Faulkner and Slavery

Faulkner's belief that the past is a living force in the present, slavery at the University of Mississippi is something that we must now examine in its connection with the narrative of Absalom, Absalom! At the University of Mississippi, ...

Faulkner and Slavery

Contributions by Tim Armstrong, Edward A. Chappell, W. Ralph Eubanks, Amy A. Foley, Michael Gorra, Sherita L. Johnson, Andrew B. Leiter, John T. Matthews, Julie Beth Napolin, Erin Penner, Stephanie Rountree, Julia Stern, Jay Watson, and Randall Wilhelm In 1930, the same year he moved into Rowan Oak, a slave-built former plantation home in his hometown of Oxford, Mississippi, William Faulkner published his first work of fiction that gave serious attention to the experience and perspective of an enslaved individual. For the next two decades, Faulkner repeatedly returned to the theme of slavery and to the figures of enslaved people in his fiction, probing the racial, economic, and political contours of his region, nation, and hemisphere in work such as The Sound and the Fury; Light in August; Absalom, Absalom!; and Go Down, Moses. Faulkner and Slavery is the first collection to address the myriad legacies of African chattel slavery in the writings and personal history of one of the twentieth century’s most incisive authors on US slavery and the long ordeal of race in the Americas. Contributors to the volume examine the constitutive links among slavery, capitalism, and modernity across Faulkner’s oeuvre. They study how the history of slavery at the University of Mississippi informs writings like Absalom, Absalom! and trace how slavery’s topologies of the rectilinear grid or square run up against the more reparative geography of the oval in Faulkner’s narratives. Contributors explore how the legacies of slavery literally sound and resound across centuries of history, and across multiple novels and stories in Faulkner’s fictional county of Yoknapatawpha, and they reveal how the author’s remodeling work on his own residence brought him into an uncomfortable engagement with the spatial and architectural legacies of chattel slavery in north Mississippi. Faulkner and Slavery offers a timely intervention not only in the critical study of the writer’s work but in ongoing national and global conversations about the afterlives of slavery and the necessary work of antiracism.

A William Faulkner Encyclopedia

Sartoris may have lost that skirmish , but Drusilla and the former slaves have lost their war for autonomous new roles . ... In Faulkner's works readers are treated to only rare glimpses of the experience of slavery from the slave's ...

A William Faulkner Encyclopedia

In a distillation of the extensive research on William Faulkner and his work, Hamblin and Peek's book is an authoritative guide to the author's life, literature, and legacy. Arranged alphabetically, the entries in this reference discuss Faulkner's works and major characters and themes, as well as the literary and cultural contexts in which his texts were conceived, written, and published. There are also entries for relatives, friends, and other persons important to Faulkner's biography; historical events, persons, and places; social and cultural developments; and literary and philosophical terms and movements. Entries are written by expert contributors and most provide bibliographic information for further study. The volume closes with a bibliography and detailed index.

The South and Faulkner s Yoknapatawph

Yet in such a land , where the red earth seemingly may take its color from the blood spilled , Faulkner presents no instances of physical brutality to slaves — not even those who attempt escape . If one reads slave narratives ...

The South and Faulkner s Yoknapatawph


Faulkner and Slavery

Faulkner and Slavery is the first collection to address the myriad legacies of African chattel slavery in the writings and personal history of one of the twentieth century’s most incisive authors on US slavery and the long ordeal of race ...

