Families and Communes

As the only contemporary exploration of communal families, this book investigates the assumptions that scholars and others have made regarding the status of the family within communes, and debunks current myths about communes and communal ...

Families and Communes

This book focuses specifically on the role of the family in communal life. Communal groups are one type of nontraditional families, some communes are predisposed to families while others are not and some communal families can be replacements or substitutes for nuclear families. Historic communal groups such as Shakers, Oneida, Amana, and the Mormons are investigated as are contemporary rural and urban communal groups such as Twin Oaks, Jesus People USA, and the Hutterites.

Families and Communes

In an exploration of the role of the family within the commune this book focuses on historic communal groups such as Shakers Oneida, Amana and the Mormons, as well as contemporary rural and urban groups such as Jesus People USA and the ...

Families and Communes

In an exploration of the role of the family within the commune this book focuses on historic communal groups such as Shakers Oneida, Amana and the Mormons, as well as contemporary rural and urban groups such as Jesus People USA and the Hutterites.

Families and Communes

What our concern will be is to discover the means by which communal families structure their social life. ... he used to begin a chapter on the family and women in communes, “The Family and the Commune: Adverse or Congruous Entities?

Families and Communes

This book focuses specifically on the role of the family in communal life. Communal groups are one type of nontraditional families, some communes are predisposed to families while others are not and some communal families can be replacements or substitutes for nuclear families. Historic communal groups such as Shakers, Oneida, Amana, and the Mormons are investigated as are contemporary rural and urban communal groups such as Twin Oaks, Jesus People USA, and the Hutterites.

Families of Eden

Families of Eden


The Family

The Family


The Family Communes and Utopian Societies

Papers presented at a seminar held during the annual conference of the Society for Religion in Higher Education, Wells College, 1971.

The Family  Communes  and Utopian Societies

Papers presented at a seminar held during the annual conference of the Society for Religion in Higher Education, Wells College, 1971.

The New Families

The New Families


New Families The

This book derives from a pilot study, 'Psycho-social networks of young dangerous drug users, ' NIMH grant number MH14943. The work was conducted ... from September 1966 to December 1969.

New Families The

This book derives from a pilot study, 'Psycho-social networks of young dangerous drug users, ' NIMH grant number MH14943. The work was conducted ... from September 1966 to December 1969.

Danish Communes

Danish Communes


The 60 s Communes

Family” is a term that surfaces again and again in interviews with and writings of the communards—paradoxically, to some degree, because almost always the new communitarians had rejected their families of birth in favor of new friends.

The 60 s Communes

The greatest wave of communal living in American history crested in the tumultuous 1960s era including the early 1970s. To the fascination and amusement of more decorous citizens, hundreds of thousands of mostly young dreamers set out to build a new culture apart from the established society. Widely believed by the larger public to be sinks of drug-ridden sexual immorality, the communes both intrigued and repelled the American people. The intentional communities of the 1960s era were far more diverse than the stereotype of the hippie commune would suggest. A great many of them were religious in basis, stressing spiritual seeking and disciplined lifestyles. Others were founded on secular visions of a better society. Hundreds of them became so stable that they survive today. This book surveys the broad sweep of this great social yearning from the first portents of a new type of communitarianism in the early 1960s through the waning of the movement in the mid-1970s. Based on more than five hundred interviews conducted for the 60s Communes Project, among other sources, it preserves a colorful and vigorous episode in American history. The book includes an extensive directory of active and non-active communes, complete with dates of origin and dissolution.

Treasures of the Island

Treasures of the Island


Police Power in the Italian Communes 1228 1326

These details suggest that Bettino was pursuing avendetta through criminal accusations instead of direct violence—a vendetta that involved family friends, not just blood relatives. In light of this confession, the podestà found Bettino ...

