Female Patients in Early Modern Britain

... of early modern British medicine. The significance of this determination is that early modern medical practice was fundamentally sexed in its treatment of all diseases, including those which afflicted both male and female patients.

Female Patients in Early Modern Britain

This investigation contributes to the existing scholarship on women and medicine in early modern Britain by examining the diagnosis and treatment of female patients by male professional medical practitioners from 1590 to 1740. In order to obtain a clearer understanding of female illness and medicine during this period, this study examines ailments that were specific and unique to female patients as well as illnesses and conditions that afflicted both female and male patients. Through a qualitative and quantitative analysis of practitioners' records and patients' writings - such as casebooks, diaries and letters - an emphasis is placed on medical practice. Despite the prevalence of females amongst many physicians' casebooks and the existence of sex-based differences in the consultations, diagnoses and treatments of patients, there is no evidence to indicate that either the health or the medical care of females was distinctly disadvantaged by the actions of male practitioners. Instead, the diagnoses and treatments of women were premised on a much deeper and more nuanced understanding of the female body than has previously been implied within the historiography. In turn, their awareness and appreciation of the unique features of female anatomy and physiology meant that male practitioners were sympathetic and accommodating to the needs of individual female patients during this pivotal period in British medicine.

Female Transgression in Early Modern Britain

Presenting a broad spectrum of reflections on the subject of female transgression in early modern Britain, this volume proposes a richly productive dialogue between literary and historical approaches to the topic.

Female Transgression in Early Modern Britain

Presenting a broad spectrum of reflections on the subject of female transgression in early modern Britain, this volume proposes a richly productive dialogue between literary and historical approaches to the topic. The essays presented here cover a range of ’transgressive’ women: daughters, witches, prostitutes, thieves; mothers/wives/murderers; violence in NW England; violence in Scotland; single mothers; women as (sexual) partners in crime. Contributions illustrate the dynamic relation between fiction and fact that informs literary and socio-historical analysis alike, exploring female transgression as a process, not of crossing fixed boundaries, but of negotiating the epistemological space between representation and documentation.

Aphrodisiacs Fertility and Medicine in Early Modern England

Thomas Laqueur has argued that the dominant early modern medical paradigm for explaining the sexed body, the 'one-sex' model, ... For further critiques of Laqueur see Wendy Churchill, Female patients in early modern Britain: gender, ...

Aphrodisiacs  Fertility and Medicine in Early Modern England

This book argues that aphrodisiacs were used not simply for sexual pleasure, but, more importantly, to enhance fertility and reproductive success; and that at that time sexual desire and pleasure were felt to be far more intimately connected to conception and fertility than is the case today.

Women Writers and the Early Modern British Political Tradition

This collection of essays includes studies of women's political writings from Christine de Pizan to Mary Wollstonecraft and explores in depth the political ideas of the writers in their historical and intellectual context.

Women Writers and the Early Modern British Political Tradition

Essays on women's political writings from Christine de Pizan to Mary Wollstonecraft, 1500-1800.

Culture and Change

Revell explores the ways in which technical values - a distinctive civic culture of expertise - helped to reshape ideas of community, generate new centers of public authority, and change the physical landscape of New York City."--Jacket.

Culture and Change

These issues of city-building and institutional change involved more than the familiar push and pull of interest groups or battles between bosses, reformers, immigrants, and natives. Revell explores the ways in which technical values - a distinctive civic culture of expertise - helped to reshape ideas of community, generate new centers of public authority, and change the physical landscape of New York City."--Jacket.

Women in Early Modern England 1550 1720

What was life like for ordinary women who lived in Tudor and Stuart England? This fascinating book provides a frank account of the daily experiences of these women, using first-hand sources such as letters, diaries, and household accounts.

Women in Early Modern England  1550 1720

What was life like for ordinary women who lived in Tudor and Stuart England? This fascinating book provides a frank account of the daily experiences of these women, using first-hand sources such as letters, diaries, and household accounts.

Women and Property

This ground-breaking book reveals the economic reality of ordinary women between the late 16th and early 18th centuries.

Women and Property

This ground-breaking book reveals the economic reality of ordinary women between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. Drawing on little-known sources, Amy Louise Erickson reconstructs day-to-day lives, showing how women owned, managed and inherited property on a scale previously unrecognised. Her complex and fascinating research, which contrasts the written laws with the actual practice, completely revises the traditional picture of women's economic status in pre-industrial England. Women and Property is essential reading for anyone interested in women, law and the past.