Faulkner and Slavery

Contributions by Tim Armstrong, Edward A. Chappell, W. Ralph Eubanks, Amy A. Foley, Michael Gorra, Sherita L. Johnson, Andrew B. Leiter, John T. Matthews, Julie Beth Napolin, Erin Penner, Stephanie Rountree, Julia Stern, Jay Watson, and Randall Wilhelm In 1930, the same year he moved into Rowan Oak, a slave-built former plantation home in his hometown of Oxford, Mississippi, William Faulkner published his first work of fiction that gave serious attention to the experience and perspective of an enslaved individual. For the next two decades, Faulkner repeatedly returned to the theme of slavery and to the figures of enslaved people in his fiction, probing the racial, economic, and political contours of his region, nation, and hemisphere in work such as The Sound and the Fury; Light in August; Absalom, Absalom!; and Go Down, Moses. Faulkner and Slavery is the first collection to address the myriad legacies of African chattel slavery in the writings and personal history of one of the twentieth century’s most incisive authors on US slavery and the long ordeal of race in the Americas. Contributors to the volume examine the constitutive links among slavery, capitalism, and modernity across Faulkner’s oeuvre. They study how the history of slavery at the University of Mississippi informs writings like Absalom, Absalom! and trace how slavery’s topologies of the rectilinear grid or square run up against the more reparative geography of the oval in Faulkner’s narratives. Contributors explore how the legacies of slavery literally sound and resound across centuries of history, and across multiple novels and stories in Faulkner’s fictional county of Yoknapatawpha, and they reveal how the author’s remodeling work on his own residence brought him into an uncomfortable engagement with the spatial and architectural legacies of chattel slavery in north Mississippi. Faulkner and Slavery offers a timely intervention not only in the critical study of the writer’s work but in ongoing national and global conversations about the afterlives of slavery and the necessary work of antiracism.

Faulkner s County

William Faulkner , Absalom , Absalom ! ... Michael Tadman , Speculators and Slaves : Masters , Traders , and Slaves in the Old South ( Madison : University of Wisconsin ... Charles Sackett Sydnor , Slavery in Mississippi ( 1933 ; rpt .

Faulkner s County

This history of Lafayette County, Mississippi, uses William Faulkner's rich fictional portrait of a place and its people to illuminate the past. From the arrival of Europeans in Chickasaw Indian territory in 1540 to Faulkner's death in 1962, Doyle chronicles more than four centuries of local history. 27 illustrations. 3 maps.

The depiction of slavery in William Faulkner s novel Absalom Absalom

Thus, slavery plays an important role in this novel because the Sutpens own a huge plantation in Virginia and hence have slaves to do the work. The attitude towards slavery within the novel is very bad.

The depiction of slavery in William Faulkner s novel  Absalom  Absalom

Essay from the year 2015 in the subject American Studies - Literature, , language: English, abstract: William Faulkner’s novel "Absalom, Absalom!" was first published in 1936 and deals with the problems of the family Sutpen before, during and after the American Civil War. Thus, slavery plays an important role in this novel because the Sutpens own a huge plantation in Virginia and hence have slaves to do the work. The attitude towards slavery within the novel is very bad. The people do not like slaves or coloured people in general and this becomes obvious through several narrators. The Civil War and especially slavery is an important theme in American history. The Civil War lasted from 1861 to 1865 and around 1.1 million people lost their lives in it. The war took place because of the prohibition of slavery in the north of America although it was still allowed in the south where slaves were used for the work on plantations or in the household. Therefore, the prohibition of slavery was a huge contentious issue. Abraham Lincoln was the president of the Union army and thus from the North and Jefferson Davis was the president from the Confederate army from the South. South Carolina was the first state that announced its separation from the United States of America and six other southern states joined them. The bloodiest battle was in Gattysburg in July 1863 where around 51 000 soldiers were killed. This battle was at the same time the turning point in the Civil War because the Union won. After the war it was decided that everyone has a right to vote not depending on colour, religion or any other circumstances what was then the reason why the Ku-Klux-Klan was formed on Christmas Eve 1865.

The Cambridge Companion to Slavery in American Literature

(1936), Faulkner's most sustained examination of slavery and its violence, that incest and hidden origins collide most violently. The elements of the novel – a white woman who wishes to claim her share of the profits and privileges of ...

The Cambridge Companion to Slavery in American Literature

This book brings together leading scholars to examine slavery in American literature from the eighteenth century to the present day.

The Saddest Words William Faulkner s Civil War

Yoknapatawpha's world is violent enough—and yet in writing of the pre-1865 South Faulkner never depicts a slave auction or a ... and the story involves a grotesque visual pun on the biblical curse by which slavery was often justified.

