Finding Your Way After Your Parent Dies

Finding Your Way after Your Parent Dies: Hope for Grieving Adults.

Finding Your Way After Your Parent Dies

Rev. Richard Gilbert has created a compassionate guide for those struggling with the loss of a parent. From the disorientation that can come immediately after death to healing old emotional wounds, the topics dealt with here will be of tremendous help to many.

Finding a Sacred Oasis in Grief

This book will help children talk about their memories of a loved one . • Gilbert , Richard ( 1999 ) . Finding Your Way After Your Parent Dies . Notre Dame , IN : Ave Maria Press . This book offers wise guidance for those who have lost ...

Finding a Sacred Oasis in Grief

Aimed at pastoral care providers, counsellors, therapists and other health professionals as well as students, this is a practical manual suitable for all carers.

The Living Church

Finding Your Way After Your Parent Dies is a resource that will be appreciated by those who have lost a parent and ... His attempt to “ demythologize " the word “ father ” is intriguing , but it seems to invalidate the very creed he is ...

The Living Church


Grievers Ask

When Your Baby Dies through Miscarriage or Stillbirth . Minneapolis : Augsburg Books . ... Wise advice for your child's first significant death experience . Huntley , Theresa . ( 1991 ) . ... Finding Your Way after Your Parent Dies .

Grievers Ask

In his counseling work, Harold Ivan Smith has heard most of the questions--even the most obscure, personal, and difficult ones--that occur to grievers as they process their loss. Here he compiles more than 150 common questions, explores the emotions behind them, and provides clear and forthright responses. Whether readers find the answers they seek, new perspectives to ponder, or comfort from knowing that others ask similar questions, this valuable resource will guide individuals who are in the midst of grief and those who wish to provide comfort.

Death Dying Life Living

Finding your way after your parent dies: Help for grieving adults. Notre Dame, IN: Ave Maria Press. Gill, D. L. (1980). Quest: The life of Elisabeth Kübler-Ross. New York: Harper & Row. Gill, T. M., Gahbauer, E. A., Han, ...

Death   Dying  Life   Living

Practical and inspiring, DEATH & DYING, LIFE & LIVING, 8th Edition helps students learn how to navigate encounters with death, dying, and bereavement. The authors integrate classical and contemporary material, present task-based approaches for individual and family coping, and include four chapters devoted to death-related issues faced by children, adolescents, young and middle-aged adults, and older adults. They also discuss a variety of cultural and religious perspectives that affect people's understanding and practices associated with such encounters. Practical guidelines for constructive communication encourage productive living in the face of death. You can use this book as a primary textbook for undergraduate and graduate courses in death, dying, and bereavement; as a supplementary text in related courses; or as a general resource. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Raising Our Children to Be Resilient

Finding Your Way after Your Parent Dies. Notre Dame, IN: Ave Maria Press. This book provides inspiration and hope for grieving adults who have had a parent die. Golden, T. (1994). Swallowed by a Snake. Gaithersburg, MD: Golden Healing.

Raising Our Children to Be Resilient

In this timely and much-needed book, Linda Goldman addresses the many frightening events that impact our children by providing the reader with a seamless mixture of theory and practice garnered from her extensive experience in the field. Raising Our Children to Be Resilient includes trauma resolution techniques and case studies, discussions of the respective roles played by parents, teachers and the larger community as well as additional resources for those in a position to help children who have been traumatized. The goal of Raising Our Children to Be Resilient is exactly what its title promises: to help children through their pain and confusion and guide them into a flexible and compassionate adulthood.

Step Into Our Lives at the Funeral Home

Finding your way after your parent dies. Notre Dame, IN: Ave Marie Press (First Printing, 1999). Grollman, E. A. (Ed.). (1999). Bereaved children & teens: A support guide for parents and professionals. Boston, MA: Beacon Press.