Police Power in the Italian Communes  1228 1326

Medieval states are widely assumed to have lacked police forces. Yet in the Italian city-republics, soldiers patrolled the streets daily in search of lawbreakers. *Police Power in the Italian Communes, 1228-1326* is the first book to examine the emergence of urban policing in medieval Italy and its impact on city life. Focusing on Bologna in the thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries, Gregory Roberts shows how police forces gave teeth to the communes' many statutes through a range of patrol activities. Whether seeking outlaws in the countryside or nighttime serenaders in the streets, urban police forces pursued lawbreakers energetically and effectively. They charged hundreds of individuals each year with arms-bearing, gambling, and curfew violations, convicting many of them in the process. Roberts draws on a trove of unpublished evidence from judicial archives, rich with witness testimony, to paint a vivid picture of policing in daily life and the capacity of urban governments to coerce. Breaking new ground in the study of violence, justice, and state formation in the Middle Ages, *Police Power in the Italian Communes* sheds fresh light on the question of how ostensibly modern institutions emerge from premodern social orders.

The Love Israel Family

In The Love Israel Family, Charles LeWarne tells the compelling story of this group of idealistic seekers whose quest for a communal life grounded in love, service, and obedience to a charismatic leader foundered when that leader's power ...

The Love Israel Family

Winner of the Malstrom Award of the League of Snohomish County Historical Organizations In 1968, a time of turbulence and countercultural movements, a one-time television salesman named Paul Erdmann changed his name to Love Israel and started a controversial religious commune in Seattle's middle-class Queen Anne Hill neighborhood. He quickly gathered a following and they too adopted the Israel surname, along with biblical or virtuous first names such as Honesty, Courage, and Strength. The burgeoning Love Israel Family lived a communal lifestyle centered on meditation and the philosophy that all persons were one and life was eternal. They flourished for more than a decade, owning houses and operating businesses on the Hill, although rumors of drug use, control of members, and unconventional sexual arrangements dogged them. By 1984, perceptions among many followers that some Family members - especially Love Israel himself - had become more equal than others led to a bitter breakup in which two-thirds of the members defected. The remaining faithful, about a hundred strong, resettled on a ranch the Family retained near the town of Arlington, Washington, north of Seattle. There they recouped and adapted, with apparent social and economic success, for two more decades. In The Love Israel Family, Charles LeWarne tells the compelling story of this group of idealistic seekers whose quest for a communal life grounded in love, service, and obedience to a charismatic leader foundered when that leader's power distanced him from his followers. LeWarne followed the Family for years, attending its celebrations and interviewing the faithful and the disaffected alike. He tells the Family's story with both sympathy and balance, describing daily life in the urban and later the rural communes and explaining the Family's deeply felt spiritual beliefs. The Love Israel Family is an important chapter in the history of communal experiments in the United States.

Maternal Child Health Nursing

Although blended families usually lessen financial difficulties, finances can be severely limited, especially if one or ... The Communal Family Communes are formed by groups of people who choose to live together as an extended family.

Maternal   Child Health Nursing

Growing research shows that many children from immigrant and refugee families are not doing well in school, due in part to linguistic and cultural disadvantages. Teaching dual-language learners requires cultural sensitivity, an understanding of language acquisition, and intentional teaching strategies. Combining research and techniques, this resource helps early childhood educators support dual-language learners as they develop the skills necessary for school readiness and success.

Marriage and Modernization

All of these forces are seen to undercut the cohesion of families , homogenize gender roles , undercut mutual dependence ... should play a major role in the restoration of local communities , family farms , and agrarian communes .

Marriage and Modernization

The processes of modernization and globalization promise more wealth and health for many people. But they are also a threat to the stability and quality of marriage and family life. This new book -- at once sobering and constructive -- looks at the impact of these processes on marriage and asks what Christianity, in cooperation with other religions, can do to strengthen married life today. Among the deleterious effects of modernization and globalization on marriage are a worldwide drift of men away from the responsibility of parenthood and the tendency of mothers too readily to take on the task of childrearing alone. After looking at recent research on these and other problems, Don Browning suggests that the cure for modern marital disruption entails reforming and reconstructing the institution of marriage while also nurturing relevant forms of social support. Yet the effort to initiate a "world marriage revival" requires a complex cultural work, and Browning explores the key contributions that the religions of the world must make for such an effort to be successful.