Fashioning Adultery

This 2002 book provides a major survey of representations of adultery in later seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England.

Fashioning Adultery

This 2002 book provides a major survey of representations of adultery in later seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England. Bringing together a wide variety of literary and legal sources - including sermons, pamphlets, plays, diaries, periodicals, trial reports and the records of marital litigation - it documents a growing diversity in perceptions of marital infidelity in this period, against the backdrop of an explosion in print culture and a decline in the judicial regulation of sexual immorality. In general terms the book charts and explains a gradual transformation of ideas about extra-marital sex, whereby the powerfully established religious argument that adultery was universally a sin became increasingly open to challenge. The book charts significant developments in the idiom in which sexually transgressive behaviour was discussed, showing how evolving ideas of civility and social refinement and new thinking about gender difference influenced assessments of immoral behaviour.

Adultery

David M. Turner, Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex and Civility in England, 1660–1740 (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2002), 184. 12. Moore, “Diverse Definitions,” 221. 13. Law Magazine, quoted in ibid. 14.

Adultery

Despite declining prohibitions on sexual relationships, Americans are nearly unanimous in condemning marital infidelity. Deborah Rhode explores why. She exposes the harms that criminalizing adultery inflicts—including civil lawsuits, job termination, and loss of child custody—and makes a case for repealing laws against adultery and polygamy.

Criminality and the Common Law Imagination in the 18th and 19th Centuries

Turner, Fashioning Adultery, p. 8. Lawrence Stone has described, as an eighteenth-century development, the concept of the “affective marriage,” based on the premise that “the pursuit of happiness, best achieved by domestic affection, ...

Criminality and the Common Law Imagination in the 18th and 19th Centuries

By accessing penal history through the mediator of individual memory authors can be seen to depict the cumulative dialogue between the English common law and its cultural representations across historical time. Offering legal readings of works by authors including Thomas Hardy, Charles Brockden Brown, Charles Dickens, Samuel Richardson, George MacDonald, Charles Kingsley, Alfred Tennyson, Charlotte Bronte, Robert Browning, Henry Fielding and Sir Walter Scott; this book explores this literary phenomenon and its legal significance during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In doing so it argues that the importance of precedent in Anglo-American common law creates a unique discourse of historical legitimacy that shapes both the cultural and official conceptions of criminality itself during this period. Within a Foucauldian framework, the book illustrates how the cultural memory of crime and punishment contribute to the development of formal and informal penal institutions. Key Features:*Generates a new framework for analysing the relationship between individual and cultural narratives, literary texts, and the cumulative "e;truth"e; created by the common law*Provides three case studies of adultery, child criminality, and rape testimony that demonstrate the impact of cultural narrative on legal development in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.*Legal readings of works by authors including Thomas Hardy, Charles Brockden Brown, Charles Dickens, Samuel Richardson, George MacDonald, Charles Kingsley, Alfred Tennyson, Charlotte Bront Robert Browning, Henry Fielding, Sir Walter Scott *Transformative readings of widely read works including Charles Brockden Brown's Wieland and Ormond, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Charles Kingsley's The Water-Babies, Alfred Tennyson's Idylls of the King, Charlotte Bronts Jayne Eyre, Henry Fielding's The Modern Husband and Sir Walter Scott 's Heart of Midlothian

Histories of Crime

Turner, Fashioning Adultery, 5. Weeks, Sex, Politics and Society, 83. S. Redmayne (1993) 'The Matrimonial Causes Act 1937: A Lesson in the Art of Compromise', Oxford Journal ofLegal Studies, 13:2, 183–200 and J. Lewis and P. Wallis ...

Histories of Crime

Providing a rounded and coherent history of crime and the law spanning the past 400 years, Histories of Crime explores the evolution of attitudes towards crime and criminality over time. Bringing together contributions from internationally acknowledged experts, the book highlights themes, current issues and key debates in the history of deviance and bad behaviour, including: ■ marital cruelty and adultery ■ infanticide ■ murder ■ the underworld ■ blasphemy and moral crimes ■ fraud and white-collar crime ■ the death penalty and punishment. Individual case studies of violent and non-violent crime are used to explore the human means and motives behind criminal practice. Through these, the book illuminates society's wider attitudes and fears about criminal behaviour and the way in which these influence the law and legal system over time. This fascinating book is essential reading for students and teachers of history, sociology and criminology, as well as anyone interested in Britain's criminal past.