Ritual and Conflict The Social Relations of Childbirth in Early Modern England

... University Titles in the series include The One-Sex Body on Trial: The Classical and Early Modern Evidence Helen King Medical Consulting by Letter in France, 1665–1789 Robert Weston Female Patients in Early Modern Britain Gender, ...

Ritual and Conflict  The Social Relations of Childbirth in Early Modern England

This book places childbirth in early-modern England within a wider network of social institutions and relationships. Starting with illegitimacy - the violation of the marital norm - it proceeds through marriage to the wider gender-order and so to the ’ceremony of childbirth’, the popular ritual through which women collectively controlled this, the pivotal event in their lives. Focussing on the seventeenth century, but ranging from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century, this study offers a new viewpoint on such themes as the patriarchal family, the significance of illegitimacy, and the structuring of gender-relations in the period.

Women and Epistolary Agency in Early Modern Culture 1450 1690

In this volume, the study of women’s letters is not confined to writings by women; contributors here examine not only the collaborative nature of some letter-writing but also explore how men addressed women in their correspondence as well ...

Women and Epistolary Agency in Early Modern Culture  1450   1690

Women and Epistolary Agency in Early Modern Culture, 1450–1690 is the first collection to examine the gendered nature of women’s letter-writing in England and Ireland from the late-fifteenth century through to the Restoration. The essays collected here represent an important body of new work by a group of international scholars who together look to reorient the study of women’s letters in the contexts of early modern culture. The volume builds upon recent approaches to the letter, both rhetorical and material, that have the power to transform the ways in which we understand, study and situate early modern women’s letter-writing, challenging misconceptions of women’s letters as intrinsically private, domestic and apolitical. The essays in the volume embrace a range of interdisciplinary approaches: historical, literary, palaeographic, linguistic, material and gender-based. Contributors deal with a variety of issues related to early modern women’s correspondence in England and Ireland. These include women’s rhetorical and persuasive skills and the importance of gendered epistolary strategies; gender and the materiality of the letter as a physical form; female agency, education, knowledge and power; epistolary networks and communication technologies. In this volume, the study of women’s letters is not confined to writings by women; contributors here examine not only the collaborative nature of some letter-writing but also explore how men addressed women in their correspondence as well as some rich examples of how women were constructed in and through the letters of men. As a whole, the book stands as a valuable reassessment of the complex gendered nature of early modern women’s correspondence.

Gender and Early Modern Constructions of Childhood

Drawing on art history, literary studies and social history, the essays in this volume explore a range of intersections between gender and constructions of childhood in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries in Italy, England, France and Spain.

Gender and Early Modern Constructions of Childhood

Drawing on art history, literary studies and social history, the essays in this volume explore a range of intersections between gender and constructions of childhood in the 15th, 16th and 17th centuries in Italy, England, France and Spain. Contributors examine representations of children and childhood in a range of sources from the period, from paintings and poetry to legal records and personal correspondence.

Female Transgression in Early Modern Britain

chapter 4 Fact versus Fiction: The construction of the Figure of the Prostitute in Early Modern England, Official and Popular discourses Frédérique Fouassier-Tate If you were able to step back in time and have a stroll through the ...

Female Transgression in Early Modern Britain

Containing wide-ranging reflections on the subject of female transgression in early modern Britain, this volume presents a richly productive dialogue between literary and historical approaches to the topic. The contributors illustrate the dynamic relation between fiction and fact that informs literary and socio-historical analysis alike, exploring female transgression as a process, not of crossing fixed boundaries, but of negotiating the epistemological space between representation and documentation.

Genre and Women s Life Writing in Early Modern England

Examining how early modern women made use of formal and generic structures to constitute themselves in writing, the essays collected here interrogate the discursive contours of gendered identity in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England ...

Genre and Women s Life Writing in Early Modern England

Examining how early modern women made use of formal and generic structures to constitute themselves in writing, the essays collected here interrogate the discursive contours of gendered identity in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. Collectively the contributors situate women's life writings within the broader textual culture of early modern England while maintaining a focus on the particular rhetorical devices and narrative structures that comprise individual texts.

Rhetoric Medicine and the Woman Writer 1600 1700

Churchill, Wendy D. Female Patients in Early Modern Britain: Gender, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Farnham, UK, and Burlington, VT; Ashgate, 2013. Clarke, Elizabeth. “Ejaculation or Virgin Birth?: The Gendering of the Religious Lyric in the ...

Rhetoric  Medicine  and the Woman Writer  1600 1700

A subtle yet wide-ranging study confirming the importance of rhetoric in physicians' rise to medical dominance and prestige.

