Food and Drink in American History

It has been followed by a score of additional books and hundreds of articles that have examined different aspects of the history of American foods and beverages. In the autumn of 1995, I began teaching culinary history at the New School ...

Food and Drink in American History

This three-volume encyclopedia on the history of American food and beverages covers topics ranging from early American Indian foods to mandatory nutrition information at fast food restaurants.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

These food and beverage museums or collections are only a small number of the total existing throughout the United ... National Museum of American History, Washington, DC 202-633-1000 http://www.americanhistory.si.edu Food-related ...

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America

The second edition of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, originally published in September 2004, covers the significant events, inventions, and social movements that have shaped the way Americans view, prepare, and consume food and drink. Entries range across historical periods and the trends that characterize them. The thoroughly updated new edition captures the shifting American perspective on food and is the most authoritative and the most current reference work on American cuisine.

The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink

These food and beverage museums or collections are only a small number of the total existing throughout the United ... www.americanhistory.si.edu Food-related objects are on view in almost every exhibition: agricultural implements from ...

The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink

Offering a panoramic view of the history and culture of food and drink in America with fascinating entries on everything from the smell of asparagus to the history of White Castle, and the origin of Bloody Marys to jambalaya, the Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink provides a concise, authoritative, and exuberant look at this modern American obsession. Ideal for the food scholar and food enthusiast alike, it is equally appetizing for anyone fascinated by Americana, capturing our culture and history through what we love most--food! Building on the highly praised and deliciously browseable two-volume compendium the Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, this new work serves up everything you could ever want to know about American consumables and their impact on popular culture and the culinary world. Within its pages for example, we learn that Lifesavers candy owes its success to the canny marketing idea of placing the original flavor, mint, next to cash registers at bars. Patrons who bought them to mask the smell of alcohol on their breath before heading home soon found they were just as tasty sober and the company began producing other flavors. Edited by Andrew Smith, a writer and lecturer on culinary history, the Companion serves up more than just trivia however, including hundreds of entries on fast food, celebrity chefs, fish, sandwiches, regional and ethnic cuisine, food science, and historical food traditions. It also dispels a few commonly held myths. Veganism, isn't simply the practice of a few "hippies," but is in fact wide-spread among elite athletic circles. Many of the top competitors in the Ironman and Ultramarathon events go even further, avoiding all animal products by following a strictly vegan diet. Anyone hungering to know what our nation has been cooking and eating for the last three centuries should own the Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink.

Food and Drink in American History

This three-volume encyclopedia on the history of American food and beverages serves as an ideal companion resource for social studies and American history courses, covering topics ranging from early American Indian foods to mandatory ...

Food and Drink in American History

This three-volume encyclopedia on the history of American food and beverages serves as an ideal companion resource for social studies and American history courses, covering topics ranging from early American Indian foods to mandatory nutrition information at fast food restaurants.

Road Sides

Smith , Andrew F. Peanuts : The Illustrious History of the Goober Pea . ... The Journal of American History , Vol . 83 , No. 4 ( March 1997 ) : 1282-1308 ... In Food and Drink in American History : A “ Full Course ” Encyclopedia , vol .

Road Sides

An illustrated glovebox essential, Road Sides explores the fundamentals of a well-fed road trip through the American South, from A to Z. There are detours and destinations, accompanied by detailed histories and more than one hundred original illustrations that document how we get where we’re going and what to eat and do along the way.Learn the backstory of food-shaped buildings, including the folks behind Hills of Snow, a giant snow cone stand in Smithfield, North Carolina, that resembles the icy treats it sells. Find out how kudzu was used to support a burgeoning highway system, and get to know Edith Edwards—the self-proclaimed Kudzu Queen—who turns the obnoxious vine into delicious teas and jellies. Discover the roots of kitschy roadside attractions, and have lunch with the state-employed mermaids of Weeki Wachee Springs in Florida.Road Sides is for everyone—the driver in search of supper or superlatives (the biggest, best, and even worst), the person who cannot resist a local plaque or snack and pulls over for every historical marker and road stand, and the kid who just wants to gawk at a peach-shaped water tower.

We Did What Offensive and Inappropriate Behavior in American History

Timothy B. Jay See also: Blue Laws, Sundays, and Sundaes; Illegal Drugs; Organized Crime; Overstimulation by Food and Drink Further Reading Flexner, S.B. (1976). I hear America talking. New York: Van Nostrand. Flexner, S.B. (1982).

We Did What   Offensive and Inappropriate Behavior in American History

This provocative guide profiles behaviors considered shocking throughout American history, revealing the extent of changing social mores and cultural perceptions of appropriate conduct since the Colonial period. • Identifies how social values have changed in American history • Provides comprehensive coverage of American society from Colonial America to present day • Reveals the fascinating—and controversial—backstories behind some of America's favorite brands • Examines more than 150 topics on behaviors once deemed "offensive" or "inappropriate," including birth control, dirty dancing, obscene literature and music lyrics, pornography, and prostitution

Manly Meals and Mom s Home Cooking

On cooking columns in newspapers, see Hooker, Food and Drink in America, 215. ... see Alice Ross, ''Ella Smith's Unfinished Community Cookbook: A Social History of Women and Work in Smithtown, New York, 1884–1922,'' in Recipes for ...

