Faulkner and History

Monday's program began with Charles A. Peek and Terrell L. Tebbetts leading the first “Teaching Faulkner” session, “Whose Faulkner and Whose History?,” and a panel titled “Histories of Labor and Technology” followed, with Deborah Clarke ...

Faulkner and History

William Faulkner remains a historian's writer. A distinguished roster of historians have referenced Faulkner in their published work. They are drawn to him as a fellow historian, a shaper of narrative reflections on the meaning of the past; as a historiographer, a theorist, and dramatist of the fraught enterprise of doing history; and as a historical figure himself, especially following his mid-century emergence as a public intellectual after winning the Nobel Prize for Literature. This volume brings together historians and literary scholars to explore the many facets of Faulkner's relationship to history: the historical contexts of his novels and stories; his explorations of the historiographic imagination; his engagement with historical figures from both the regional and national past; his influence on professional historians; his pursuit of alternate modes of temporal awareness; and the histories of print culture that shaped the production, reception, and criticism of Faulkner's work. Contributors draw on the history of development in the Mississippi Valley, the construction of Confederate memory, the history and curriculum of Harvard University, twentieth-century debates over police brutality and temperance reform, the history of modern childhood, and the literary histories of anti-slavery writing and pulp fiction to illuminate Faulkner's work. Others in the collection explore the meaning of Faulkner's fiction for such professional historians as C. Vann Woodward and Albert Bushnell Hart. In these ways and more, Faulkner and History offers fresh insights into one of the most persistent and long-recognized elements of the Mississippian's artistic vision.

A William Faulkner Encyclopedia

178 " HOG PAWN ” The social , historical , and political affairs of the South formed the background against which Faulkner presents his works . He breaks the basic traditional plot continuity , syntax and coherence of language ...

A William Faulkner Encyclopedia

In a distillation of the extensive research on William Faulkner and his work, Hamblin and Peek's book is an authoritative guide to the author's life, literature, and legacy. Arranged alphabetically, the entries in this reference discuss Faulkner's works and major characters and themes, as well as the literary and cultural contexts in which his texts were conceived, written, and published. There are also entries for relatives, friends, and other persons important to Faulkner's biography; historical events, persons, and places; social and cultural developments; and literary and philosophical terms and movements. Entries are written by expert contributors and most provide bibliographic information for further study. The volume closes with a bibliography and detailed index.

A Companion to Faulkner Studies

Godden scrupulously renders the details of the labor history he considers relevant to Faulkner's fiction , and this vantage point produces new visions of works we thought we understood [ see chapter 7 ] . The list of essays treating ...

A Companion to Faulkner Studies

Individual chapters by expert contributors survey and evaluate critical approaches to Faulkner's works.

William Faulkner and Southern History

Equally important, Williamson uses these stories to underscore themes of race, class, economics, politics, religion, sex and violence, idealism and Romanticism--"the rainbow of elements in human culture"--that reappear in Faulkner's work.

