Feud in the Icelandic Saga

Byock sees the crucial element in the origin of the Icelandic sagas not as the introduction of writing or the impact of literary borrowings from the continent but the subject of the tales themselves - feud.

Feud in the Icelandic Saga

Byock sees the crucial element in the origin of the Icelandic sagas not as the introduction of writing or the impact of literary borrowings from the continent but the subject of the tales themselves - feud. This simple thesis is developed into a thorough examination of Icelandic society and feud, and of the narrative technique of recounting it.

Feud in the Icelandic Saga

to one another the stories of their feuds before they learned how to write . The sagamen who composed the Icelandic family sagas used a reliable but unarticulated narrative strategy to develop tales of feud . They combined three core ...

Feud in the Icelandic Saga

Byock sees the crucial element in the origin of the Icelandic sagas not as the introduction of writing or the impact of literary borrowings from the continent but the subject of the tales themselves - feud. This simple thesis is developed into a thorough examination of Icelandic society and feud, and of the narrative technique of recounting it.

Medieval Iceland

Gift of Joan Wall. Includes index. Includes bibliographical references (p. 227-248) and index. * glr 20090610.

Medieval Iceland

Gift of Joan Wall. Includes index. Includes bibliographical references (p. 227-248) and index. * glr 20090610.

Viking Age Iceland

'Viking Age Iceland' is an engaging, multi-disciplinary work bringing together findings in anthropology and ethnography interwoven with historical fact and masterful insights into the popular Icelandic sagas, this is a brilliant ...

Viking Age Iceland

Medieval Iceland was unique amongst Western Europe, with no foreign policy, no defence forces, no king, no lords, no peasants and few battles. It should have been a utopia yet its literature is dominated by brutality and killing. The reasons for this, argues Jesse Byock, lie in the underlying structures and cultural codes of the islands' social order. 'Viking Age Iceland' is an engaging, multi-disciplinary work bringing together findings in anthropology and ethnography interwoven with historical fact and masterful insights into the popular Icelandic sagas, this is a brilliant reconstruction of the inner workings of a unique and intriguing society.

The Routledge Research Companion to the Medieval Icelandic Sagas

24 Jesse L. Byock, Feud in the Icelandic Saga, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1982. 25 Byock, Feud in the Icelandic Saga, 143–60. 26 Jesse L. Byock, Medieval Iceland: Society, Sagas and Power.

The Routledge Research Companion to the Medieval Icelandic Sagas

The last fifty years have seen a significant change in the focus of saga studies, from a preoccupation with origins and development to a renewed interest in other topics, such as the nature of the sagas and their value as sources to medieval ideologies and mentalities. The Routledge Research Companion to the Medieval Icelandic Sagas presents a detailed interdisciplinary examination of saga scholarship over the last fifty years, sometimes juxtaposing it with earlier views and examining the sagas both as works of art and as source materials. This volume will be of interest to Old Norse and medieval Scandinavian scholars and accessible to medievalists in general.

The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas

239-315 ; Jesse L. Byock , Medieval Iceland : Society ; Sagas , and Power and Feud in the Icelandic Saga ( Berkeley : University of California Press , 1988 ) ; the introductions to the saga translations in the Penguin Classics series ...

The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas

The world's longest lasting republic between ancient Rome and modern Switzerland, medieval Iceland (c. 870-1262) centered its national literature, the great family sagas, around the problem of can a republic survive and do justice to its inhabitants. The Conflict of Law and Justice in the Icelandic Sagas takes a semiotic approach to six of the major sagas which depict a nation of free men, abetted by formidable women, testing conflicting legal codes and principles - pagan v. Christian, vengeance v. compromise, monarchy v. republicanism, courts v. arbitration. The sagas emerge as a body of great literature embodying profound reflections on political and legal philosophy because they do not offer simple solutions, but demonstrate the tragic choices facing legal thinkers (Njal), warriors (Gunnar), outlaws (Grettir), women (Gudrun of Laxdaela Saga), priests (Snorri of Eyrbyggja Saga), and the Icelandic community in its quest for stability and a good society. Guest forewords by Robert Ginsberg and Roberta Kevelson, set the book in the contexts of philosophy, semiotics, and Icelandic studies to which it contributes.

