Farthest North

If the current runs south here, how is that great open sea we steamed north across to be explained? and the bay we ended in farthest north? These could only be produced by the north-going current which I presupposed.

Farthest North

The memoirs by Fridtjof Nansen tell about the epoch-making attempt to reach the North Pole, which ended in the farthest northern journey in the history of his time. Fridtjof Nansen had an extraordinary idea of how to get to the North Pole by ship. After discovering that the remains of the boat, wrecked near Russian Siberia, were found in the Northern Atlantic, he presumed that there should be some drift through the North Pole. So, he developed a specifically customized ship that was frozen into an ice cube and crossed the Polar waters in this shape. The vessel did freeze successfully. Yet, the journey was too long, and Nansen left the ship to reach the Pole on skis. He and his companion Hjalmar Johansen left for the pole but didn't manage to get it. However, they were the first people to achieve the farthest north latitude of 86°13.6′N. The story tells about this challenging journey through snow and waters makes a unique record of one of the most incredible northern expeditions.

Farthest North

Farthest North (1897) is his compelling account of the three-year voyage. “To hear the story from Nansen's lips was to realize that they were truly of the Viking breed,” said The New York Times. He later published the scientific results ...

Farthest North

In 1893 Nansen set sail in the Fram, a ship specially designed and built to be frozen into the polar ice cap, withstand its crushing pressures, and travel with the sea's drift closer to the North Pole than anyone had ever gone before. Experts said such a ship couldn't be built and that the voyage was tantamount to suicide. This brilliant first-person account, originally published in 1897, marks the beginning of the modern age of exploration. Nansen vividly describes the dangerous voyage and his 15-month-long dash to the North Pole by sledge. An unforgettable tale and a must-read for any armchair explorer.

Farthest North Vol 1 2

If the current runs south here, how is that great open sea we steamed north across to be explained? and the bay we ended in farthest north? These could only be produced by the north-going current which I presupposed.

Farthest North  Vol  1 2

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION: The memoirs by Fridtjof Nansen tell about the epoch-making attempt to reach the North Pole, which ended in the farthest northern journey in the history of his time. Fridtjof Nansen had an extraordinary idea of how to get to the North Pole by ship. After discovering that the remains of the boat, wrecked near Russian Siberia, were found in the Northern Atlantic, he presumed that there should be some drift through the North Pole. So, he developed a specifically customized ship that was frozen into an ice cube and crossed the Polar waters in this shape. The vessel did freeze successfully. Yet, the journey was too long, and Nansen left the ship to reach the Pole on skis. He and his companion Hjalmar Johansen left for the pole but didn't manage to get it. However, they were the first people to achieve the farthest north latitude of 86°13.6′N. The story tells about this challenging journey through snow and waters makes a unique record of one of the most incredible northern expeditions.

Farthest North Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship Fram 1893 96 and of a Fifteen Months Sleigh Journey by Dr Nansen and Lieut Johansen Complete

If the current runs south here, how is that great open sea we steamed north across to be explained? and the bay we ended in farthest north? These could only be produced by the north-going current which I presupposed.

Farthest North  Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship    Fram    1893   96 and of a Fifteen Months    Sleigh Journey by Dr  Nansen and Lieut  Johansen  Complete