Adultery Is Universal

Turner, David, Fashioning Adultery Gender Sex and Civility in England 1660-1740. Swansea University. 2002. Web. <http://swansea.academia.edu>. Chapter Six Berger, Susan. About Affairs. About Affairs.com. 2011.

Adultery Is Universal

This looks ultra exciting -- fascinating and very well organized. It's a book I would absolutely buy. When I encountered infidelity in my marriage, I searched at length for helpful literature. Your book would have jumped off the shelf. Linda B. Spiritual Philosophy Teacher This engaging and entertaining book delivers powerful stories and insightful tools to empower couples to achieve extraordinary success. An essential instruction manual for intimate relationships. David Krueger MD, Executive Mentor Coach Author, The Secret Language of Money www.MentorPath.com Nearly half of all Americans think marriage is obsolete. Marrying another person, uniting legally with commitment, has usually been the basis for the formation of families. Traditional marriage and family life is still desired by the majority of our society and most Americans believe that being faithful to one's spouse is required and expected. Still, infidelity happens... and often. If you picked up this book and are having an affair, in an exclusive relationship, have been betrayed by your partner, plan on being married, have secret conversations with someone you met online, worry about couples cheating as the norm today, this book is for you. An issue splashed across the media virtually every day, occurring in both celebrity and private lives, it is the right time to address marriage, committed relationships, extra-marital affairs, cybersex, communication problems, the evolution of women in society as it relates to marriage, and our American sexualized society today. Rica Gold, Ph.D., formally practiced as a licensed Marriage Family Therapist for more than twenty years and hosted her own live radio and television shows. She is currently the owner of Clear Transitions, Life and Wellness Coaching, providing individual and group coaching to both the business and private sector. An online college instructor in Communication Studies, she is also a provider for the Board of Behavioral Science, authoring Continuation Education courses to mental health professionals. Professional teleseminars, public speaking and free-lance writing are among her engaging activities. Gold lives in California.

Fashioning Childhood in the Eighteenth Century

Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex and Civility, 1660-1740. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Ulmann, Jacques. 1967. Les Débuts de la médecine des enfants. Paris: Palais de la Découverte. Underwood, Michael. 1784.

Fashioning Childhood in the Eighteenth Century

This innovative collection of essays re-examines conventional ideas of the history of childhood, exploring the child's increasing prominence in eighteenth-century discourse and the establishment of the category of age as a marker of social distinction alongside race, class and gender. While scholars often approach childhood within the context of a single nation, this collection takes a comparative approach, examining the child in British, German and French contexts and demonstrating the mutual influences between the Continent and Great Britain in the conceptualization of childhood. Covering a wide range of subjects, from scientific and educational discourses on the child and controversies over the child's legal status and leisure activities, to the child as artist and consumer, the essays shed light on well-known novels like Tristram Shandy and Tom Jones, as well as on less-familiar texts such as periodicals, medical writings, trial reports and schoolbooks. Articles on visual culture show how eighteenth-century discourses on childhood are reflected in representations of the child by illustrators and portraitists. The international group of contributors, including Peter Borsay, Patricia Crown, Bernadette Fort, Brigitte Glaser, Klaus Peter Jochum, Dorothy Johnson and Peter Sabor, represent the disciplines of history, literature and art and reflect the collection's commitment to interdisciplinarity. The volume's unique range of topics makes it essential reading for students and scholars concerned with the history and representation of childhood in eighteenth-century culture.

Marie Antoinette s World

Intrigue, Infidelity, and Adultery in Versailles Will Bashor ... Witnessing such illicit acts: David M. Turner, Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex and Civility (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), ...