The Cambridge Introduction to the Old Norse Icelandic Saga

Perceiving some of the structural inflexibilities of the Anderssonian six-point schema, Byock proposed in his Feud in the Icelandic Saga (1982) that saga literature imitates life, that is, social life in Iceland in the Saga Age, ...

The Cambridge Introduction to the Old Norse Icelandic Saga

The medieval Norse-Icelandic saga is one of the most important European vernacular literary genres of the Middle Ages. This Introduction to the saga genre outlines its origins and development, its literary character, its material existence in manuscripts and printed editions, and its changing reception from the Middle Ages to the present time. Its multiple sub-genres - including family sagas, mythical-heroic sagas and sagas of knights - are described and discussed in detail, and the world of medieval Icelanders is powerfully evoked. The first general study of the Old Norse-Icelandic saga to be written in English for some decades, the Introduction is based on up-to-date scholarship and engages with current debates in the field. With suggestions for further reading, detailed information about the Icelandic literary canon, and a map of medieval Iceland, this book is aimed at students of medieval literature and assumes no prior knowledge of Scandinavian languages.

Bloodtaking and Peacemaking

This book offers fascinating insights into the politics of a stateless society, its methods of social control, and the role that a uniquely sophisticated and self-conscious law played in the construction of Icelandic society.

Bloodtaking and Peacemaking

Dubbed by the New York Times as "one of the most sought-after legal academics in the county," William Ian Miller presents the arcane worlds of the Old Norse studies in a way sure to attract the interest of a wide range of readers. Bloodtaking and Peacemaking delves beneath the chaos and brutality of the Norse world to discover a complex interplay of ordering and disordering impulses. Miller's unique and engaging readings of ancient Iceland's sagas and extensive legal code reconstruct and illuminate the society that produced them. People in the saga world negotiated a maze of violent possibility, with strategies that frequently put life and limb in the balance. But there was a paradox in striking the balance—one could not get even without going one better. Miller shows how blood vengeance, law, and peacemaking were inextricably bound together in the feuding process. This book offers fascinating insights into the politics of a stateless society, its methods of social control, and the role that a uniquely sophisticated and self-conscious law played in the construction of Icelandic society. "Illuminating."—Rory McTurk, Times Literary Supplement "An impressive achievement in ethnohistory; it is an amalgam of historical research with legal and anthropological interpretation. What is more, and rarer, is that it is a pleasure to read due to the inclusion of narrative case material from the sagas themselves."—Dan Bauer, Journal of Interdisciplinary History

The Saga of the Volsungs

A trove of traditional lore, this Icelandic prose epic tells of love, jealousy, vengeance, war, and the mythic deeds of the dragonslayer, Sigurd the Volsung.

The Saga of the Volsungs

A trove of traditional lore, this Icelandic prose epic tells of love, jealousy, vengeance, war, and the mythic deeds of the dragonslayer, Sigurd the Volsung. The saga is of special interest to admirers of Richard Wagner, who drew heavily upon this Norse source in writing his Ring Cycle. With its magical ring acquired by the hero, and the sword to be reforged, the saga has also been a primary source for writers of fantasy such as J.R.R. Tolkien and romantics such as William Morris. Byock's comprehensive introduction explores the history, legends, and myths contained in the saga and traces the development of a narrative that reaches back to the period of the great folk migrations in Europe when the Roman Empire collapsed.

Viking Language 2

This book takes the reader deep into the world of the Vikings. juleswilliampress.com and oldnorse.org

Viking Language 2

Viking Language 2: The Old Norse Reader (Book 2 in The Viking Language Series) is a treasure trove of Scandinavian lore, immersing the learner in Old Norse sources and runes. The book offers a large Vocabulary, chapters on eddic and skaldic poetry, and a reference grammar. The learner reads complete sagas, myths, creation stories, legends, runic inscriptions, and poems about Scan-dinavian gods, monster-slayers, dwarves, giants, and warrior kings, and queens. This book takes the reader deep into the world of the Vikings. juleswilliampress.com and oldnorse.org

Old Norse Old Icelandic

" Carefully designed, this book requires no previous knowledge and is a quick and exciting way for modern self-learners and classes to read Old Scandinavian sources about the Viking Age.