Unseen and untrodden under their spotless mantle of ice the rigid polar regions slept the profound sleep of death from the earliest dawn of time. Wrapped in his white shroud, the mighty giant stretched his clammy ice-limbs abroad, and dreamed his age-long dreams. Ages passed—deep was the silence. Then, in the dawn of history, far away in the south, the awakening spirit of man reared its head on high and gazed over the earth. To the south it encountered warmth, to the north, cold; and behind the boundaries of the unknown it placed in imagination the twin kingdoms of consuming heat and of deadly cold. But the limits of the unknown had to recede step by step before the ever-increasing yearning after light and knowledge of the human mind, till they made a stand in the north at the threshold of Nature’s great Ice Temple of the polar regions with their endless silence. Up to this point no insuperable obstacles had opposed the progress of the advancing hosts, which confidently proceeded on their way. But here the ramparts of ice and the long darkness of winter brought them to bay. Host after host marched on towards the north, only to suffer defeat. Fresh ranks stood ever ready to advance over the bodies of their predecessors. Shrouded in fog lay the mythic land of Nivlheim, where the “Rimturser”1 carried on their wild gambols. Why did we continually return to the attack? There in the darkness and cold stood Helheim, where the death-goddess held her sway; there lay Nåstrand, the shore of corpses. Thither, where no living being could draw breath, thither troop after troop made its way. To what end? Was it to bring home the dead, as did Hermod when he rode after Baldur? No! It was simply to satisfy man’s thirst for knowledge. Nowhere, in truth, has knowledge been purchased at greater cost of privation and suffering. But the spirit of mankind will never rest till every spot of these regions has been trodden by the foot of man, till every enigma has been solved. Minute by minute, degree by degree, we have stolen forward, with painful effort. Slowly the day has approached; even now we are but in its early dawn; darkness still broods over vast tracts around the Pole. Our ancestors, the old Vikings, were the first Arctic voyagers. It has been said that their expeditions to the frozen sea were of no moment, as they have left no enduring marks behind them. This, however, is scarcely correct. Just as surely as the whalers of our age, in their persistent struggles with ice and sea, form our outposts of investigation up in the north, so were the old Northmen, with Eric the Red, Leif, and others at their head, the pioneers of the polar expeditions of future generations.

The Farthest North of Humanness

Letters of Percy Grainger, 1901-1914 Percy Grainger Kay Dreyfus. ****** ------------- s-, , , , , ,~~~~--~~~~. ------------||-- - -|-- o ! The Farthest North of Humanness “To give way to human.

The Farthest North of Humanness


Ice Ship

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 10 12 13 Sverdrup, in his section of Farthest North, II:553. Sverdrup, in his section of Farthest North, II:620–22. Sverdrup, in his section of Farthest North, II:625.

Ice Ship

In the golden age of polar exploration (from the mid-1800s to the early 1900s), many an expedition set out to answer the big questionÑwas the Arctic a continent, an open ocean beyond a barrier of ice, or an ocean covered with ice? No one knew, for the ice had kept its secret well; ships trying to penetrate it all failed, often catastrophically. NorwayÕs charismatic scientist-explorer Fridtjof Nansen, convinced that it was a frozen ocean, intended to prove it in a novel if risky way: by building a ship capable of withstanding the ice, joining others on an expedition, then drifting wherever it took them, on a relentless one-way journey into discovery and fame . . . or oblivion. Ice Ship is the story of that extraordinary ship, the Fram, from conception to construction, through twenty years of three epic expeditions, to its final resting place as a museum. It is also the story of the extraordinary men who steered the Fram over the course of 84,000 miles: on a three-year, ice-bound drift, finding out what the Arctic really was; in a remarkable four-year exploration of unmapped lands in the vast Canadian Arctic; and on a twoÐyear voyage to Antarctica, where another famous Norwegian explorer, Roald Amundsen, claimed the South Pole. Ice Ship will appeal to all those fascinated with polar exploration, maritime adventure, and wooden ships, and will captivate readers of such books as The Endurance, In the Heart of the Sea, and The Last Place on Earth. With more than 100 original photographs, the book brings the Fram to life and light.

Fridtjof Nansen s Farthest North

FARTHEST NORTH BEING THE NARRATIVE OF THE VOYAGE AND EXPLORA . TION OF THE FRAM 1893-96 AND THE FIFTEEN MONTHS ' SLEDGE EXPEDITION BY DR . NANSEN AND LIEUT . JOHANSEN WITH AN APPENDIX BY OTTO SVERDRUP . CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION .

Fridtjof Nansen s  Farthest North


Farthest North Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship Fram 1893 96

north to east ( by compass ) . Now it is to be proved if my theory ... We are in latitude 75 ° N. , and have still open water and dark sky to the north and west . In the evening there was ice - light ahead ... T !! 0. 228 FARTHEST NORTH.

Farthest North  Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship  Fram  1893 96


Tide Tables Central and Western Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean

Pacific Standard Time of Moon's greatest Declination North and South , and of its Passage over the Equator , for the year 1895 . 28 22 . ... Farthest N. On equator , going N. o 00 12 On equator , going S. o oo 15 I p . m .

