Films on Offer

Films on Offer


Films on Offer

Films on Offer


The Cinema and Its Shadow

Race and Technology in Early Cinema Alice Maurice. displays, and bodies framed as “exotic” or alien—the pressure to move for the stationary camera is clear, as is the need to offer something extra, not just motion but interesting motion ...

The Cinema and Its Shadow

The Cinema and Its Shadow argues that race has defined the cinematic apparatus since the earliest motion pictures, especially at times of technological transition. In particular, this work explores how racial difference became central to the resolving of cinematic problems: the stationary camera, narrative form, realism, the synchronization of image and sound, and, perhaps most fundamentally, the immaterial image—the cinema’s “shadow,” which figures both the material reality of the screen image and its racist past. Discussing early “race subjects,” Alice Maurice demonstrates that these films influenced cinematic narrative in lasting ways by helping to determine the relation between stillness and motion, spectacle and narrative drive. The book examines how motion picture technology related to race, embodiment, and authenticity at specific junctures in cinema’s development, including the advent of narratives, feature films, and sound. In close readings of such films as The Cheat, Shadows, and Hallelujah!, Maurice reveals how the rhetoric of race repeatedly embodies film technology, endowing it with a powerful mix of authenticity and magic. In this way, the racialized subject became the perfect medium for showing off, shoring up, and reintroducing the cinematic apparatus at various points in the history of American film. Moving beyond analyzing race in purely thematic or ideological terms, Maurice traces how it shaped the formal and technological means of the cinema.

Voices in the Media

cinema: What. voices. in. what. films? In 2005, Gaertner stated bluntly that quite often 'the Arabic character is the ... the films that offer a new visibility as well as new representations of North African secondgeneration immigrants.

Voices in the Media

Verbal performances are often encountered in the media where they are used to embody characters or social archetypes. Performed voices define the norm as well as the linguistic Others and by doing so circulate associated values and linguistic ideologies. This book explores the idea that, far from simply being exercises in verbal skill and flair, performances of social, ethnic or gendered voices in the media not only have the power to accomplish ideological work, they are also sites of linguistic tension and negotiation. Critically examining performances of French voices in the media, this book raises the following questions: - How are repertoires of voices constructed and subsequently perpetuated in the media? - How do the stereotypic personae these voices contribute to build become familiar to national as well as transnational audiences? - How do such performed voices reproduce hegemonic ideologies of standard and non-standard languages and participate in the perpetuation of social discriminations? - How are these performed voices commodified into cultural products of otherness that may later be reclaimed by stigmatized communities? Following an innovative framework which allows for analysis of performances of varied voices and their impact in the media sphere, Voices in the Media offers a new approach to the linguistics of media performance.

Learning the Media

(Daily Mirror) Cinema proclaims its offer of a discrete text by way of publicity posters (although more and more cinema chains are advertising their films on television and on radio) and display advertisments in local newspapers.

Learning the Media

This book is designed to offer an introduction for teachers, students and interested general readers to both recent theoretical and critical work in media analysis and to outline how to analyse media institutions. It includes suggestions for teaching practice and proposals for the construction of an alternative pedagogy.

Film and Female Consciousness

Lucy Bolton compares these recent works with well-known and influential films that offer more familiar treatments of female subjectivity: Klute (1971), The Seven Year Itch (1955) and Marnie (1964).

Film and Female Consciousness

Film and Female Consciousness analyses three contemporary films that offer complex and original representations of women's thoughtfulness and individuality: In the Cut (2003), Lost in Translation (2003) and Morvern Callar (2002). Lucy Bolton compares these recent works with well-known and influential films that offer more familiar treatments of female subjectivity: Klute (1971), The Seven Year Itch (1955) and Marnie (1964). Considering each of the older, celebrated films alongside the recent, unconventional works illustrates how contemporary filmmaking techniques and critical practices can work together to create provocative depictions of on-screen female consciousness. Bolton's approach demonstrates how the encounter between the philosophy of Luce Irigaray and cinema can yield a fuller understanding of the fundamental relationship between film and philosophy. Furthermore, the book explores the implications of this approach for filmmakers and spectators, and suggests Irigarayan models of authorship and spectatorship that reinvigorate the notion of women's cinema.