Step Into Our Lives at the Funeral Home

Many people are curious about what goes on behind the scenes at a funeral home. Add a live-in family to this scenario, and you'll Step Into Our Lives at the Funeral Home. Shh! Be quiet! There's someone at the door! Don't ever talk about anything you have seen or heard concerning someone's death outside the walls of our home. Mourning families need to know they can trust our integrity and our ability to keep confidentiality. For the author's family, these admonitions were ingrained in the children's minds at an early age. This book gives an insightful view of every facet of the funeral, from the time a death call is received until the funeral is completed. Stories of days in the ambulance business in conjunction with the funeral home are also related. The funeral director's role, the spouse's role, the children's role, and how the children thrived in an atmosphere of death are shared with the reader. How funeral directors cope with stress and how wives cope with their husbands during these times are revealed. Years later, following a tragic death, three people look back and share their stories of moving from despair to recovery. Interspersed through every chapter are stories and vignettes shared by many funeral directors throughout the Midwest, concerning the lifestyle for the family living in the funeral home and true incidents of specific funerals. Some stories are sad. Others are tragic. A few are humorous. Embracing faith, hope, and love is a primary requisite for healing. Intended audience: General readers of all ages, funeral home directors, hospice patients, mortuary students, and people who have had a loved one die by natural means or tragedy.

Losing Your Parents Finding Yourself

This book fills that gap. Backed by her original study and filled with compelling case histories, Secunda's book explores what happens to men and women when they are on their own in ways they have never been before.

Losing Your Parents  Finding Yourself

An eloquent book that explores the impact on one's life of losing a parent as an adult, and the effect it has on families, careers, and friendships -- now in paperback. Losing a parent is an event that happens, sooner or later, to nearly everyone. Yet seldom has the impact of parental death on the identities of adult offspring been examined. This book fills that gap. Backed by her original study and filled with compelling case histories, Secunda's book explores what happens to men and women when they are on their own in ways they have never been before. She addresses myriad issues, including: What does it mean to be living without parents to please or rebel against? How does adult "orphanhood" alter relationships with one's siblings, partner, friends, children, or one's career choices? How does it reshape one's sense of self? Losing Your Parents, Finding Your Self offers the assurance that out of loss can come unforeseen gain -- that on the other side of sorrow, we can discover new hope, wisdom, and strength.

Living Loving and Loss

Always too soon: Voices of support for those who have lost both parents. Emeryville, CA: Seal Press. Gilbert, R. (1999). Finding your way after your parent dies: Hope for adults. Notre Dame, IN: Ave Maria.

Living  Loving and Loss

One of the unspoken aspects of mourning concerns the ways that loss affects our intimate relationships and our sexual expressiveness. This text opens these subjects for conversation, with the aim of promoting the trust, care, and respect that enable us to be vulnerable. It purposefully covers a range of topics, including: (1) the meaning of intimacy and the significance of sexuality, providing a basis for the use of these terms throughout the book; (2) death, grief, and differences in sexual orientation, including death and intimacy in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community and the losses endured by young people due to gender issues; (3) loss of relationship and restoration of intimacy in families, including pharmacological effects on the grief processes of widowers; grieving a not-so-loved parent; the "layered losses" of infertility and intimacy; and the tolls of war--intimacy and sexuality challenges for soldiers and their families; (4) adjusting to life's losses associated with aging or illness or infirmity, including Alzheimer's and dementia-related illnesses, physical health losses after 50, and intimacy, sex, and hospice--self-determination and dignity at the end of life; and (5) religious bases that have shaped our perspectives for understanding intimacy, sexuality, and healing after loss, and which give us hope--including the spiritual reflections of a rabbi and a Christian voice in defining what is right. Set in a framework that is both psychological and spiritual, the well-researched contributions are intended to acknowledge these experiences both professionally and personally. The book concludes with an extensive bibliography, valuable for research and reference. This book will be of value in undergraduate and graduate courses on thanatology, as well as for anyone interested in knowing more about grief--both those currently bereaved and those who wish to support others in mourning. The contributors appreciate both the importance of our capacities for intimacy and sexuality and our inhibitions and hesitations in giving voice to our needs and concerns, perhaps especially when we are grieving. The information and compassionate understanding they provide encourage us to bridge the gap between the secret and the private and to share what is close to our hearts.

Singing Mother Home

Finding Your Way After Your Parent Dies—Richard Gilbert & Darcie Sims (1999) IN: Ave Maria Press. How to Survive the Loss of a Parent—Lois Akner (1993) NY: William Morrow. Longing to Live . . .Learning to Die—Donn Weinholtz (2002) p 151 ...