Tide Tables  Central and Western Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean


Exploring Polar Frontiers

Although far short of Fridtjof Nansen's record farthest north of 86°13'N in 1895,this was Peary's first extended journey over sea ice and his first use of supporting parties. Returning to land, he continued east to Cape Wyckoff on 20 ...

Exploring Polar Frontiers

Presents a reference to the efforts of humans to conquer the North and South Poles, with more than 500 biographical, geographical, and subject entries; a chronology of expeditions; and maps, illustrations, and photographs.

Popular Science

NORTH PQIE * OUR ICE CAP This chart shows the breeding ground of many of our worst blizzards, which are born in the ... Helpful as reports from this farthest north weather station are, really accurate forecasts of the winter's worst ...

Popular Science

Popular Science gives our readers the information and tools to improve their technology and their world. The core belief that Popular Science and our readers share: The future is going to be better, and science and technology are the driving forces that will help make it better.

North Pacific Ophiurans in the Collection of the United States National Museum

It is made up of some twenty - four species , of which Ophiura maculata may be cited as a typical example ; this species is represented in the collection from eighteen different stations , of which the farthest north is about lat .

    North Pacific Ophiurans in the Collection of the United States National Museum


Crops and Markets

Farthest North of the Cotton Crop As far north as Bureau County , Ill . , a crop of 400 bales of cotton , each of 400 pounds gross weight , was raised in 1859 , as reported by the census of 1860 . The northern line of that county is in ...

Crops and Markets


Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

After Moon farthest North . Mean After Pressure Moon of farthest Vapour . North . Mean Pressure of Vapour . Day . 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 in . 0.283 .286 .287 • 275 .292 .296 298 .295 .295 .277 .265 .267 .273 -278 ...

Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

List of fellows in v. 1-5, 7-16, 20-30, 32-33, 35-41, 45; continued since 1908 in the Proceedings, v. 28-

Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh

After Moon farthest North . Mean After Pressure Moon of farthest Vapour . North . Mean Pressure of Vapour . Day . 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 in . 0.283 .286 287 .275 292 296 298 .295 .295 .277 • 265 267 273 278 271 Day ...

Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh


Polar Explorations

Chapter Four: The Contest for the North Pole 36. 37. 38. 39. Moss, The Frozen Ship, p. 19. Brandt, The North Pole, p. 369. Brandt, The North Pole, p. 371. Quoted in Holland, Farthest North, p.201. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47.

Polar Explorations

One the least understood places in the world, the North and South poles have captivated the imagine of scientists, adventurers, and ordinary people for centuries. With an abundance of natural resources, including crude oil, and the possibility for new scientific breakthroughs, the race to understand the poles has at various times led many nations to make political claims in a rush to exercise control over this terrain. This comprehensive volume offers detailed accounts of the major polar explorations, the political and scientific stakes in the quest to map and contain the Arctic and Antarctica. Chapters discuss the contest for the North Pole, the "heroic age" of exploration of the South Pole during the beginning of the twentieth century, the evolution of scientific technology and its effect on research in the harsh environment, and the trends in modern polar research.

Ancient Geography

Which stretches farthest to the south , Cape Horn or the Cape of Good Hope ? Where is North America the widest ? Where the narrowest ? Where is South America widest ? Where narrowest ? What is the longitude of its eastern point ?

Ancient Geography


Chambers s English Dictionary Pronouncing Explanatory and Etymological with Vocabularies of Scottish Words and Phrases Americanisms c

Industriously : thriftily . the point farthest north . NOTARIAL , no - tā'ri - al , adj . Pertaining to or done NORTHING , north'ing , n . Motion , distance , or by a notary . [ manner . tendency north ward : distance of a heavenly body ...

Chambers s English Dictionary  Pronouncing  Explanatory  and Etymological  with Vocabularies of Scottish Words and Phrases  Americanisms   c


Toward the Poles

He reached a farthest north of 70 ° 41 ' N. , at which point he decided to head south and find a wintering place . This turned out to be in the Hawaiian Islands where Cook was killed by the natives . During the summer of 1779 ...

Toward the Poles


A new Primary Geography

What two bays in the northern part of North America ? Which of them is farthest north ? Where is Davis ' Sʻrait ? LESSON I. What ocean bounds North America on the north ? On the east ? What gulf on the south ? What ocean on the west ?

A new Primary Geography