Photography FAQs Black and White

The finished look of a print from a black-and-white film negative is a combination of many things. Different films are sensitive to different ... Most offer films such as Kodak Tri-X with its distinct contrast, grain and tonality.

Photography FAQs  Black and White

Photography FAQs: Black and White covers every aspect of black & white photography, from capturing the image to filtration, to developing and printing an image and successful presentation.The title offers detailed responses to the key, reader-defined questions drawn from photographic workshops, consumer press and internet forums, and, as such, is an invaluable and handy reference.The Photography FAQs series is a comprehensive, pocket-size reference for the amateur photographer in the field (or the studio). Each title is formulated as an encyclopaedia of 50 questions and answers covering every aspect of the key photography subjects that come up again and again, including genres such as landscape, portraiture and travel and shooting in monochrome. Each topic is supported by lively, accessible text, inspirational images and clear, easy-to-navigate design that makes this series a quick-and easy reference.

Beyond the Living Dead

However, his twentieth-century zombie films offer no reassurance from either governmental agencies, which divulge contradictory or downright irresponsible information, or any sort of patriarchal figure. His zombies are humans gone bad, ...

Beyond the Living Dead

In 1968, George Romero's film Night of the Living Dead premiered, launching a growing preoccupation with zombies within mass and literary fiction, film, television, and video games. Romero's creativity and enduring influence make him a worthy object of inquiry in his own right, and his long career helps us take stock of the shifting interest in zombies since the 1960s. Examining his work promotes a better understanding of the current state of the zombie and where it is going amidst the political and social turmoil of the twenty-first century. These new essays document, interpret, and explain the meaning of the still-budding Romero legacy, drawing cross-disciplinary perspectives from such fields as literature, political science, philosophy, and comparative film studies. Essays consider some of the sources of Romero's inspiration (including comics, science fiction, and Westerns), chart his influence as a storyteller and a social critic, and consider the legacy he leaves for viewers, artists, and those studying the living dead.

Movement and Performance in Berlin School Cinema

While not all performance tracked in Movement and Performance in Berlin School Cinema can be subsumed under the figure of the fugitive body, this figure nonetheless offers a compelling thematic basis to contemplate the broader ...

Movement and Performance in Berlin School Cinema

“A rich and welcome addition to the surge of scholarly interest in the Berlin School.” —Studies in European Cinema Through a study of the contemporary German film movement the Berlin School, Olivia Landry examines how narrative film has responded to our highly digitalized and mediatized age, not with a focus on stasis and realism, but by turning back to movement, spectacle, and performance. She argues that a preoccupation with presence, liveness, and affect—all of which are viewed as critical components of live performance—can be found in many of the films of the Berlin School. Challenging the perception that the Berlin School is a sheer adherent of “slow cinema,” Landry closely analyzes the use of movement, dynamism, presence, and speed in a broad selection of films to show how filmmakers such as Christian Petzold, Angela Schanelec, Thomas Arslan, and Christoph Hochhäusler invoke the pulse of the kinesthetic and the tangibly affective. Her analysis draws on an array of film theories from early materialism to body theories, phenomenology, and contemporary affect theories. Arguing that these theories readily and energetically forge a path from film to performance, Landry traces a trajectory between the two through which live experience, presence, spectacle, intersubjectivity, and the body in motion emerge and powerfully intersect. Ultimately, Movement and Performance in Berlin School Cinema expands the methodological and disciplinary boundaries of film studies by offering new ways of articulating and understanding movement in cinema.

Native Americans on Film

The film offers a powerful glimpse of the mistreatment of First Nations people; Kahentiiosta is the only woman still imprisoned after the others are released because she refuses to give the Quebec lawyer her Canadian name.