The Saddest Words  William Faulkner s Civil War

How do we read William Faulkner in the twenty-first century? asks Michael Gorra, in this reconsideration of Faulkner's life and legacy. William Faulkner, one of America’s most iconic writers, is an author who defies easy interpretation. Born in 1897 in Mississippi, Faulkner wrote such classic novels as Absolom, Absolom! and The Sound and The Fury, creating in Yoknapatawpha county one of the most memorable gallery of characters ever assembled in American literature. Yet, as acclaimed literary critic Michael Gorra explains, Faulkner has sustained justified criticism for his failures of racial nuance—his ventriloquism of black characters and his rendering of race relations in a largely unreconstructed South—demanding that we reevaluate the Nobel laureate’s life and legacy in the twenty-first century, as we reexamine the junctures of race and literature in works that once rested firmly in the American canon. Interweaving biography, literary criticism, and rich travelogue, The Saddest Words argues that even despite these contradictions—and perhaps because of them—William Faulkner still needs to be read, and even more, remains central to understanding the contradictions inherent in the American experience itself. Evoking Faulkner’s biography and his literary characters, Gorra illuminates what Faulkner maintained was “the South’s curse and its separate destiny,” a class and racial system built on slavery that was devastated during the Civil War and was reimagined thereafter through the South’s revanchism. Driven by currents of violence, a “Lost Cause” romanticism not only defined Faulkner’s twentieth century but now even our own age. Through Gorra’s critical lens, Faulkner’s mythic Yoknapatawpha County comes alive as his imagined land finds itself entwined in America’s history, the characters wrestling with the ghosts of a past that refuses to stay buried, stuck in an unending cycle between those two saddest words, “was” and “again.” Upending previous critical traditions, The Saddest Words returns Faulkner to his sociopolitical context, revealing the civil war within him and proving that “the real war lies not only in the physical combat, but also in the war after the war, the war over its memory and meaning.” Filled with vignettes of Civil War battles and generals, vivid scenes from Gorra’s travels through the South—including Faulkner’s Oxford, Mississippi—and commentaries on Faulkner’s fiction, The Saddest Words is a mesmerizing work of literary thought that recontextualizes Faulkner in light of the most plangent cultural issues facing America today.

Faulkner and Mystery

In “The Old People” Faulkner revises Ikkemotubbe's family tree, designating Moketubbe his cousin. ... Shane and Graham White, “'Us Likes a Mixtery': Listening to AfricanAmerican Slave Music,” Slavery and Abolition 20 (1999): 22–48.

Faulkner and Mystery

Faulkner and Mystery presents a wide spectrum of compelling arguments about the role and function of mystery in William Faulkner’s fiction. Twelve new essays approach the question of what can be known and what remains a secret in the narratives of the Nobel laureate. Scholars debate whether or not Faulkner’s work attempts to solve mysteries or celebrate the enigmas of life and the elusiveness of truth. Scholars scrutinize Faulkner’s use of the contemporary crime and detection genre as well as novels that deepen a plot rather than solve it. Several essays are dedicated to exploring the narrative strategies and ideological functions of Faulkner’s take on the detective story, the classic “whodunit.” Among Faulkner’s novels most interested in the format of detection is Intruder in the Dust, which assumes a central role in this essay collection. Other contributors explore the thickening mysteries of racial and sexual identity, particularly the enigmatic nature of his female and African American characters. Questions of insight, cognition, and judgment in Faulkner’s work are also at the center of essays that explore his storytelling techniques, plot development, and the inscrutability of language itself.

Faulkner s Families

Given the complexity of Faulkner's racial position , it is easier to understand the ambivalence with which he views slavery and , specifically , the slave family . Darwin T. Turner in his article “ Faulkner and Slavery ” draws the ...

Faulkner s Families

This is the first book to show in detail how the families William Faulkner created in his novels reflect his own family experiences. Gwendolyn Chabrier shows how Faulkner's earliest work presents a gloomy view of family relations, characterized by misalliance, adultery, and incestuous relationships. But then, drawing on his own experience, Faulkner gradually came to a new view of the family, both his own and those he created, and worked through to his later novel where both his life and that of his fictional families became more peaceful and rewarding.