Singing Mother Home

A therapist and expert on grief is faced with the slow decline of her beloved mother. She imparts to the reader lessons learned, both personal and professional, in anticipating grief and the loss of a loved one. 'This is a unique book by a professional who understands the field of loss and grief ... Poignantly heartbreaking.' - Melba Vasquez, President, American Psychology Association's Division on Counseling Psychology.

Finding Your Way To Heaven Without a Smartphone

The Night My Body Split in Two One of my childhood intrigues was the existential dilemma of life and death. ... I think my dad sensed my fear of death because I always pestered him and my mother with questions about dying.

Finding Your Way To Heaven Without a Smartphone

In efforts to understand the human being, our history, and our future, the story takes the reader through three different continents, gleaning cultural well-being and malaise of different races. The book highlights the common bond between all human races, while exploring reasons for the perceived outer differences our modern world hurtles forward, driven as it is by powerful technological engines of change, characterized by an obsessive and often idolatrous worship of intelligence, ruminative men and women all around the world ponder in the silence of their soul the fate of humanity. In the West, depression, suicide, incomprehensible mass shootings and myriad psychological disorders litter our cultural landscape, while abject poverty ravage developing nations. We have become highly intelligent beings that cannot solve our problems, yet we inhabit a natural world created out of wisdom and much of that wisdom is not reflected in our thoughts and lifestyle Modern man's obsession with intelligence and the material world has left him a stranger to spiritual things and wisdom. Consequently, humanity is left vulnerable to inexplicable and undiagnosed suffering. in an attempt to diagnose what ails modern man, this book presents a convincing and thought-provoking argument that we have forgotten who we are, and in so doing, have built a world terribly out of order with our divine nature. By walking the reader through my Nigerian upbringing and subsequent arrival in the West, I reveal some timeless wisdom that I believe can serve as a cure for some of the things that trouble us today. This inimitable book lights a path directing us again to who we truly are. It is a timely and deft clarion call to all of us. Finding Your Way to Heaven Without a Smartphone is a mixture of autobiography, cultural inquiry and philosophy. Joseph Obidiegwu, an Igbo from Nigeria, has lived on three continents. He has the necessary perspective and wisdom to look at the world's masquerade from different angles. There is no romanticization of traditional African village life, nor is there blind acceptance of the hectic to and fro of modern life on planet Smartphone. Don Burness, Ph.D. Professor of Literature at Franklin Pierce College Author of Echoes of the Sunbird and Wanasema Keywords: Inimitable, Interesting, Insightful, Autobiographical, Philosophical, Spiritual, Cultural, Thought-Provoking, Inspiring, Life-Changing

Is God Still at the Bedside

When Your Baby Dies Through Miscarriage or Stillbirth. Hope and Healing Series. Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 2002. Gilbert, Richard. Finding Your Way After Your Parent Dies. Notre Dame, IN: Ave Maria Press, 1999. Greyson, Bruce.

Is God Still at the Bedside

Is God Still at the Bedside? by Abigail Rian Evans offers an expert interdisciplinary Christian perspective on the complex web of issues surrounding death and dying. Evans here combines first-person stories and interviews with research gathered from the medical, theological, legal, ethical, and pastoral disciplines. Her comprehensive, insightful work will not only benefit families struggling with difficult end-of-life decisions but also inform the doctors, nurses, and pastors who serve them. Book jacket.

Getting Through the Night Finding Your Way After the Loss of a Loved One

Some children heave sighs of relief when the troublesome elderly parent dies. But is any of this the point? Isn't the point God Himself? Is it ludicrous to believe, really to lay hold of the promises of God—about anything that has to do ...

Getting Through the Night  Finding Your Way After the Loss of a Loved One

Find comfort for grief and loss in this inspirational book. Eugenia Price, one of our most beloved inspirational writers, offers this simply written yet profoundly valuable book for anyone struggling through the loss of a loved one. She writes that the healing process comes first from the knowledge that accepting the loss does not mean we stop missing our loved one. Written simply and sensitively, Price demonstrates a sympathetic and hopeful view of the grieving process through insights into human nature and in her own experiences with death.

Handbook of Thanatology

In E. Grollman, (Ed.), Bereaved children and teens: A support guide for parents and professionals. Boston, MA: Beacon Press. Gilbert, R. (1999). Finding your way after your parent dies. Notre Dame, IN: Ave Maria Press.