Native Americans on Film

“An essential book for courses on Native film, indigenous media, not to mention more general courses . . . A very impressive and useful collection.” —Randolph Lewis, author of Navajo Talking Picture The film industry and mainstream popular culture are notorious for promoting stereotypical images of Native Americans: the noble and ignoble savage, the pronoun-challenged sidekick, the ruthless warrior, the female drudge, the princess, the sexualized maiden, the drunk, and others. Over the years, Indigenous filmmakers have both challenged these representations and moved past them, offering their own distinct forms of cinematic expression. Native Americans on Film draws inspiration from the Indigenous film movement, bringing filmmakers into an intertextual conversation with academics from a variety of disciplines. The resulting dialogue opens a myriad of possibilities for engaging students with ongoing debates: What is Indigenous film? Who is an Indigenous filmmaker? What are Native filmmakers saying about Indigenous film and their own work? This thought-provoking text offers theoretical approaches to understanding Native cinema, includes pedagogical strategies for teaching particular films, and validates the different voices, approaches, and worldviews that emerge across the movement. “Accomplished scholars in the emerging field of Native film studies, Marubbio and Buffalohead . . . focus clearly on the needs of this field. They do scholars and students of Native film a great service by reprinting four seminal and provocative essays.” —James Ruppert, author of Meditation in Contemporary Native American Literature “Succeed[s] in depicting the complexities in study, teaching, and creating Native film . . . Regardless of an individual’s level of knowledge and expertise in Native film, Native Americans on Film is a valuable read for anyone interested in this topic.” —Studies in American Indian Literatures

Transcultural Cinema

Even if it were possible to devise codes that would allow film to approach the forms of written anthropology , one must ask whether such an approach would open ... place of the monologues of previous films they offer areas of inquiry .

Transcultural Cinema

David MacDougall is a pivotal figure in the development of ethnographic cinema and visual anthropology. As a filmmaker, he has directed in Africa, Australia, India, and Europe. His prize-winning films (many made jointly with his wife, Judith MacDougall) include The Wedding Camels, Lorang's Way, To Live with Herds, A Wife among Wives, Takeover, PhotoWallahs, and Tempus de Baristas. As a theorist, he articulates central issues in the relation of film to anthropology, and is one of the few documentary filmmakers who writes extensively on these concerns. The essays collected here address, for instance, the difference between films and written texts and between the position of the filmmaker and that of the anthropological writer. In fact, these works provide an overview of the history of visual anthropology, as well as commentaries on specific subjects, such as point-of-view and subjectivity, reflexivity, the use of subtitles, and the role of the cinema subject. Refreshingly free of jargon, each piece belongs very much to the tradition of the essay in its personal engagement with exploring difficult issues. The author ultimately disputes the view that ethnographic filmmaking is merely a visual form of anthropology, maintaining instead that it is a radical anthropological practice, which challenges many of the basic assumptions of the discipline of anthropology itself. Although influential among filmmakers and critics, some of these essays were published in small journals and have been until now difficult to find. The three longest pieces, including the title essay, are new.

Rent Two Films and Let s Talk in the Morning

In addition, this updated edition: Provides concise descriptions of dozens of popular videos and shows how they can be used as therapy for specific therapeutic needs (divorce, child abuse, substance abuse, etc.) Contains a revised ...

Rent Two Films and Let s Talk in the Morning

Unlock the emotional roadblocks that can inhibit or interfere with the success of therapy Videowork is the therapeutic process in which therapists assign popular films that relate to core issues of ongoing therapy. Clients are instructed to do their "homework" between sessions and prepare for discussion in future sessions. Rent Two Films and Let's Talk in the Morning explores how therapeutic work interwoven with popular films enhances traditional therapy. This much-anticipated revision provides an introduction to using movie rentals in therapy and serves as a ready reference for therapists who want to assign videos as homework. Authors John and Jan Hesley address the dilemmas that you may face when deciding when it is appropriate to assign a film, and offer friendly guidance and detailed information on every aspect of using films as tools in therapy. In addition, this updated edition: * Provides concise descriptions of dozens of popular videos and shows how they can be used as therapy for specific therapeutic needs (divorce, child abuse, substance abuse, etc.) * Contains a revised organizational structure, covering therapy topics based on patient issues frequently encountered in therapy, including marital problems, parenting, job stress, abuse, and emotional disorders * Offers suggestions on selecting films, creating assignments, and processing homework * Provides newly released film reviews, along with 40 additional films with brief descriptions, in the "Therapists' Film Reference"