The Politics of Female Alliance in Early Modern England

Lorna Hutson, The Usurer's Daughter: Male Friendship and Fictions of Women in SixteenthCentury England (London: Routledge, 1994), 3. Penelope Anderson, “The Absent Female Friend: Recent Studies in Early Modern Women's Friendship,” ...

The Politics of Female Alliance in Early Modern England

Introduction -- The politics of women's "domestic" alliances. Distaff power: plebeian female alliances in early modern England / Bernard Capp -- Between women: slanderous speech and neighborly bonds in Henry Porter's The two angry women of Abington / Ronda Arab -- The political role of the gossip in Swetnam the woman-hater, arraigned by women / Megan Inbody -- Virtual and actual female alliance in The maid's tragedy and The tamer tamed / Niamh J. O'Leary -- Failed alliances and miserable marriages in Katherine Philips's letters / Elizabeth Hodgson -- Women's alliances and the politics of the court. Performing patronage, crafting alliances: ladies' lotteries in English pageantry / Elizabeth Zeman Kolkovich -- Tyrants, love, and ladies' eyes: the politics of female-boy alliance on the Jacobean stage Roberta Barker -- Her advocate to the loudest: Arbella Stuart and female courtly alliance in The winter's tale / Alicia Tomasian -- Not sparing kings: Aemilia Lanyer and the religious politics of female alliance / Christina Luckyj -- The politics of female kinship. Shakespeare revises Juliet, the nurse, and Lady Capulet in Romeo and Juliet / Steven Urkowitz -- Crossing generations: female alliances and dynastic power in Anne Clifford's great books of record / Jessica l. Malay -- Exilic inspiration and the captive life: the literary/political alliances of the Cavendish sisters / Jennifer Higginbotham -- Afterword / Susan Frye and Karen Robertson

Women in Early Modern Britain 1450 1640

Christine Peters Women in Early Modern Britain, 1450–1640 Richard Rex The Lollards George Robb British Culture and the First World War R. Malcolm Smuts Culture and Power in England, 1585–1685 John Spurr English Puritanism, ...

Women in Early Modern Britain  1450 1640

Although in its infancy, the history of women in Wales and Scotland before and during the Reformation is now thriving. A longer tradition of historical studies has shed light on many areas of women's experience in England. Drawing on this historiography, Christine Peters examines the significance of contrasting social, economic and religious conditions in shaping the lives of women in Britain. Gender assumptions were broadly similar in England, Wales and Scotland, but female experience varied widely. Women in Early Modern Britain, 1450-1640 explores how this was influenced by various factors, including changes in clanship and inheritance, the employment of single women, the punishment of pregnant brides and scolds, the introduction of Protestantism, and the fusion of fairy beliefs with ideas of demonological witchcraft. Peters' text is the first comparative survey and analysis of the diversity of women's lives in Britain during the early modern period.

Cultures of Correspondence in Early Modern Britain

“Literary Memorialization and the Posthumous Construction of Female Authorship.” In The Arts of Remembrance in Early Modern England: Memorial Cultures of the Post Reformation, ed. Andrew Gordon and Thomas Rist. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2013 ...

Cultures of Correspondence in Early Modern Britain

The letter is a powerfully evocative form that has gained in resonance as the habits of personal letter writing have declined in a digital age. But faith in the letter as evidence of the intimate thoughts of individuals underplays the sophisticated ways letters functioned in the past. In Cultures of Correspondence in Early Modern Britain leading scholars approach the letter from a variety of disciplinary perspectives to uncover the habits, forms, and secrets of letter writing. Where material features of the letter have often been ignored by past generations fixated on the text alone, contributors to this volume examine how such elements as handwriting, seals, ink, and the arrangement of words on the manuscript page were significant carriers of meaning alongside epistolary rhetorics. The chapters here also explore the travels of the letter, uncovering the many means through which correspondence reached a reader and the ways in which the delivery of letters preoccupied contemporaries. At the same time, they reveal how other practices, such as the use of cipher and the designs of forgery, threatened to subvert the surveillance and reading of letters. The anxiety of early modern letter writers over the vulnerability of correspondence is testament to the deep dependence of the culture on the letter. Beyond the letter as a material object, Cultures of Correspondence sheds light on textual habits. Individual chapters study the language of letter writers to reveal that what appears to be a personal and unvarnished expression of the writer's thought is in fact a deliberate, skillful exercise in managing the conventions and expectations of the form. If letters were a prominent and ingrained part of the cultural life of the early modern period, they also enjoyed textual and archival afterlives whose stories are rarely told. Too often studied only in the case of figures already celebrated for their historical or literary significance, the letter in Cultures of Correspondence emerges as the most vital and wide-ranging material, textual form of the early modern period. Contributors: Nadine Akkerman, Mark Brayshay, Christopher Burlinson, James Daybell, Jonathan Gibson, Andrew Gordon, Arnold Hunt, Lynne Magnusson, Michelle O'Callaghan, Alan Stewart, Andrew Zurcher.