Handbook of Thanatology

If ever there was an area requiring that the research-practice gap be bridged, surely it occurs where thanatologists engage with people dealing with human mortality and loss. The field of thanatology—the study of death and dying—is a complex, multidisciplinary area that encompases the range of human experiences, emotions, expectations, and realities. The Handbook of Thanatology is the most authoritative volume in the field, providing a single source of up-to-date scholarship, research, and practice implications. The handbook is the recommended resource for preparation for the prestigious certificate in thanatology (CT) and fellow in thanatology (FT) credentials, which are administered and granted by ADEC.

20 Life Transforming Choices Adoptees Need to Make Second Edition

Freedom to be true to their own growth process and cheerfully dismiss the insensitive remarks of others. ... BCC, D. Min., is the director of the World Pastoral Care Center and author of Finding Your Way After Your Parent Dies: Hope for ...

20 Life Transforming Choices Adoptees Need to Make  Second Edition

As an adoptee, do you have mixed feelings about your adoption? If you do, you are not alone - adoptees often experience complex feelings of grief, anger, and questions about their identity. Sherrie Eldridge is an adoptee and adoption expert, and in this book she draws on her personal experiences and feelings relating to adoption as well as interviews with over 70 adoptees. Sherrie reveals how you can discover your own unique life purpose and worth, and sets out 20 life-transforming choices which you have the power to make. The choices will help you discover answers about issues such as: Why do I feel guilty when I think about my birth parents? Why can't I talk about the painful aspects of adoption? Where can I gain an unshakable sense of self-esteem? Sherrie also addresses the problem of depression among adoptees and common dilemmas such as if, when and how to contact a birth mother or father. This fully updated second edition includes new material on finding support online, contacting family through social media, and features three new chapters, including Sherrie's story of reuniting with her birth brother, Jon, in adulthood.

Final Acts

Finding your way after your parent dies: Hope for grieving adults (6th printing). Notre Dame, IN: Ave Maria Press. Gilbert, R. (2012). Heart peace: Healing help for grieving folks (Rev. Ed.). Omaha, NE: Centering. Goldman, L. (2000).