Marie Antoinette s World

This riveting book explores the little-known intimate life of Marie Antoinette and her milieu in a world filled with intrigue, infidelity, adultery, and sexually transmitted diseases. Will Bashor reveals the intrigue and debauchery of the Bourbon kings from Louis XIII to Louis XV, which were closely intertwined with the expansion of Versailles from a simple hunting lodge to a luxurious and intricately ordered palace. It soon became a retreat for scandalous conspiracies and rendezvous—all hidden from the public eye. When Marie Antoinette arrived, she was quickly drawn into a true viper's nest, encouraged by her imprudent entourage. Bashor shows that her often thoughtless, fantasy-driven, and notorious antics were inevitable given her family history and the alluring influences that surrounded her. Marie Antoinette's frivolous and flamboyant lifestyle prompted a torrent of scathing pamphlets, and Bashor scrutinizes the queen's world to discover what was false, what was possible, and what, although shocking, was most probably true. Readers will be fascinated by this glimpse behind the decorative screens to learn the secret language of the queen’s fan and explore the dark passageways and staircases of endless intrigue at Versailles.

Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century

G. Towerson, A Explication of the Decalogue of the Ten Commandments, with Reference to the Catechism of the Church of England, London: J. Macock, 1676, cited in Turner, Fashioning Adultery, p. 27. Joanne Begiato (Bailey), Unquiet Lives, ...

Sex and the Church in the Long Eighteenth Century

The Long Eighteenth Century was the Age of Revolutions, including the first sexual revolution. In this era, sexual toleration began and there was a marked increase in the discussion of morality, extra-marital sex, pornography and same-sex relationships in both print and visual culture media. William Gibson and Joanne Begiato here consider the ways in which the Church of England dealt with sex and sexuality in this period. Despite the backdrop of an increasingly secularising society, religion continued to play a key role in politics, family life and wider society and the eighteenth-century Church was still therefore a considerable force, especially in questions of morality. This book integrates themes of gender and sexuality into a broader understanding of the Church of England in the eighteenth century. It shows that, rather than distancing itself from sex through diminishing teaching, regulation and punishment, the Church not only paid attention to it, but its attitudes to sex and sexuality were at the core of society's reactions to the first sexual revolution.

Transgressive Theatricality Romanticism and Mary Wollstonecraft

"3 See Fashioning Adultery, 172, for a nice summary of sources for these accounts. '9 Sarah Lloyd, “Amour in the Shrubbery: Reading the Detail of English Adultery Trial Publications of the l780s,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 39.4 (2006): ...

Transgressive Theatricality  Romanticism  and Mary Wollstonecraft

Throughout her works, Mary Wollstonecraft interrogates and represents the connected network of theater, culture, and self-representation, in what Lisa Plummer Crafton argues is a conscious appropriation of theater in its literal, cultural, and figurative dimensions. Situating Wollstonecraft within early Romantic debates about theatricality, she explores Wollstonecraft's appropriation of, immersion in, and contributions to these debates within the contexts of philosophical arguments about the utility of theater and spectacle; the political discourse of the French Revolution; juridical transcripts of treason and civil divorce trials; and the spectacle of the female actress in performance, as typified by Sarah Siddons and her compelling connections to Wollstonecraft on and off stage. As she considers Wollstonecraft's contributions to competing notions of the theatrical, from the writer's earliest literary reviews and translations through her histories, correspondence, nonfiction, and novels, Crafton traces the trajectory of Wollstonecraft's conscious appropriation of the trope and her emphasis on theatricality's transgressive potential for self-invention. Crafton's book, the first wide-ranging study of theatricality in the works of Wollstonecraft, is an important contribution to current reconsiderations of the earlier received wisdom about Romantic anti-theatricality, to historicist revisions of the performance and theory of Sarah Siddons, and to theories of spectacle and gender.

The Ends of Life

Harry C. Payne, 11 (Madison, 1982); Lawrence Stone, Road to Divorce (Oxford, 1990), ch. ix; David M. Turner, Fashioning Adultery (Cambridge, 2002), ch. 6. 53. G. R. Quaife, Wanton Wenches and Wayward Wives (1979), 142; Elizabeth Foyster ...

