Farthest North

In 1893 Nansen set sail in the Fram, a ship specially designed and built to be frozen into the polar ice cap, withstand its crushing pressures, and travel with the sea's drift closer to the North Pole than anyone had ever gone before.

Farthest North

In 1893 Nansen set sail in the Fram, a ship specially designed and built to be frozen into the polar ice cap, withstand its crushing pressures, and travel with the sea's drift closer to the North Pole than anyone had ever gone before. Experts said such a ship couldn't be built and that the voyage was tantamount to suicide. This brilliant first-person account, originally published in 1897, marks the beginning of the modern age of exploration. Nansen vividly describes the dangerous voyage and his 15-month-long dash to the North Pole by sledge. An unforgettable tale and a must-read for any armchair explorer.

Farthest North

18 As this promontory is probably the land Jackson saw farthest north in the spring of 1895, it has no name upon my map. It is otherwise with the islands outside, which he did not notice. They are only indicated approximately (as ...

Farthest North

Reproduction of the original: Farthest North by Fridtjof Nansen

Farthest North

Farthest North


Farthest North Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship Fram 1893 96 and of a Fifteen Months Sleigh Journey by Dr Nansen and Lieut Johansen Complete

If the current runs south here, how is that great open sea we steamed north across to be explained? and the bay we ended in farthest north? These could only be produced by the north-going current which I presupposed.

Farthest North  Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship    Fram    1893   96 and of a Fifteen Months    Sleigh Journey by Dr  Nansen and Lieut  Johansen  Complete

Unseen and untrodden under their spotless mantle of ice the rigid polar regions slept the profound sleep of death from the earliest dawn of time. Wrapped in his white shroud, the mighty giant stretched his clammy ice-limbs abroad, and dreamed his age-long dreams. Ages passed—deep was the silence. Then, in the dawn of history, far away in the south, the awakening spirit of man reared its head on high and gazed over the earth. To the south it encountered warmth, to the north, cold; and behind the boundaries of the unknown it placed in imagination the twin kingdoms of consuming heat and of deadly cold. But the limits of the unknown had to recede step by step before the ever-increasing yearning after light and knowledge of the human mind, till they made a stand in the north at the threshold of Nature’s great Ice Temple of the polar regions with their endless silence. Up to this point no insuperable obstacles had opposed the progress of the advancing hosts, which confidently proceeded on their way. But here the ramparts of ice and the long darkness of winter brought them to bay. Host after host marched on towards the north, only to suffer defeat. Fresh ranks stood ever ready to advance over the bodies of their predecessors. Shrouded in fog lay the mythic land of Nivlheim, where the “Rimturser”1 carried on their wild gambols. Why did we continually return to the attack? There in the darkness and cold stood Helheim, where the death-goddess held her sway; there lay Nåstrand, the shore of corpses. Thither, where no living being could draw breath, thither troop after troop made its way. To what end? Was it to bring home the dead, as did Hermod when he rode after Baldur? No! It was simply to satisfy man’s thirst for knowledge. Nowhere, in truth, has knowledge been purchased at greater cost of privation and suffering. But the spirit of mankind will never rest till every spot of these regions has been trodden by the foot of man, till every enigma has been solved. Minute by minute, degree by degree, we have stolen forward, with painful effort. Slowly the day has approached; even now we are but in its early dawn; darkness still broods over vast tracts around the Pole. Our ancestors, the old Vikings, were the first Arctic voyagers. It has been said that their expeditions to the frozen sea were of no moment, as they have left no enduring marks behind them. This, however, is scarcely correct. Just as surely as the whalers of our age, in their persistent struggles with ice and sea, form our outposts of investigation up in the north, so were the old Northmen, with Eric the Red, Leif, and others at their head, the pioneers of the polar expeditions of future generations.

Farthest North

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations.

Farthest North

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. To ensure a quality reading experience, this work has been proofread and republished using a format that seamlessly blends the original graphical elements with text in an easy-to-read typeface. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

The Farthest North of Humanness

Letters of Percy Grainger, 1901-1914 Percy Grainger Kay Dreyfus. ****** ------------- s-, , , , , ,~~~~--~~~~. ------------||-- - -|-- o ! The Farthest North of Humanness “To give way to human.