William Faulkner in Context

One might suggest that since Ikkemotubbe was the first of his tribe to hold slaves, he amounts to the Man the slaves made, and that, as glimpsed by the slave's complex logic, the slave is of his very substance, and of the substance of ...

William Faulkner in Context

William Faulkner in Context explores the environment that conditioned Faulkner's creative work and offers readers a framework in which to better understand this challenging writer.

Balancing the Books

Balancing the Books represents a sophisticated examination of the ongoing engagement of American literature with the economies of slavery through the works of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison.

Balancing the Books

Balancing the Books represents a sophisticated examination of the ongoing engagement of American literature with the economies of slavery through the works of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison. Both Faulkner and Morrison write about the relationship between race, identity, and history, and about how the legacies of slavery linger in the lives and actions of their characters, although the narrative strategies through which they render these themes ultimately diverge. Dussere brings considerations of debt and repayment, exchange and accounting, and capital and the market-concepts inseparable from any consideration of race in the construction of the American nation-into dialogue with the work of Faulkner and Morrison to produce an outstanding work of literary and cultural criticism.

Faulkner s Sexualities

In need of an ideology to justify slavery, slaveholders and apologists for slavery alike turned to the ideal of the sentimental family to represent the love that supposedly obtained between masters and slaves.13 A passage from George ...

Faulkner s Sexualities

William Faulkner grew up and began his writing career during a time of great cultural upheaval, especially in the realm of sexuality, where every normative notion of identity and relationship was being re-examined. Not only does Faulkner explore multiple versions of sexuality throughout his work, but he also studies the sexual dimension of various social, economic, and aesthetic concerns. In Faulkner's Sexualities, contributors query Faulkner's life and fiction in terms of sexual identity, sexual politics, and the ways in which such concerns affect his aesthetics. Given the frequent play with sexual norms and practices, how does Faulkner's fiction constitute the sexual subject in relation to the dynamics of the body, language, and culture? In what ways does Faulkner participate in discourses of masculinity and femininity, desire and reproduction, heterosexuality and homosexuality? In what ways are these discourses bound up with representations of race and ethnicity, modernity and ideology, region and nation? In what ways do his texts touch on questions concerning the racialization of categories of gender within colonial and dominant metropolitan discourses and power relations? Is there a Southern sexuality? This volume wrestles with these questions and relates them to theories of race, gender, and sexuality.

William Faulkner at Twentieth Century Fox

much as Faulkner's screenplay—including an instruction to alter radically the characterization of Duncan, and to move the site of the slavelandings from Washington, DC to the coast of Carolina (the “slave smugglers ... are not so stupid ...

William Faulkner at Twentieth Century Fox

William Faulkner at Twentieth Century-Fox: The Annotated Screenplays presents for the first time and in one volume the five screenplays Faulkner wrote while under contract to Twentieth Century-Fox in the mid 1930s and a sixth he wrote in 1952. An informative introduction describes Faulkner's screenwriting practices, such as adaptation and collaboration, and contextualizes these within a broader genealogy of Hollywood screenwriting and within one of the most important moments in the history of American cinema. Each of the six screenplays appears in full with scholarly annotations, and brief prefatory essays elucidate their evolution over various drafts and with various co-writers. The edition makes available for the first time and in one volume Faulkner's Fox screen writings, and, with its scholarly apparatus, thus makes a valuable contribution to recent scholarship across a number of fields: Faulkner and film; literature and film/adaptation studies; cinematic modernism; and screenplay studies. It also foregrounds Faulkner's many significant collaborators, such as Zanuck and Howard Hawks, and therefore makes an important contribution to the history of Twentieth Century-Fox under Zanuck.

Faulkner s Inheritance

abolition of slavery had preceded his arrival there by many years, but there is considerable disagreement among critics about whether the error is Faulkner's or Sutpen's—or, in fact, whether it is an error at all or just an assumption ...