Wiley Blackwell Companion to Wisdom Literature

Other films offer more substantive reflections on their close relationship to Job. Like Job, Life of Pi (d. Lee, 2012) laments the injustice of undeserved human suffering. The film offers the provocative suggestion – absent in Job ...

Wiley Blackwell Companion to Wisdom Literature

A comprehensive introduction to ancient wisdom literature, with fascinating essays on a broad range of topics. The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Wisdom Literature is a wide-ranging introduction to the texts, themes, and receptions of the wisdom literature of the Bible and the ancient world. This comprehensive volume brings together original essays from established scholars and emerging voices to offer a variety of perspectives on the “wisdom” biblical books, early Christian and rabbinic literature, and beyond. Varied and engaging essays provide fresh insights on topics of timeless relevance, exploring the distinct features of instructional texts and discussing their interpretation in both antiquity and the modern world. Designed for non-specialists, this accessible volume provides readers with balanced coverage of traditional biblical wisdom texts, including Proverbs, Job, Psalms, and Ecclesiastes; lesser-known Egyptian and Mesopotamian wisdom; and African proverbs. The contributors explore topics ranging from scribes and pedagogy in ancient Israel, to representations of biblical wisdom literature in contemporary cinema. Offering readers a fresh and interesting way to engage with wisdom literature, this book: Discusses sapiential books and traditions in various historical and cultural contexts Offers up-to-date discussion on the study of the biblical wisdom books Features essays on the history of interpretation and theological reception Includes essays covering the antecedents and afterlife of the texts Part of the acclaimed Wiley Blackwell Companions to Religion series, the Companion to Wisdom Literature is a valuable resource for university, seminary and divinity school students and instructors, scholars and researchers, and general readers with interest in the subject.

Women in European Holocaust Films

Chapter 8 indicates a shift in the representation of female perpetrators, marked by two recent films: Downfall (2004) and The Reader (2008). These films offer more nuanced portrayals and challenge viewers to reflect upon and interrogate ...

Women in European Holocaust Films

This book considers how women’s experiences have been treated in films dealing with Nazi persecution. Focusing on fiction films made in Europe between 1945 and the present, this study explores dominant discourses on and cinematic representation of women as perpetrators, victims and resisters. Ingrid Lewis contends that European Holocaust Cinema underwent a rich and complex trajectory of change with regard to the representation of women. This change both reflects and responds to key socio-cultural developments in the intervening decades as well as to new directions in cinema, historical research and politics of remembrance. The book will appeal to international scholars, students and educators within the fields of Holocaust Studies, Film Studies, European Cinema and Women’s Studies.

Interface Analysis and Engineering of Thin Functional Films on Metals

Bi-layer or composite polymer films offer the possibility of combining the properties of two different polymers in one coating system. Using plasma polymer deposition many investigations have focused on the development of metal/polymer ...

Interface Analysis and Engineering of Thin Functional Films on Metals


A Companion to British and Irish Cinema

The list might be stretched to include films such as Orlando (Sally Potter, 1992), or even Angels and Insects (Philip Haas, 1995).4 In contrast with the other strands of cinema mentioned above, these heritage films offer a refuge.