The Farthest North of Humanness


Farthest North

When it became clear that they would miss the pole, Nansen and companion Hjalmar Johansen struck off by themselves. Racing the shrinking pack-ice, they attempted, by dog-sled, to go "farthest north.

Farthest North

"If Outside magazine had been around during the first turn of the century, Fridtjof Nansen would have been its No. 1 cover boy."—The Chicago Sun-Times In September of 1893, Norwegian zoologist Fridtjof Nansen and crew manned the schooner Fram, intending to drift, frozen in the Arctic pack-ice, to the North Pole. When it became clear that they would miss the pole, Nansen and companion Hjalmar Johansen struck off by themselves. Racing the shrinking pack-ice, they attempted, by dog-sled, to go "farthest north." They survived a winter in a moss hut eating walruses and polar bears, and the public assumed they were dead. In the spring of 1896, after three years of trekking, and having made it to within four degrees of the pole, they returned to safety. Nansen's narrative stands with the best writing on polar exploration. 20 b/w photographs. Skyhorse Publishing, along with our Arcade, Good Books, Sports Publishing, and Yucca imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. Our list includes biographies on well-known historical figures like Benjamin Franklin, Nelson Mandela, and Alexander Graham Bell, as well as villains from history, such as Heinrich Himmler, John Wayne Gacy, and O. J. Simpson. We have also published survivor stories of World War II, memoirs about overcoming adversity, first-hand tales of adventure, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Farthest North

Reproduction of the original: Farthest North by Fridtjof Nansen

Farthest North

Reproduction of the original: Farthest North by Fridtjof Nansen

Ice Ship

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 10 12 13 Sverdrup, in his section of Farthest North, II:553. Sverdrup, in his section of Farthest North, II:620–22. Sverdrup, in his section of Farthest North, II:625.

Ice Ship

In the golden age of polar exploration (from the mid-1800s to the early 1900s), many an expedition set out to answer the big questionÑwas the Arctic a continent, an open ocean beyond a barrier of ice, or an ocean covered with ice? No one knew, for the ice had kept its secret well; ships trying to penetrate it all failed, often catastrophically. NorwayÕs charismatic scientist-explorer Fridtjof Nansen, convinced that it was a frozen ocean, intended to prove it in a novel if risky way: by building a ship capable of withstanding the ice, joining others on an expedition, then drifting wherever it took them, on a relentless one-way journey into discovery and fame . . . or oblivion. Ice Ship is the story of that extraordinary ship, the Fram, from conception to construction, through twenty years of three epic expeditions, to its final resting place as a museum. It is also the story of the extraordinary men who steered the Fram over the course of 84,000 miles: on a three-year, ice-bound drift, finding out what the Arctic really was; in a remarkable four-year exploration of unmapped lands in the vast Canadian Arctic; and on a twoÐyear voyage to Antarctica, where another famous Norwegian explorer, Roald Amundsen, claimed the South Pole. Ice Ship will appeal to all those fascinated with polar exploration, maritime adventure, and wooden ships, and will captivate readers of such books as The Endurance, In the Heart of the Sea, and The Last Place on Earth. With more than 100 original photographs, the book brings the Fram to life and light.

Fridtjof Nansen s Farthest North

FARTHEST NORTH : BEING THE NARRATIVE OF THE VOYAGE AND EXPLORA . TION OF THE FRAM 1893-96 AND THE FIFTEEN MONTHS ' SLEDGE EXPEDITION BY DR . NANSEN AND LIEUT . JOHANSEN WITH AN APPENDIX BY OTTO SVERDRUP . CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTION .

Fridtjof Nansen s  Farthest North


Farthest North Illustrated

In 1893 Fridtjof Nansen set sail for the North Pole in the Fram, a ship specially designed to be frozen into the polar ice cap, withstand its crushing pressures, and travel north with the sea's drift.