William Faulkner and Southern History

One of America's great novelists, William Faulkner was a writer deeply rooted in the American South. In works such as The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Light in August, and Absalom, Absalom! Faulkner drew powerfully on Southern themes, attitudes, and atmosphere to create his own world and place--the mythical Yoknapatawpha County--peopled with quintessential Southerners such as the Compsons, Sartorises, Snopes, and McCaslins. Indeed, to a degree perhaps unmatched by any other major twentieth-century novelist, Faulkner remained at home and explored his own region--the history and culture and people of the South. Now, in William Faulkner and Southern History, one of America's most acclaimed historians of the South, Joel Williamson, weaves together a perceptive biography of Faulkner himself, an astute analysis of his works, and a revealing history of Faulkner's ancestors in Mississippi--a family history that becomes, in Williamson's skilled hands, a vivid portrait of Southern culture itself. Williamson provides an insightful look at Faulkner's ancestors, a group sketch so brilliant that the family comes alive almost as vividly as in Faulkner's own fiction. Indeed, his ancestors often outstrip his characters in their colorful and bizarre nature. Williamson has made several discoveries: the Falkners (William was the first to spell it "Faulkner") were not planter, slaveholding "aristocrats"; Confederate Colonel Falkner was not an unalloyed hero, and he probably sired, protected, and educated a mulatto daughter who married into America's mulatto elite; Faulkner's maternal grandfather Charlie Butler stole the town's money and disappeared in the winter of 1887-1888, never to return. Equally important, Williamson uses these stories to underscore themes of race, class, economics, politics, religion, sex and violence, idealism and Romanticism--"the rainbow of elements in human culture"--that reappear in Faulkner's work. He also shows that, while Faulkner's ancestors were no ordinary people, and while he sometimes flashed a curious pride in them, Faulkner came to embrace a pervasive sense of shame concerning both his family and his culture. This he wove into his writing, especially about sex, race, class, and violence, psychic and otherwise. William Faulkner and Southern History represents an unprecedented publishing event--an eminent historian writing on a major literary figure. By revealing the deep history behind the art of the South's most celebrated writer, Williamson evokes new insights and deeper understanding, providing anyone familiar with Faulkner's great novels with a host of connections between his work, his life, and his ancestry.

The Weekly Dispatch Versus Faulkner s History of Chelsea

Thomas Faulkner. THE HISTORY OF CHELSEA . 11 Sir Walter Scott has beautifully and naturally exhibited their union in the person of his “ Antiquary . ” But allowing that the work in question is occasionally pedantic , we do not therefore ...

The    Weekly Dispatch    Versus    Faulkner s History of Chelsea


Faulkner s History of the Revolution in the Southern States

Xos & o ROSENT 29 FAULKNER'S History of the Revolution IN THE SOUTHERN STATES ; INCLUDING u55372.26 The Special Messages of President Buchanan - The Ordinances of Secession of the Six Withdrawing States - Preliminary Steps taken ...

Faulkner s History of the Revolution in the Southern States


Faulkner s County

The Historical Roots of Yoknapatawpha Don Harrison Doyle. into Legend , video , directed by Robert Oesterling , script by Evans Harrington , 1965 ; Arthur F. Kinney , ed . , Critical Essays on William Faulkner : The Compson Family ...

Faulkner s County

This history of Lafayette County, Mississippi, uses William Faulkner's rich fictional portrait of a place and its people to illuminate the past. From the arrival of Europeans in Chickasaw Indian territory in 1540 to Faulkner's death in 1962, Doyle chronicles more than four centuries of local history. 27 illustrations. 3 maps.

William Faulkner

All of this has a bearing on Faulkner's sense of history . For him , the Civil War seemed a living memory in which he had not directly participated but which was his nevertheless . Let us grant that Faulkner sometimes gets the date of a ...

William Faulkner

In this companion volume to William Faulkner: The Yoknapatawpha Country, Cleanth Brooks takes an in-depth look at Faulkner's early poetry and prose as well as his five non-Yoknapatawpha novels -- Soldiers Pay, Mosquitoes, Pylon, The Wild Palms, and A Fable. Brooks also offers relevant clarification of some of his earlier interpretations of Faulkner that have been challenged -- most notably in the case of Faulkner that have been challenged -- most notable in the case of Absalom, Absalom!, which he considers Faulkner's greatest novel. Recognizing that the creative and imaginative center of Faulkner's art is Yoknapatawpha County, Brooks examines the merits of each of the works set beyond these boundaries and explores how these writings complement Faulkner as an artist. He sheds light on the literary sources that influenced Faulkner's early work and the technical innovations and general themes Faulkner was to develop in his later writing. The notes and appendixes with which Brooks concludes Toward Yoknapatawpha and Beyond serve only to amplify this comprehensive study.

The Biblical View of History Hawthorne Mark Twain Faulkner and Eliot

... Faulkner, and Eliot are "Celvinista." Such, in fact, has been the judgment of numerous critics who have special* aod in their work. One final "unscientific" observation arises from the study. As these writers look at history's ...