Final Acts

The editors undertook this project to promote the International Conference on Death, Grief, and Bereavement in La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA. Throughout its history, the conference has attracted internationally known speakers. This book illustrates the quality of their presentations. Section One, "Professional Applications in End of Life Care," begins with Currier, Hammer, and Neimeyer's examination of the importance of the social network, including both religion and family, not just the individual, in working with those at the end of their lives. The authors analyse the impact of social support and its health implications. In Chapter 2, Parkes looks at the influence of child development on adult life and bereavement. Rather than simply showing how insecure child development affects loss as adults, he examines how insecure attachments in childhood can lead to extreme attachments to God, homes, territories, political leaders, and symbols and discusses interventions for these extreme attachments. Papadatou (Chapter 3) develops a model for professionals and caregivers who work with the dying. She suggests that those who give care to the dying also have multiple needs and also face suffering, examines the private world of professionals and what is healthy and what is unavoidable, and describes both functional and dysfunctional coping patterns used by professionals. Kobler (Chapter 4) uses case studies to explain how to develop and maintain relationships with children and their families in paediatric palliative care. She offers strategies for using rituals and ways to initiate and maintain relationships with children and their families. Thompson (Chapter 5) focuses on the effects of working in situations involving high levels of emotion and the stress that may result. He makes a strong case that such stress can do harm to individuals, groups, and whole organisations and offers a model for a more holistic approach that incorporates social and organisational strategies and practical ways to prevent and manage stress. Eves-Baine and colleagues (Chapter 6) examine the application of paediatric and adult-based principles to the newborn period. They discuss how to create the best situations for families when life-sustaining medical therapy has been withdrawn, how to support the family, and the ethical challenges that perinatal palliative care presents. The authors offer models for care through the journey of palliative and bereavement care. Section Two, "Facing End of Life and Its Care," begins with Gilbert's chapter presenting a strong argument that caregivers need to honour the multiple tracks that come with dying while maintaining a focus on the wishes of the dying person. He offers ways for the team to better meet the needs of the dying person. Koppleman (Chapter 8) follows the journey of a friend who faced death. It is a powerful story, told from the point of view of the dying in a scholarly fashion. Smith and Potter (Chapter 9) suggest that palliative care for the dying can be defined as offering "comfort care," both for those who are dying and for their loved ones. The authors present a model of the psycho-spiritual side of palliative care as a way of offering comfort to all those involved. Adams (Chapter 10) examines different methods of working with patients and families. It looks at the ways in which such work can be complicated by factors of geographic distance, differences in family reactions, differences in treatment plan concepts, and in meaning making. All of these factors may become stumbling blocks and may prevent the delivery of positive support. Pizzini (Chapter 11) looks at the experience of dying in prison from the perspective of inmates who are terminally ill, prison medical staff, and prison security staff. She discusses how to maintain dignity of the dying and a "good death" while in prison. McCord (Chapter 12) discusses attempts by hospice patients and others diagnosed with terminal illnesses to die either by their own hand or with physician assistance. She presents common risk factors, strategies to assess the degree of risk and possible plans for suicide and suicide postvention in the context of hospice. Section Three, "Cultural Considerations in End-of-Life Care" begins with The End of Life: Two Perspectives in which Robert G. Stevenson looks at two perspectives on the end of life that are not often examined in terms of their impact on the individual and his/her attitude toward this time. The two perspectives are that of adolescents, and that are shown in a military ceremony used in the 18th and 19th centuries, the Feu de Joie or Fire of Joy. In Chapter Fourteen, Janet McCord discusses suicide attempts by hospice patients and others diagnosed with terminal illnesses to die either by their own hand or with physician assistance. Connor's description of the need for hospice and palliative care around the world and the challenges of developing palliative care globally, and offers models that can be used around the world. Cox and Cox (Chapter 15) suggest ways to offer end-of-life care to Roman Catholics who do not fit the traditional model of hospice care and examine special needs, theology, and rituals. Cox and Sullivan (Chapter 16) offer suggestions on end-of-life care for American Indians, explaining cultural differences among American Indians and suggesting ways to improve care to a group that is generally neglected in hospice care. Smith (Chapter 17) looks at the cultural differences and understandings of Fundamentalist Christian views of a "good death" and the afterlife, ways to negotiate faith understandings that complicate end-of-life care, and ways to comfort individuals who may be marginalised because they do not share the theological views of the dying individual or key family members.

Death and Bereavement Around the World

Finding your way after your parent dies: Hope for adults. Notre Dame, IN: Ave Maria Press. Gilbert, R. (Ed.). (2002). Healthcare & spirituality: Listening, assessing, caring. Amityville, NY: Baywood. Grollman, E. (2000).

Death and Bereavement Around the World

This final volume of ""Death and Bereavement Around the World"" reflects on some major themes: death and after-life, religion and spirituality, rites and rituals, secularist approaches, cultural variations, suicide, and other issues. The first few chapters describe progress in end-of-life care, including some new tools to evaluate hospice care (chapter 1); what children know, when they know it, and how parents can respond to questions, with some guidelines for support by schools (chapter 2); the importance of ritual (chapter 3); and, gender differences in death customs around the world (chapter 4).The transcript of a 1997 interview of John (Jack) Morgan by Pittu Laungani is presented as chapter 5. The following chapters discuss death systems and suicide (chapter 6); HIV/AIDS, including the role of cultural and economic factors in the spread of the disease (chapter 7); and grief and bereavement in the developing world, taking the AIDS pandemic as a specific challenge (chapter 8). Chapter 9 covers issues related to dying and death in Romania. In chapter 10 the focus is on the various functions and uses of names in a cross-cultural context. Roadside memorials as a pivotal healing strategy are the topic of chapter 11. Chapters 12 and 13 focus on spiritual experience with loss.The final chapter presents some conclusions, and in the Epilogue, Mary Ann Morgan honors the life, career, dying, death, and achievements of John (Jack) Morgan. The 'Final Word' includes the words of Pittu Laungani, from a book published just weeks before his death in February 2007.This work is for anyone interested in or working in death and bereavement issues, particularly academics, educators, librarians, chaplains, clergy, funeral service directors, hospice care providers and volunteers, palliative care providers, nurses, immigration officers, psychologists, social workers, psychotherapists, and counselors, especially bereavement counselors.