Old Norse   Old Icelandic

This new introduction to the Old Norse Language of the sagas answers the need for an easy-to-use "primer." Carefully designed, this book requires no previous knowledge and is a quick and exciting way for modern self-learners and classes to read Old Scandinavian sources about the Viking Age. The concise lessons supply all necessary grammar, exercises, and vocabulary. The beginner quickly starts reading original passages from sagas and The Prose Edda (a primary mythological source). Here is an excellent way to begin mastering Old Norse. For more, visit juleswilliampress.com and oldnorse.org

Dealing With The Dead

The Islendingasögur, [Icelandic sagas] come from the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries and describe the ... Many scholars have remarked on the preponderance of violence in this culture, where the code of the blood-feud led to ...

Dealing With The Dead

From revenant legends to the regulation of burial space; from martyrologies to accounts of murder; and from the danse macabre to funerals both lavish and simple, this volume examines how communities dealt with their dead as continual, albeit non-living members.

Excommunication and Outlawry in the Legal World of Medieval Iceland

... the earliest surviving legal code for Iceland, often bolstered with material from the so- called outlaw sagas and other sagas ... 1990); Jesse L Byock, Feud in the Icelandic Saga (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California ...

Excommunication and Outlawry in the Legal World of Medieval Iceland

This book focuses on excommunication, outlawry, and the connections between them in medieval Icelandic legal and literary sources. It argues that outlawry was a punishment shaped by the conventions and structures of excommunication as it developed in canon law.

Landscape Tradition and Power in Medieval Iceland

Bidrag til en litterær antropologi, Aarhus. Bryson, R.A. 1974. 'A Perspective on Climatic Change.' Science 184: 753–62. Byock, J.L. 1982. Feud in the Icelandic Saga, Berkeley. Byock, J.L. 1984a. 'Dispute Resolution in the Sagas.

Landscape  Tradition and Power in Medieval Iceland

In this volume Chris Callow provides a critical reading of the evidence for changes in Iceland’s socio-political structures from its colonisation to the 1260s when leading Icelanders swore oaths of loyalty to the Norwegian king.

The Growth of the Medieval Icelandic Sagas 1180 1280

Andersson introduces readers to the development of the Icelandic sagas between 1180 and 1280, a crucial period that witnessed a gradual shift of emphasis from tales of adventure and personal distinction to the analysis of politics and ...

The Growth of the Medieval Icelandic Sagas  1180 1280

Andersson introduces readers to the development of the Icelandic sagas between 1180 and 1280, a crucial period that witnessed a gradual shift of emphasis from tales of adventure and personal distinction to the analysis of politics and history.

Playing With Fire An Exploration of Loki Laufeyjarson Epub

In the sagas of Iceland the feud was used to channel violence and regulate conflict. ... As Jesse Byock states in his book Feud in the Icelandic Saga: Unlike epic heroes, the Icelandic hero looks primarily to his own self interest.

Playing With Fire  An Exploration of Loki Laufeyjarson  Epub

Everyone knows the Norse god Loki, or at least they think they do: He is the god of mischief, the trickster, the troublemaker of Asgard. To some, he is a destructive force to be defeated or restrained. To others, he is an amusing prankster, a friend, and an ally. Love him or hate him, he’s impossible to ignore. But is there more to Loki, or have we only scratched the surface? Playing With Fire is part historical exploration, part heartfelt devotional, written from the perspective of a devotee who has walked with this often misunderstood deity for over two decades. Go deeper with Loki and be surprised. Go all the way, and be transformed.

A Companion to Old Norse Icelandic Literature and Culture

Editions and Translations The Complete Sagas of Icelanders, including 49 tales (1997). ... In Law and Literature in Medieval Iceland: Ljo'svetninga saga and VallaLjo'ts saga. ... Byock, Jesse L. (1982) Feud in the Icelandic Saga.

A Companion to Old Norse Icelandic Literature and Culture

This major survey of Old Norse-Icelandic literature and culturedemonstrates the remarkable continuity of Icelandic language andculture from medieval to modern times. Comprises 29 chapters written by leading scholars in thefield Reflects current debates among Old Norse-Icelandicscholars Pays attention to previously neglected areas of study, such asthe sagas of Icelandic bishops and the fantasy sagas Looks at the ways Old Norse-Icelandic literature is used bymodern writers, artists and film directors, both within and outsideScandinavia Sets Old Norse-Icelandic language and literature in its widercultural context

THE LAXDAELA SAGA

The story is carried forward by the mysterious workings of fate, symbolized by the prophetic dreams of Gudrun.

