Frank Lloyd Wright

An Autobiography

Frank Lloyd Wright

Originally published: New York: Duell, Sloan and Pearce, 1943.

Frank Lloyd Wright Collected Writings: 1930-1932

Frank Lloyd Wright Collected Writings: 1930-1932

From Frank Lloyd Wright: Collected Writings, Volume 2 From "Two Lectures on Architecture": "Young man in architecture, wherever you are, whatever your age, or whatever our job, we-- the youth of America-- should be the psychological shock-troops thrown into action against corruption of this supreme American ideal. It will be for youth, in this sense, to win the day for freedom in architecture." "To the young man in architecture, the word radical should be a beautiful word. Radical means "of the root" or "to the root"-- begins at the beginning and the word stands up straight. Any architect should be radical by nature because it is not enough for him to begin where others have left off." From An Autobiography: "A house of the North. The whole was low, wide and snug, a broad shelter seeking fellowship with its surroundings. A house that could open to the breezes of summer and become like an open camp if need be. With Spring came music on the roofs for there were few dead spaces overhead, and the broad eaves so sheltered the windows that they were safely left open to the sweeping, soft air of the rain. Taliesin was grateful for care. Took what grooming it got and repaid it all with interest. Taliesin's order was such that when all was clean and in place its countenance beamed, wore a happy smile of well-being and welcome for all. It was intensely human, I believe."

Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings

Frank Lloyd Wright and the Johnson Wax Buildings

Thoroughly researched study of the design and construction of this radical, inspiring workplace draws on much unpublished archival material. From the genesis of the structurally unique Administration Building — its design development, innovations, and furnishings — to the construction and completion of the Research Towers, Lipman presents a wealth of information. 172 black-and-white illustrations.

Frank Lloyd Wright

A Bio-bibliography

Frank Lloyd Wright

A comprehensive guide to the literature on Frank Lloyd Wright.

Romanza:Ca.Arch.of F.L.Wright

Romanza:Ca.Arch.of F.L.Wright


Frank Lloyd Wright

His Life and His Architecture

Frank Lloyd Wright

A complete biography based on a wide range of previously untapped primary sources, covering Wright's private life, architecture, and role in American society, culture, and politics. Views Wright's buildings as biographical as well as social statements, analyzing his work by type, category, and individual structure. Examines Wright's struggle to develop a new artistic statement, his dramatic personal life, and his political and economic ideas, including those on cities, energy conservation, cooperative home building, and environmental preservation. Includes over 150 illustrations (photographs, floor plans, and drawings--many never before published), extensive footnotes, and the most exhaustive bibliography of Wright's published work available.

Years with Frank Lloyd Wright

Apprentice to Genius

Years with Frank Lloyd Wright

Insightful memoir by former apprentice presents a revealing portrait of Wright the man, the inspired teacher, the architect.

Frank Lloyd Wright Versus America

The 1930s

Frank Lloyd Wright Versus America

For his critics and biographers, the 1930s have always been the most challenging period of Frank Lloyd Wright's career. This fresh account by Donald Johnson, the first to make use of the architect's long-inaccessible archives at Taliesin West, is also the first to provide a balanced evaluation of Wright in the 1930s. It separates Wright's design activities from his self-promotion and places his philosophy of individualism within the context of the times.

Frank Lloyd Wright and Japan

The Role of Traditional Japanese Art and Architecture in the Work of Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright and Japan

This book is the first thorough account of Frank Lloyd Wright's relationship with Japan and its arts. It presents significant new information on the nature and extent of Wright's formal and philosophical debt to Japanese art and architecture. Eight primary channels of influence are examined in detail, from Japanese prints to specific individuals and publications, and the evidence of their impact on Wright is illustrated through a mixture of textual and drawn analyses.

Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright

A cultural icon who defined the twentieth-century American landscape, Frank Lloyd Wright has been studied from what seems to be every possible angle. While many books focus on his works, torrid personal life, or both, few solely consider his professional persona, as a man enmeshed in a web of prominent public figures and political ideas. In this new biography, Robert McCarter distills Wright’s life and work into a concise account that explores the beliefs and relationships so powerfully reflected in his architectural works. McCarter examines here how Wright aspired to influence America’s evolving democratic society by the challenges his buildings posed to traditional views of private and public space. He investigates Wright’s relationships with key leaders of art, industry, and society, and how their views came to have concrete significance in Wright’s work and writings. Wright argued that architecture should be the “background or framework” for daily life, not the “object,” and McCarter dissects how and why he aspired to this and other ideals, such as his belief in the ethical duty of architects to improve society and culture. A penetrating study of the foremost pioneer in modern architecture, Frank Lloyd Wright offers a fascinating biographical chronicle that reveals the principles and relationships at the base of Wright’s production.