The Biblical View of History  Hawthorne  Mark Twain  Faulkner  and Eliot


Natural Aristocracy

Looks at the relationship between American history and William Faulkner's works, and between southern history and Faulkner's subjectivity. Reprint.

Natural Aristocracy

Looks at the relationship between American history and William Faulkner's works, and between southern history and Faulkner's subjectivity. Reprint.

On The Prejudices Predilections and Firm Beliefs of William Faulkner

Faulkner and History A people without history Is not redeemed from time, for history is a pattem Of timeless moments. —T. S. Eliot . . . the dream of the future is not Better than the fact of the past, no matter how terrible.

On The Prejudices  Predilections  and Firm Beliefs of William Faulkner

It seems appropriate, if not inevitable, that one of our best critics should be the foremost authority on one of our best novelists. Cleanth Brooks, the author of three seminal studies of William Faulkner, has been a serious student of that master craftsman's fiction for more than four decades. In this new collection, Brooks considers many of the important characteristics of Faulkner's work. He focuses more specifically than he has in the past on certain questions and in some instances offers rebuttals to what he considered unfair assessments of Faulkner. In the first essay, Brooks challenges the notion that Donald Davidson, John Crowe Ransom, Robert Penn Warren, and other members of the Fugitive-Agrarian movement at Vanderbilt University were slow to recognize Faulkner's achievements. Indeed, Brooks provides clear evidence not only that the Fugitives were early supporters of Faulkner but that Faulkner and the Fugitives shared many concerns and ideas about their region. Brooks also writes about Faulkner's personal beliefs and demonstrates how the virtues Faulkner held in highest esteem -- such as courage and honor -- are embodied in his fiction. In two essays, "Faulkner and the Community" and "Faulkner's Two Cities," Brooks analyzes the importance of a closely knit world -- specifically the hill region of north Mississippi and the cities of Memphis and New Orleans -- to Faulkner's works. Brooks considers Faulkner's serious regard for the chivalric tradition, as well as his amusement in Gavin Stevens' exemplification of it in Intruder in the Dust and Requiem for a Nun. Faulkner's treatment of women characters, especially in Light in August and The Hamlet, is discussed, as are his ideas about the American Dream. These essays are vintage Brooks. The prose is, as always, felicitous, the manner modest and winning, the thought pertinent and rigorous. Despite the thematic diversity of the essays, the emphasis is ultimately the same: reading and rereading the novels of William Faulkner is a continuing pleasure and an enduring challenge.

William Faulkner s Absalom Absalom

“William Faulkner's Style,”American Prefaces, VI (Spring 1941), 195–211; frequently reprinted, ... Sutpen is a gnostic who finds history meaningless; he has confidence that he can change the present and create a future.

William Faulkner s  Absalom  Absalom

Originally published in 1984. William Faulkner is the most studied American author of our time. This volume presents a collection of some of the best critical essays on William Faulkner’s ninth novel Absalom, Absalom!. Numerous approaches are represented; among them are theme studies, close readings, psychological studies, source studies, structural studies, and analyses of style and narrative technique.

Faulkner and the Native South

See also Claudio Saunt, “Telling Stories: The Political Uses of Myth and History in the Cherokee and Creek Nations,” ... Don H. Doyle, Faulkner's Country: The Historical Roots of Yoknapatawpha (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina ...