The Ends of Life

How should we live? That question was no less urgent for English men and women who lived between the early sixteenth and late eighteenth centuries than for this book's readers. Keith Thomas's masterly exploration of the ways in which people sought to lead fulfilling lives in those centuries between the beginning of the Reformation and the heyday of the Enlightenment illuminates the central values of the period, while casting incidental light on some of the perennial problems of human existence. Consideration of the origins of the modern ideal of human fulfilment and of obstacles to its realization in the early modern period frames an investigation that ranges from work, wealth, and possessions to the pleasures of friendship, family, and sociability. The cult of military prowess, the pursuit of honour and reputation, the nature of religious belief and scepticism, and the desire to be posthumously remembered are all drawn into the discussion, and the views and practices of ordinary people are measured against the opinions of the leading philosophers and theologians of the time. The Ends of Life offers a fresh approach to the history of early modern England, by one of the foremost historians of our time. It also provides modern readers with much food for thought on the problem of how we should live and what goals in life we should pursue.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History

Turner, David M. Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex, and Civility in England, 1660–1740. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Analysis of adultery's representation in early modern English culture and society.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History

This encyclopedia captures the experiences of women throughout world history and illuminates how they have influenced and been influenced by these historical, social, and demographic changes. It contains over 1,300 signed articles covering six main areas: biographies; geography and history; comparative culture and society; organizations and movements; womens and gender studies; and topics in world history.

A Cultural History of Law in the Early Modern Age

... Much Conversant in the Studie of the Lawes of this Realme. London: Company of Stationers, 1618. 62. David M.Turner, Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex and Civility in England 1660–1740. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002, p.

A Cultural History of Law in the Early Modern Age

Opened up by the revival of Classical thought but riven by the violence of the Reformation and Counter Reformation, the terrain of Early Modern law was constantly shifting. The age of expansion saw unparalleled degrees of internal and external exploration and colonization, accompanied by the advance of science and the growing power of knowledge. A Cultural History of Law in the Early Modern Age, covering the period from 1500 to 1680, explores the war of jurisdictions and the slow and contested emergence of national legal traditions in continental Europe and in Britannia. Most particularly, the chapters examine the European quality of the Western legal traditions and seek to link the political project of Anglican common law, the mos britannicus, to its classical European language and context. Drawing upon a wealth of textual and visual sources, A Cultural History of Law in the Early Modern Age presents essays that examine key cultural case studies of the period on the themes of justice, constitution, codes, agreements, arguments, property and possession, wrongs, and the legal profession.

Marriage in Ireland 1660 1925

Adultery. and. Sex. outside. Marriage. Dr Philip Cross, a retired army surgeon, was convicted of poisoning his wife in 1887.1 The Crosses ... See, for instance, David M. Turner, Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex and Civility in England, ...

Marriage in Ireland  1660   1925

What were the laws on marriage in Ireland, and did church and state differ in their interpretation? How did men and women meet and arrange to marry? How important was patriarchy and a husband's control over his wife? And what were the options available to Irish men and women who wished to leave an unhappy marriage? This first comprehensive history of marriage in Ireland across three centuries looks below the level of elite society for a multi-faceted exploration of how marriage was perceived, negotiated and controlled by the church and state, as well as by individual men and women within Irish society. Making extensive use of new and under-utilised primary sources, Maria Luddy and Mary O'Dowd explain the laws and customs around marriage in Ireland. Revising current understandings of marital law and relations, Marriage in Ireland, 1660–1925 represents a major new contribution to Irish historical studies.

Atlantic Worlds in the Long Eighteenth Century

David M. Turner, Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex and Civility in England, 1660–1740 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), chap. 1; Ellen Pollak, Incestand the EnglishNovel, 1684–1814 (Baltimore,MD: Johns Hopkins University ...

Atlantic Worlds in the Long Eighteenth Century

Innovative and multidisciplinary, this collection of essays marks out the future of Atlantic Studies, making visible the emphases and purposes now emerging within this vital comparative field. The contributors model new ways to understand the unexpected roles that seduction stories and sentimental narratives played for readers struggling to negotiate previously unimagined differences between and among people, institutions, and ideas.

Aristocratic Vice

Adultery from the Glorious Revolution to the Reign of George III In his fine book Fashioning Adultery, David Turner has very persuasively argued that, though adultery was by no means a new vice in Restoration England, there was a new ...

Aristocratic Vice

div Aristocratic Vice examines the outrage against the four vices associated with the aristocracy in eighteenth-century England—duelling, suicide, adultery, and gambling—and the subsequent emergence of the middle class./DIV

Books on Early American History and Culture 2001 2005 An Annotated Bibliography

269 Turner, David M. Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex, and Civility in England, 1660–1740. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. xii, 236 p. ISBN 0521792444; ISBN 9780521792448; OCLC 49248519; LC Call Number HQ806 .