Faulkner s Inheritance

Essays by Susan V. Donaldson, Lael Gold, Adam Gussow, Martin Kreiswirth, Jay Parini, Noel Polk, Judith L. Sensibar, Jon Smith, and Priscilla Wald William Faulkner once said that the writer “collects his material all his life from everything he reads, from everything he listens to, everything he sees, and he stores that away in sort of a filing cabinet . . . in my case it's not anything near as neat as a filing case; it's more like a junk box.” Faulkner tended to be quite casual about his influences. For example, he referred to the South as “not very important to me. I just happen to know it, and don't have time in one life to learn another one and write at the same time.” His Christian background, according to him, was simply another tool he might pick up on one of his visits to “the lumber room” that would help him tell a story. Sometimes he claimed he never read James Joyce's Ulysses or had never heard of Thomas Mann—writers he would elsewhere declare as “the two great men in my time.” Sometimes he expressed annoyance at readers who found esoteric theory in his fiction, when all he wanted them to find was Faulkner: “I have never read [Freud]. Neither did Shakespeare. I doubt if Melville did either, and I'm sure Moby-Dick didn't.” Nevertheless, Faulkner's life was rich in what he did, saw, and read, and he seems to have remembered all of it and put it to use in his fiction. Faulkner's Inheritance is a collection of essays that examines the influences on Faulkner's fiction, including his own family history, Jim Crow laws, contemporary fashion, popular culture, and literature.

William Faulkner and the Faces of Modernity

What we could call Faulkner's slave oeuvre, the body of writing in which the perspective and predicament of enslaved persons command serious authorial attention and respect, is bracketed by two extraordinary accounts of slave death.

William Faulkner and the Faces of Modernity

William Faulkner has enjoyed a secure reputation as American modernism's foremost fiction writer, and as a landmark figure in international literary modernism, for well over half a century. Less secure, however, has been any scholarly consensus about what those modernist credentials actually entail. Over recent decades, there have been lively debates in modernist studies over the who, what, where, when, and how of the surprisingly elusive phenomena of modernism and modernity. This book broadens and deepens an understanding of Faulkner's oeuvre by following some of the guiding questions and insights of new modernism studies scholarship into understudied aspects of Faulkner's literary modernism and his cultural modernity. William Faulkner and the Faces of Modernity explores Faulkner's rural Mississippians as modernizing subjects in their own right rather than mere objects of modernization; traces the new speed gradients, media formations, and intensifications of sensory and affective experience that the twentieth century brought to the cities and countryside of the US South; maps the fault lines in whiteness as a racial modernity under construction and contestation during the Jim Crow period; resituates Faulkner's fictional Yoknapatawpha County within the transnational counter-modernities of the Black Atlantic; and follows the author's imaginative engagement with modern biopolitics through his late work A Fable, a novel Faulkner hoped to make his 'magnum o.' By returning to the utterly uncontroversial fact of Faulkner's modernism with a critical sensibility sharpened by new modernism studies, William Faulkner and the Faces of Modernity aims to spark further reappraisal of a distinguished and quite dazzling body of fiction. Perhaps even make it new.

Slavery in the City

Architecture and Landscapes of Urban Slavery in North America Clifton Ellis, Rebecca Ginsburg. Archaeology of the Built Environment,” Historical Archaeology 38, no. 2 (2004): 55–67. 35. Charles H. Faulkner, “Archaeology at Blount ...

Slavery in the City

Countering the widespread misconception that slavery existed only on plantations, and that urban areas were immune from its impacts, Slavery in the City is the first volume to deal exclusively with the impact of North American slavery on urban design and city life during the antebellum period. This groundbreaking collection of essays brings together studies from diverse disciplines, including architectural history, historical archaeology, geography, and American studies. The contributors analyze urban sites and landscapes that are likewise varied, from the back lots of nineteenth-century Charleston townhouses to movements of enslaved workers through the streets of a small Tennessee town. These essays not only highlight the diversity of the slave experience in the antebellum city and town but also clearly articulate the common experience of conflict inherent in relationships based on power, resistance, and adaptation. Slavery in the City makes significant contributions to our understanding of American slavery and offers an essential guide to any study of slavery and the built environment.