THE LAXDAELA SAGA

The Laxdaela saga is an Icelandic Viking saga (story) of the men and women of the Salmon River valley involving the clan of Laxardalur. An amalgam of historical fact, myth, epic, romance, anachronism, and literary invention, the Laxdaela Saga is, in essence, a dramatization of the circumstances surrounding a Norse blood-feud between two sides of a great dynasty; in its second and decisive portion, it treats a love triangle that re-ignites the feud and its adjoining intrigues. Guorun Osvifursdottir, who is famous for her beauty is our protagonist. Courted by the two foster-brothers Kjartan Olafsson and Bolli orleiksson. Guorun preferred Kjartan, but she gave herself to Bolli, because of a false rumour that Kjartan was engaged to Ingibjorg, the sister of King Olafur Tryggvason. The two foster-brothers engaged in hostilities which ended with Bolli killing Kjartan, and Bolli being killed by Kjartan's kinsmen. The story is carried forward by the mysterious workings of fate, symbolized by the prophetic dreams of Gudrun. Noted for its detached narrative style and ornately-patterned structure, the Laxdaela Saga remains a highly influential work of Scandinavian literature and is considered an outstanding example of medieval prose romance. It is considered to be one of the most important Icelandic sagas, originally written in Old Icelandic; probably sometime around the year 1245 AD. It is noted for its mention of the first known Norseman in the Varangian Guard: the Icelander Bolli Bollason.

The Children of Ash and Elm

Viking Archaeology in Iceland (Brepols, Turnhout, 2014), along with regular archaeological reports published by the ... On Icelandic legal structures and the nature of feud, see Jesse Byock, Feud in the Icelandic Saga (University of ...

The Children of Ash and Elm

A TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR 2020 'As brilliant a history of the Vikings as one could possibly hope to read' Tom Holland The 'Viking Age' is traditionally held to begin in June 793 when Scandinavian raiders attacked the monastery of Lindisfarne in Northumbria, and to end in September 1066, when King Harald Hardrada of Norway died leading the charge against the English line at the Battle of Stamford Bridge. This book, the most wide-ranging and comprehensive assessment of the current state of our knowledge, takes a refreshingly different view. It shows that the Viking expansion began generations before the Lindisfarne raid, and traces Scandinavian history back centuries further to see how these people came to be who they were. The narrative ranges across the whole of the Viking diaspora, from Vinland on the eastern American seaboard to Constantinople and Uzbekistan, with contacts as far away as China. Based on the latest archaeology, it explores the complex origins of the Viking phenomenon and traces the seismic shifts in Scandinavian society that resulted from an economy geared to maritime war. Some of its most striking discoveries include the central role of slavery in Viking life and trade, and the previously unsuspected pirate communities and family migrations that were part of the Viking 'armies' - not least in England. Especially, Neil Price takes us inside the Norse mind and spirit-world, and across their borders of identity and gender, to reveal startlingly different Vikings to the barbarian marauders of stereotype. He cuts through centuries of received wisdom to try to see the Vikings as they saw themselves - descendants of the first human couple, the Children of Ash and Elm. Healso reminds us of the simultaneous familiarity and strangeness of the past, of how much we cannot know, alongside the discoveries that change the landscape of our understanding. This is an eye-opening and surprisingly moving book.

Beowulf Other Stories

Further reading Auden , W.H. and Louis MacNiece , Letters from Iceland ( London , 1937 ) . Byock , Jesse L. , Feud in the Icelandic Saga ( Berkeley , CA , 1982 ) . Byock , Jesse L. , Viking Age Iceland ( Harmondsworth , 2001 ) .

Beowulf   Other Stories

Written with verve, panache and a deep understanding of its subject, 'Beowulf' & Other Stories puts the pleasure back into studying Old English. ? A new action film, Beowulf and Grendel, is out very soon and so is an animated version of the tale starring angelina Jolie and Ray Winston ? There is lots of general interest in stories inspired by old English ? tolkein?s Lord of the Rings, Lewis?s Chronicles of Narnia ? The authors have a fantastic writing style ? engaging, witty, insightful ? this book will be a page-turner that focuses on what readers want to know, instead of what it is perceived they ought to know ? Gives the real low-down on the subject ? translates lots of the original text, allows readers to have a go at translation themselves, and gives readers the chance to learn some old English and some old Icelandic ? Contains colour photographs ? rare in this kind of book ? that will visually help to bring old English back to life