Books on Early American History and Culture  2001   2005  An Annotated Bibliography

This volume offers a complete listing and description of books published on early America between 2001 and 2005. • The book is organized thematically to facilitate research • Extensive author indexes and guides to important works for the time period are provided • The most important books in each subject (e.g., gender, politics) are enumerated based on frequency of citation

Anna of Saxony

Fashioning Adultery (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002), p. 57. 3Brundage, p. 60, p. 72, p. 520. 4Camille, p. 89. 5Georgina Dopico Black. Perfect Wives, Other Women (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2001), p. 114.

Anna of Saxony

Since her early youth at the glittering court of Dresden, Anna had been known as a difficult child and troublemaker. Servants complained about her violent outbursts, while courtiers bemoaned her general disregard for aristocratic female etiquette. Upon reaching her teenage years, the princess’ guardians decided that Saxony’s enfant terrible should leave home as quickly as possible by marrying a foreign suitor in a preferably far-away land. Enter William of Orange: handsome, charming, and heir to one of the Netherlands’ largest estates. The fact that he was also a profligate partier and lover of women was conveniently overlooked. Anna immediately fell for the Dutch bon vivant despite warnings from a few well-meaning relatives. For one, William was a Catholic, while Anna adhered to the Protestant teachings of Martin Luther, critical voices cautioned, correctly predicting future trouble for the princess in the Catholic Netherlands. Furthermore, the prince’s liege lord, the fanatical Philip II of Spain, very much disapproved of a match between his premier vassal and a “Lutheran heretic.” There was also the issue of plain Anna’s growing obsession with the roguish William; an obsession that was not reciprocated. In the end, the impetuous princess threw caution to the wind. No other than William would do for a husband, she insisted, while publicly announcing that “every vein in my body heartily loves him.”

Courtship Marriage and Marriage Breakdown

... Beverly Schwartzberg, ' “Lots of Them Did That”: Desertion, Bigamy, and Marital Fluidity in LateNineteenth-Century America,' Journal of Social History 37, no. 3 (2004): 573–600; David Turner, Fashioning Adultery: Gender, ...

Courtship  Marriage and Marriage Breakdown

This book explores the history of marriage and marriage-like relationships across five continents from the seventeenth century to the present day. Across fourteen chapters, leading marriage scholars examine how the methodologies from the new history of emotions contribute to our understanding of marriage, seeking to uncover not only personal feeling but also the political and social implications of emotion. They highlight how marriage as an institution has been shaped not just by law and society but also by individual and community choices, desires and emotional values. Importantly, they also emphasize how the history of non-traditional and same-sex relationships and their emotions have long played an important role in determining the nature of marriage as an institution and emotional union. In doing so, this collection allows us to rethink both the past and present of marriage, destabilizing a story of a stable institution and opening it up as a site of contest, debate and feeling.

The Extraordinary and the Everyday in Early Modern England

Ibid., Q (11–18 July 1676); see also D.M. Turner, Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex and Civility in England 1660–1740 (Cambridge, 2002), 93–4. Gowing, Domestic Dangers, 103–4; V. Groebner, 'Losing face, saving face: noses, ...

The Extraordinary and the Everyday in Early Modern England

A fascinating collection of essays by renowned and emerging scholars exploring how everyday matters from farting to friendship reveal extraordinary aspects of early modern life, while seemingly exceptional acts and beliefs – such as those of ghosts, prophecies, and cannibalism – illuminate something of the routine experience of ordinary people.

Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature before Heterosexuality

Turner, David M. Fashioning Adultery: Gender, Sex and Civility in England, 1660–1740. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Turner, James Grantham. “The Sexual Politics of Landscape: Images of Venus in Eighteenth-Century Poetry ...

Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature before Heterosexuality

Shakespeare has been misread for centuries as having modern ideas about sex and gender.This book shows how in the Restoration and Eighteenth century, Shakespeare's plays and other Renaissance texts were adapted to make them conform to these modern ideas.Through readings of Shakespearean texts, including King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, and Othello, and other Renaissance drama, the book reveals a sexual world before heterosexuality. Shakespeare and Renaissance Literature Before Heterosexuality shows how revisions and criticism of Renaissance drama contributed to the emergence of heterosexuality.It also shows how changing ideas about status, adultery, friendship, and race were factors in that emergence.