A Reader s Guide to William Faulkner

It is a nightmarish story because Faulkner offers no catharsis. The slave remains unreconciled to his death. Faulkner can offer no catharsis because, as this story and other early works show, the idea of death evoked in him a feeling of ...

A Reader s Guide to William Faulkner

The new guide, the first comprehensive book of its kind, offers analyses of all Faulkner's short stories, published and unpublished, that were not incorporated into novels or turned into chapters of a novel. Seventy-one stories receive individual critical analysis and evaluation. These discussions reveal the relationship of the stories to the novels and point up Faulkner's skills as a writer of short fiction. Although Faulkner often spoke disparagingly of the short story form and claimed that he wrote stories for moneywhich he didEdmond L. Volpe's study reveals that Faulkner could not escape even in this shorter form his incomparable fictional imagination nor his mastery of narrative structure and technique.

Darwin and Faulkner s Novels

God had never intended sexual congress between the races, and even Bachman “sanctioned slavery as a biblically ordained ... For the North, to appropriate Faulkner's Charles Bon in Hughesean mode, “would have made them slaves too, ...

Darwin and Faulkner   s Novels

Displaying a wide range of knowledge and interpretive skill, Darwin and Faulkner's Novels reexamines the fiction of the great twentieth century American author from the interdisciplinary perspective of sociobiology. Challenging the assumption that Faulkner's South was nothing other than a reactionary wilderness and charting the manner in which Faulkner learned and applied his evolutionary concepts, this book unsettles staid interpretations of the Falknerian canon and overturns habitual judgments as to the value of his later novels.

Slavery and the American South

If Virginia was poor and indebted , Faulkner argued , it was not because slavery was unprofitable but because the profits of slavery were siphoned off to the northern merchants who monopolized the commerce in slave - produced goods .

Slavery and the American South

AMERICAN HISTORY -- African American --> In 1900 very few historians were exploring the institution of slavery in the South. But in the next half century, the culture of slavery became a dominating theme in Southern historiography. In the 1970s it was the subject of the first Chancellor's Symposium in Southern History held at the University of Mississippi. Since then, scholarly interest in slavery has proliferated ever more widely. In fact, the editor of this retrospective volume states that since the 1970s "the expansion has resulted in a corpus that has a huge number of components-scores, even hundreds, rather than mere dozens." He states that "no such gathering could possibly summarize all the changes of those twenty-five years." Hence, for the Chancellor Porter L. Fortune Symposium in Southern History in the year 2000, instead of providing historiographical summary, the participants were invited to formulate thoughts arising from their own special interests and experiences. Each paper was complemented by a learned, penetrating reaction. "On balance," the editor avers in his introduction, "reflection about the whole can convey a further sense of the condition of this field of scholarship at the very end of the last century, which was surely an improvement over what prevailed at the beginning." The collection of papers includes the following: "Logic and Experience: Thomas Jefferson's Life in the Law" by Annette Gordon-Reed, with commentary by Peter S. Onuf; "The Peculiar Fate of the Bourgeois Critique of Slavery" by James Oakes, with commentary by Walter Johnson; "Reflections on Law, Culture, and Slavery" by Ariela Gross, with commentary by Laura F. Edwards; "Rape in Black and White: Sexual Violence in the Testimony of Enslaved and Free Americans" by Norrece T. Jones, Jr., with commentary by Jan Lewis; "The Long History of a Low Place: Slavery on the South Carolina Coast, 1670-1870" by Robert Olwell, with commentary by William Dusinberre; "Paul Robeson and Richard Wright on the Arts and Slave Culture" by Sterling Stuckey, with commentary by Roger D. Abrahams. Winthrop D. Jordan is William F. Winter Professor of History and professor of African American studies at the University of Mississippi. His previous books include White Over Black: American Attitudes toward the Negro, 1550-1812 and The White Man's Burden: Historical Origins of Racism in the United States, and his work has been published in the Atlantic Monthly, Daedalus, and the Journal of Southern History, among other periodicals.