Faulkner and the Native South

Contributions by Eric Gary Anderson, Melanie R. Anderson, Jodi A. Byrd, Gina Caison, Robbie Ethridge, Patricia Galloway, LeAnne Howe, John Wharton Lowe, Katherine M. B. Osburn, Melanie Benson Taylor, Annette Trefzer, and Jay Watson From new insights into the Chickasaw sources and far-reaching implications of Faulkner’s fictional place-name “Yoknapatawpha,” to discussions that reveal the potential for indigenous land-, family-, and story-based methodologies to deepen understanding of Faulkner’s fiction (including but not limited to the novels and stories he devoted explicitly to Native American topics), the eleven essays of this volume advance the critical analysis of Faulkner’s Native South and the Native South’s Faulkner. Critics push beyond assessments of the historical accuracy of his Native representations and the colonial hybridity of his Indian characters. Essayists turn instead to indigenous intellectual culture for new models, problems, and questions to bring to Faulkner studies. Along the way, readers are treated to illuminating comparisons between Faulkner’s writings and the work of a number of Native American authors, filmmakers, tribal leaders, and historical figures. Faulkner and the Native South brings together Native and non-Native scholars in a stimulating and often surprising critical dialogue about the indigenous wellsprings of Faulkner’s creative energies and about Faulkner’s own complicated presence in Native American literary history.

Faulkner and History

Faulkner and History


William Faulkner s Absalom Absalom

In Faulkner at 100: Retrospect and Prospect, edited by Donald M. Kartiganer and Ann J. Abadie, 204–18. Jackson: University Press of Mississsippi, 2000. ... “To Cheer the Weary Traveler: Toni Morrison, William Faulkner, and History.

William Faulkner s Absalom  Absalom

Absalom, Absalom! has long been seen as one of William Faulkner's supreme creations, as well as one of the leading American novels of the twentieth century. In this collection Fred Hobson has brought together eight of the most stimulating essays on Absalom, essays written over a thirty-year span which approach the novel both formally and historically. Here are critical responses by Cleanth Brooks, John Irwin, Thadious Davis, and Eric Sundquist, as well as four essays published in the last decade. The casebook concludes with Faulkner's own remarks on the novel, delivered in a discussion with students at the University of Virginia. What emerges from all the selections is a rich and suggestive treatment of a work which Faulkner himself called "the best novel yet written by an American" and a less biased critic has called "the greatest American novel of the century... joining Moby-Dick and Huckleberry Finn at the pinnacle of American fiction."

William Faulkner

“Faun and Pierrot: Faulkner's World Old and New.” Kwansei Gakuin University Annual Studies 43 (March 1994): 57-64. On later uses of two of Faulkner's early figures. Gray, Richard. “Fictions of History: An Approach to Faulkner.

William Faulkner

Considered one of the great American authors of the 20th century, William Faulkner (1897-1962) produced such enduring novels as The Sound and the Fury, Light in August, and As I Lay Dying, as well as many short stories. His works continue to be a source of interest to scholars and students of literature, and the immense amount of criticism about the Nobel-prize winner continues to grow. Following his book Faulkner in the Eighties (Scarecrow, 1991) and two previous volumes published in 1972 and 1983, John E. Bassett provides a comprehensive, annotated listing of commentary in English on William Faulkner since the late 1980s. This volume dedicates its sections to book-length studies of Faulkner, commentaries on individual novels and short works, criticism covering multiple works, biographical and bibliographical sources, and other materials such as book reviews, doctoral dissertations, and brief commentaries. This bibliography provides an organized and accessible list of all significant recent commentary on Faulkner, and the annotations direct readers to those materials of most interest to them. The information contained in this volume is beneficial for scholars and students of this author but also general readers of fiction who have a special interest in Faulkner.

A Companion to William Faulkner

Among the best of the biographical studies after Blotner was William Faulkner and Southern History (1993) by Joel Williamson. Williamson has a solid understanding of regional history, and he brings all of this knowledge to bear on ...

A Companion to William Faulkner

This comprehensive Companion to William Faulkner reflects the current dynamic state of Faulkner studies. Explores the contexts, criticism, genres and interpretations of Nobel Prize-winning writer William Faulkner, arguably the greatest American novelist Comprises newly-commissioned essays written by an international contributor team of leading scholars Guides readers through the plethora of critical approaches to Faulkner over the past few decades Draws upon current Faulkner scholarship, as well as critically reflecting on previous interpretations