom. Such a transition is, he argues, neither automatic nor complete, nor are relapses to tribalism impossible. The reason for the fragility of freedom is simple: the importance of individual freedom is simply not obvious to everyone. Most people want security in this world, not liberty. 'Libertarians,' writes Max Eastman, 'used to tell us that "the love of freedom is the strongest of political motives," but recent events have taught us the extravagance of this opinion. The "herd-instinct" and the yearning for paternal authority are often as strong. Indeed the tendency of men to gang up under a leader and submit to his will is of all political traits the best attested by history.' The charm of the collective exercises a perennial magnetic attraction for the human spirit. In the 20th century, Fascism, Bolshevism and National Socialism were, Casey argues, each of them a return to tribalism in one form or another and many aspects of our current Western welfare states continue to embody tribalist impulses. Thinkers you would expect to feature in a history of political thought feature in this book - Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Locke, Mill and Marx - but you will also find thinkers treated in Freedom's Progress? who don't usually show up in standard accounts - Johannes Althusius, Immanuel Kant, William Godwin, Max Stirner, Joseph Proudhon, Mikhail Bakunin, Pyotr Kropotkin, Josiah Warren, Benjamin Tucker and Auberon Herbert. Freedom's Progress? also contains discussions of the broader social and cultural contexts in which politics takes its place, with chapters on slavery, Christianity, the universities, cities, Feudalism, law, kingship, the Reformation, the English Revolution and what Casey calls Twentieth Century Tribalisms - Bolshevism, Fascism and National Socialism and an extensive chapter on human prehistory.

Freedom s Journey

Inquiring the cause of the demonstration, we were told that Richmond had fallen. Mrs. Harlan took one of my hands in each of her own, and we rejoiced together. I ran across to my work-room, and on entering it, discovered that the girls ...

Freedom s Journey

Presents a collection of primary documents by African Americans describing their experiences and perspectives of the Civil War.

The Evangelical Repository and United Presbyterian Review

It is the freedom of a fallen world . We do not find the terms “ free will ” and “ free agency ” in the word ; but we do find that man , in his lost condition , is " free from righteousness . " Speaking of their former condition ...

The Evangelical Repository and United Presbyterian Review


Freedom s Call

It really disturbed him that the same people he grew up with, the ones who had once espoused freedom from materialistic pursuits, had fallen victim to the very mentality they had opposed in the 1960s.

Freedom s Call

Johnny Locker is the leader of a massively popular movement to overhaul the nation's Social Security system. Unbeknownst to him, another movement is in place-and this one's much more dangerous. A charismatic military hero has a plan to overthrow the entire governmental system and replace it with one more closely based on the Constitution. And he wants Johnny's help.Johnny is quickly swept up in the general's big ideas, but he soon realizes that the new leader is just as corrupt as the old. With the support of other dissidents, Johnny finds himself once again leading a grassroots movement that will reshape the nation. He has always been a bit of a rebel, but to answer freedom's call, he must also become a revolutionary.

History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America

The party of slavery declares that institution munificent and approved of God , and therefore inviolable . The party of freedom seeks complete and universal emancipation . ” Admitting that the Whig party had fallen from its ancient ...

History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America


Moments of pleasure Adolphus and Adila and other poems

37 The hero who , by mere ambition fired , Conquers the world , is by that world admired , But with the vanquished fallen freedom's crushed , And wounded justice trampled in the dust ; But reeking justice , with avenging blow , Entwine ...

Moments of pleasure  Adolphus and Adila  and other poems