The Group Therapist s Notebook

link this analogy to their life experiences related to their grief. ... Bereaved children and teens: A support guide for parents and professionals. Boston: Beacon. ... Finding your way after your parent dies: Hope for grieving adults.

The Group Therapist s Notebook

Get innovative ideas and effective interventions for your group therapy Group work requires facilitators to use different skills than they would use in individual or family therapy. The Group Therapist’s Notebook: Homework, Handouts, and Activities for Use in Psychotherapy offers facilitators effective strategies to gather individuals who have their own unique needs together to form a group where each member feels comfortable exploring personal—and often painful—topics. This resource provides creative handouts, homework, and activities along with practical ideas and interventions appropriate for a variety of problems and population types. Each chapter gives detailed easy-to-follow instructions, activity contraindications, and suggestions for tracking the intervention in successive meetings. Every intervention is backed by a theoretical or practical rationale for use, and many chapters feature a helpful illustrative clinical vignette. Group work has several benefits, including the ability to treat a greater number of clients with fewer resources. Group therapy work also relies on various theories that may seem to be difficult to apply to clinical practice. The Group Therapist’s Notebook is a practical guide that builds a bridge between theory and practice with ease. The text provides help for psychotherapists who are either beginning group practice or already utilizing groups as part of their practice and need a fresh set of ideas. The workbook framework allows group specialists to generate approaches and modify exercises to fit the varying needs of their clients. This guide offers a wide variety of valid approaches that effectively address client concerns. The book provides therapists with tips and ideas for starting and facilitating a group, assists them through sets of interventions, activities, and assignments, then showcases a variety of interventions for needs-specific populations or problems. Special sections are included with interventions for teens, young adults, couples, and family groups. Interventions in The Group Therapist’s Notebook include: anger management skills ease feelings of shame and guilt substance use and abuse grief and loss positive body image guidance through change independence and belonging interpersonal skills coping skills crisis intervention strategies much, much more! The Group Therapist’s Notebook is an essential resource for both novice and more experienced practitioners working in the mental health field, including counselor educators, social workers, guidance counselors, prevention educators, and other group facilitators. Every nonprofit agency, counseling center, private practice, school, hospital, treatment facility, or training center that organizes and implements therapy groups of any type should have this guide in their library.

Caring for the Sick and Elderly

Finding Your Way after Your Parent Dies . Notre Dame , IN : Ave Maria Press , 1999 . Gordon , Beverly S. Toward Peace : Prayer for the Widowed . Cincinnati , OH : St. Anthony Messenger Press , 1990 . Groves , Richard .

Caring for the Sick and Elderly

This book highlights the various ways pastoral care ministers and parish volunteers can reach out to the sick and elderly. There are a wealth of ideas here for extending spiritual, sacramental, and charitable support to parishioners who are homebound, in nursing homes, or in hospitals. For many years, Sr. Marie Roccapriore has been involved with a parish program called Project H.E.A.L.--Homebound are Encouraged through Assistance in Love. The details of this program are provided in this book, along with forms and other reproducible information that will be useful in developing this type of program in your own parish. Also included is an extensive listing of resources that are invaluable for ministry with the sick and elderly. The creative ideas offered will motivate more involvement among children as well as adults, and bring positive results among the sick and elderly recipients who eagerly look forward to the compassionate and loving care of others. Personal examples and anecdotes help illustrate the ways that even the simplest gestures of care and concern can make a world of difference in the lives of the infirm.

Basic Types of Pastoral Care Counseling

Finding Your Way after Your Parent Dies: Hope for Grieving Adults. South Bend, Ind.: Ave Maria Press, 1999. ———, ed. Healthcare and Spirituality: Listening, Assessing, Caring. Amityville, N.Y.: Baywood, 2000. James, John W., and Russell ...

Basic Types of Pastoral Care   Counseling

em>Basic Types of Pastoral Care and Counseling remains the standard in pastoral and counseling. This third edition is enlarged and revised with updated resources, methods, exercises, and illustrations from actual counseling sessions. This book will help readers be sensitive to cultural diversity, ethical issues, and power dynamics as they practice holistic, growth-oriented pastoral care and counseling in the parish.