Envisioning the Worst

"Tracing all the pre-colonial representations of "Hottentots" and "Hottentotism" operative in early-modern England allows us to see the birth and the development of a prejudice that became central to the nation.

Envisioning the Worst

"Tracing all the pre-colonial representations of "Hottentots" and "Hottentotism" operative in early-modern England allows us to see the birth and the development of a prejudice that became central to the nation. In their constructions of "Hottentots" the English found a way to vent their own fear, anger, and conflict about themselves and their society, particularly as they were transforming and redefining their nation as imperial Great Britain. The very invention of the "Hottentots" shows that the English needed to envision a worst people in order to imagine themselves as the world's most advanced people."--BOOK JACKET.

Privacy Domesticity and Women in Early Modern England

The ten essays in this collection explore the discrete yet overlapping female spaces of privacy and domesticity in early modern England.

Privacy  Domesticity  and Women in Early Modern England

The ten essays in this collection explore the discrete yet overlapping female spaces of privacy and domesticity in early modern England. While other literary critics have focused their studies of female privacy on widows, witches, female recusants and criminals, the contributors to this collection propose that the early modern subculture of femaleness is more expansive and formative than is typically understood. They maintain that the subculture includes segregated, sometimes secluded, domestic places for primarily female activities like nursing, sewing, cooking, and caring for children and the sick. It also includes hidden psychological realms of privacy, organized by women's personal habits, around intimate friendships or kinship, and behind institutional powerlessness. The texts discussed in the volume include plays not only by Shakespeare but also Ford, Wroth, Marvell, Spenser and Cavendish, among others. Through the lens of literature, contributors consider the unstructured, fluid quality of much everyday female experience as well as the dimensions, symbols, and the ever-changing politics and culture of the household. They analyze the complex habits of female settings-the verbal, spatial, and affective strategies of early-modern women's culture, including private rituals, domestic practices, and erotic attachments-in order to provide a broader picture of female culture and of female authority. The authors argue-through a range of critical approaches that include feminist, historical, and psychoanalytic-that early modern women often transformed their confinement into something useful and necessary, creating protected and even sacred spaces with their own symbols and aesthetic.

Debating Gender in Early Modern England 1500 1700

This book explores the construction of gender ideology in early modern England through an analysis of the querelle des femmes - the debate about the relationship between the sexes that originated on the continent during the middle ages and ...

Debating Gender in Early Modern England  1500   1700

This book explores the construction of gender ideology in early modern England through an analysis of the querelle des femmes - the debate about the relationship between the sexes that originated on the continent during the middle ages and the Renaissance and developed in England into the Swetnam controversy, which revolved around the publication of Joseph Swetnam's The arraignment of lewd, forward, and inconstant women and the pamphlets which responded to its misogynist attacks. The volume contextualizes the debate in terms of its continental antecedents and elite manuscript circulation in England, then moves to consider popular culture and printed texts from the Jacobean debate and its effects on women's writing and the developing discourse on gender, and concludes with an examination of the ramifications of the debate during the Civil War and Restoration. Essays focus attention on the implications of the gender debate for women writers and their literary relations, cultural ideology and the family, and political discourse and ideas of nationhood.

The Maritime World of Early Modern Britain

Elizabeth Hill repaired hundreds of compasses for the navy in 1643 and 1644, and Elizabeth Meader received eighteen shillings for mending compasses for the Recovery and Portsmouth frigates.56 During the war, women came to dominate some ...

The Maritime World of Early Modern Britain

Britain's emergence as one of Europe's major maritime powers has all too frequently been subsumed by nationalistic narratives that focus on operations and technology. This volume, by contrast, offers a daring new take on Britain's maritime past. It brings together scholars from a range of disciplines to explore the manifold ways in which the sea shaped British history, demonstrating the number of approaches that now have a stake in defining the discipline of maritime history. The chapters analyse the economic, social, and cultural contexts in which English maritime endeavour existed, as well as discussing representations of the sea. The contributors show how people from across the British Isles increasingly engaged with the maritime world, whether through their own lived experiences or through material culture. The volume also includes essays that investigate encounters between English voyagers and indigenous peoples in Africa, and the intellectual foundations of imperial ambition.