A Companion to British and Irish Cinema

A stimulating overview of the intellectual arguments and critical debates involved in the study of British and Irish cinemas British and Irish film studies have expanded in scope and depth in recent years, prompting a growing number of critical debates on how these cinemas are analysed, contextualized, and understood. A Companion to British and Irish Cinema addresses arguments surrounding film historiography, methods of textual analysis, critical judgments, and the social and economic contexts that are central to the study of these cinemas. Twenty-nine essays from many of the most prominent writers in the field examine how British and Irish cinema have been discussed, the concepts and methods used to interpret and understand British and Irish films, and the defining issues and debates at the heart of British and Irish cinema studies. Offering a broad scope of commentary, the Companion explores historical, cultural and aesthetic questions that encompass over a century of British and Irish film studies—from the early years of the silent era to the present-day. Divided into five sections, the Companion discusses the social and cultural forces shaping British and Irish cinema during different periods, the contexts in which films are produced, distributed and exhibited, the genres and styles that have been adopted by British and Irish films, issues of representation and identity, and debates on concepts of national cinema at a time when ideas of what constitutes both ‘British’ and ‘Irish’ cinema are under question. A Companion to British and Irish Cinema is a valuable and timely resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students of film, media, and cultural studies, and for those seeking contemporary commentary on the cinemas of Britain and Ireland.

Charles Urban

However, the film catalogue offered the opportunity for a greater sense of a world on offer, with longer descriptions necessary to encompass complex action; coming out of these was a sense of discovery. The films offer not merely the ...

Charles Urban

Based on original research from Charles Urban’s own papers, this is the first biography of this influential film maker and innovator. It is also a historical study of the development of the non-fiction film in Britain and America in the early years of cinema, told through the experiences of the leading pioneer of the form. Charles Urban was a renowned figure in his time, and he has remained a name in film history chiefly for his development of Kinemacolor, the world’s first successful natural colour moving picture system. He was also a pioneer in the filming of war, science, travel, actuality and news, a fervent advocate of the value of film as an educative force, and a controversial but important innovator of film propaganda in wartime. The book uses Urban’s story as a means of showing how the non-fiction film developed in the period 1897-1925, and the dilemmas that it faced within a cinema culture in which the entertainment fiction film was dominant. Urban’s solutions – some successful, some less so – illustrate the groundwork that led to the development of documentary film. The book considers the roles of film as informer, educator and generator of propaganda, and the social and aesthetic function of colour in the years when cinema was still working out what it was capable of and how best to reach audiences. Luke McKernan also curates a web resource on Charles Urban at www.charlesurban.com Winner of the Kraszna-Krausz Moving Image Book Award 2014.

Slave Revolt on Screen

I argue that the Revolution's presences and absences in cinema offer unparalleled insight into these topics. As Natalie Zemon Davis noted in Slaves on Screen: Film and Historical Vision (2000), “slavery has been a subject of films since ...

Slave Revolt on Screen

In Slave Revolt on Screen: The Haitian Revolution in Film and Video Games author Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall analyzes how films and video games from around the world have depicted slave revolt, focusing on the Haitian Revolution (1791–1804). This event, the first successful revolution by enslaved people in modern history, sent shock waves throughout the Atlantic World. Regardless of its historical significance however, this revolution has become less well-known—and appears less often on screen—than most other revolutions; its story, involving enslaved Africans liberating themselves through violence, does not match the suffering-slaves-waiting-for-a-white-hero genre that pervades Hollywood treatments of Black history. Despite Hollywood’s near-silence on this event, some films on the Revolution do exist—from directors in Haiti, the US, France, and elsewhere. Slave Revolt on Screen offers the first-ever comprehensive analysis of Haitian Revolution cinema, including completed films and planned projects that were never made. In addition to studying cinema, this book also breaks ground in examining video games, a pop-culture form long neglected by historians. Sepinwall scrutinizes video game depictions of Haitian slave revolt that appear in games like the Assassin’s Creed series that have reached millions more players than comparable films. In analyzing films and games on the revolution, Slave Revolt on Screen calls attention to the ways that economic legacies of slavery and colonialism warp pop-culture portrayals of the past and leave audiences with distorted understandings.