Farthest North  Illustrated

In 1893 Fridtjof Nansen set sail for the North Pole in the Fram, a ship specially designed to be frozen into the polar ice cap, withstand its crushing pressures, and travel north with the sea's drift. Experts said that such a ship couldn't be built and that the mission was tantamount to suicide. Farthest North, first published in 1897 to great popular acclaim, is the stirring, first-person account of the Fram and her historic voyage. Nansen tells of his expedition's struggle against snowdrifts, ice floes, polar bears, scurvy, gnawing hunger, and the seemingly endless polar night that transformed the Fram into a "cold prison of loneliness." Once it became clear that the Fram could drift no farther, Nansen and crew member Hjalmar Johansen set out on a harrowing fifteen-month sledge journey to reach their destination by foot, which required them to share a sleeping bag of rotting reindeer fur and to feed the weaker sled dogs to the stronger ones. In the end they traveled 146 miles farther north than any Westerner had gone before, representing the greatest single gain in polar exploration in four centuries.

Farthest North

First published in 1897, this two-volume travel account chronicles Fridtjof Nansen's unsuccessful expedition to the North Pole.

Farthest North

First published in 1897, this two-volume travel account chronicles Fridtjof Nansen's unsuccessful expedition to the North Pole.

Farthest North

Farthest North


Farthest North

Given up for dead, he traveled 146 miles farther north than anyone else in the past 400 years. This edition is abridged from the two original volumes.

Farthest North

In 1893, Fridtjof Nansen set sail for the North Pole in the Fram, a ship specially designed to be frozen into the Polar ice cap, withstand the pressure of the ice and drift to the Pole. Experts said that such a mission was tantamount to suicide, but this is the first-person account of this historic success. Nansen tell of his expedition's struggle against snowdrifts, ice floes, polar bears, scurvy, gnawing hunger and the seemingly endless polar night that transformed the Fram into a cold prison of loneliness. Setting out in the end on a harrowing 15-month sledge journey to reach his destination by foot, he was required to share a sleeping bag of rotting reindeer fur and to feed the weaker sled dogs to the stronger ones. Given up for dead, he traveled 146 miles farther north than anyone else in the past 400 years. This edition is abridged from the two original volumes.

Farthest North

He is a Man in a Million.' This is the only complete edition in English.

Farthest North

In 1893 Fridtjof Nansen set off on one of the greatest journeys of exploration ever undertaken. The remarkable three-year project involved building a special ship, designed to ride out the savage pressure of the ice, to sail round the north of Russia into the Kara and Laptev Seas and then, using his intuition as to arctic currents, deliberately freeze the ship into the ice to drift towards the North Pole. From the drifting ship, Nansen and one of his men would then, using dog teams, make the last assault towards the North Pole across the pack. Characterised by Nansen's restless and endless innovation, the expedition was to be another in the litany of heroic failures. But its advances in technique, the sheer willpower that drove Nansen and Johansen, first north from the Fram and then south across the melting pack to the uncharted mass of Franz Josef Land, using sledge and kayak, under assault from walrus and polar bear and above all the temperamental and endlessly changing ice, was to light a fire of inspiration that later carried men to both North and South Pole. The first edition of Farthest North sold 40,000 copies in English on publication.One of its reviewers puts it best: 'Two things were very prominent. One was the indomitable faith of the man in himself, and the other the unanimity with which most of the best authorities believed he was going to a living grave.' Nansen had '...made the most conspicuous advance towards the Pole that has ever been made, and almost as great an advance as has been accomplished by all other voyages in the nineteenth century put together...He is a Man in a Million.' This is the only complete edition in English.

Tide Tables Central and Western Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean

Pacific Standard Time of Moon's greatest Declination North and South , and of its Passage over the Equator , for the ... Farthest N. 9 12 On equator , going N. o oo 12 On equator , going S. o 00 15 p . n Farthest N. 28 25 19 6 p . m .

Tide Tables  Central and Western Pacific Ocean and Indian Ocean


Episodes from Farthest North

Episodes from Farthest North


Farthest North

Farthest North


Farthest North

"Farthest North" by Charles Lanman (1819-1895) tells the life story of Lieutenant James Booth Lockwood with focus on the Lady Franklin Bay Expedition, also known as the Greely Arctic Expedition.

Farthest North

"Farthest North" by Charles Lanman (1819-1895) tells the life story of Lieutenant James Booth Lockwood with focus on the Lady Franklin Bay Expedition, also known as the Greely Arctic Expedition. James Booth Lockwood (October 9, 1852 − April 9, 1884) was an American arctic explorer, who led a sledging party on and died during the ill-fated Lady Franklin Bay Expedition.