Manly Meals and Mom s Home Cooking

From the first edition of The Fannie Farmer Cookbook to the latest works by today's celebrity chefs, cookbooks reflect more than just passing culinary fads. As historical artifacts, they offer a unique perspective on the cultures that produced them. In Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking, Jessamyn Neuhaus offers a perceptive and piquant analysis of the tone and content of American cookbooks published between the 1790s and the 1960s, adroitly uncovering the cultural assumptions and anxieties—particularly about women and domesticity—they contain. Neuhaus's in-depth survey of these cookbooks questions the supposedly straightforward lessons about food preparation they imparted. While she finds that cookbooks aimed to make readers—mainly white, middle-class women—into effective, modern-age homemakers who saw joy, not drudgery, in their domestic tasks, she notes that the phenomenal popularity of Peg Bracken's 1960 cookbook, The I Hate to Cook Book, attests to the limitations of this kind of indoctrination. At the same time, she explores the proliferation of bachelor cookbooks aimed at "the man in the kitchen" and the biases they display about male and female abilities, tastes, and responsibilities. Neuhaus also addresses the impact of World War II rationing on homefront cuisine; the introduction of new culinary technologies, gourmet sensibilities, and ethnic foods into American kitchens; and developments in the cookbook industry since the 1960s. More than a history of the cookbook, Manly Meals and Mom's Home Cooking provides an absorbing and enlightening account of gender and food in modern America.

Food in Time and Place

The American Historical Association Companion to Food History Paul Freedman, Joyce E. Chaplin, Ken Albala. University Press, 2006); Paula Lee ... In Food, Drink and Identity: Cooking, Eating and Drinking in Europe Since the Middle Ages, ...

Food in Time and Place

Food and cuisine are important subjects for historians across many areas of study. Food, after all, is one of the most basic human needs and a foundational part of social and cultural histories. Such topics as famines, food supply, nutrition, and public health are addressed by historians specializing in every era and every nation. Food in Time and Place delivers an unprecedented review of the state of historical research on food, endorsed by the American Historical Association, providing readers with a geographically, chronologically, and topically broad understanding of food cultures—from ancient Mediterranean and medieval societies to France and its domination of haute cuisine. Teachers, students, and scholars in food history will appreciate coverage of different thematic concerns, such as transfers of crops, conquest, colonization, immigration, and modern forms of globalization.

The Routledge History of Rural America

American history is agricultural history even if professors and students do not realize it. ... It is incumbent on history professors to illuminate for students how modern Americans consume food and drink but do not think ...

The Routledge History of Rural America

First published in 2014. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Three Squares

History Cookbook, 44–45; Alice Ross, “Doughnuts,” in Smith, The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America, 1:408–409; ... On the Erie Canal and the rise of Midwestern grain production, see Smith, Eating History, 13–17.

Three Squares

We are what we eat, as the saying goes, but we are also how we eat, and when, and where. Our eating habits reveal as much about our society as the food on our plates, and our national identity is written in the eating schedules we follow and the customs we observe at the table and on the go. In Three Squares, food historian Abigail Carroll upends the popular understanding of our most cherished mealtime traditions, revealing that our eating habits have never been stable -- far from it, in fact. The eating patterns and ideals we've inherited are relatively recent inventions, the products of complex social and economic forces, as well as the efforts of ambitious inventors, scientists and health gurus. Whether we're pouring ourselves a bowl of cereal, grabbing a quick sandwich, or congregating for a family dinner, our mealtime habits are living artifacts of our collective history -- and represent only the latest stage in the evolution of the American meal. Our early meals, Carroll explains, were rustic affairs, often eaten hastily, without utensils, and standing up. Only in the nineteenth century, when the Industrial Revolution upset work schedules and drastically reduced the amount of time Americans could spend on the midday meal, did the shape of our modern "three squares" emerge: quick, simple, and cold breakfasts and lunches and larger, sit-down dinners. Since evening was the only part of the day when families could come together, dinner became a ritual -- as American as apple pie. But with the rise of processed foods, snacking has become faster, cheaper, and easier than ever, and many fear for the fate of the cherished family meal as a result. The story of how the simple gruel of our forefathers gave way to snack fixes and fast food, Three Squares also explains how Americans' eating habits may change in the years to come. Only by understanding the history of the American meal can we can help determine its future.

Daily Life in the Industrial United States 1870 1900 2nd Edition

The Reader's Companion to American History. Houghton Mifflin Company, 1991. Goodwin, Lorine Swainston. The Pure Food, Drink, and Drug Crusaders, 1879–1914. McFarland & Co., 1999. Green, Harvey. The Light of the Home: An Intimate View of ...

Daily Life in the Industrial United States  1870 1900  2nd Edition

Not just about the rise of the factories or the emergence of the modern city, this fascinating history conveys how it felt to work the assembly line and walk the bustling urban streets. • Provides an overview of the dramatic economic changes occurring in the United States during industrialization, especially in the textile, meatpacking, steel, and railroad industries • Describes a political culture marked by high participation rates in the North, active suppression of the African American vote in the South, and a youth culture that made voting an important male rite of passage • Offers primary documents that invite readers to consider contrasting positions on a variety of issues, including how white supremacists justified violence and suppression of the black vote and how African American activists spoke out to resist this • Explores a variety of educational models, including manual education, Montessori education, and single-sex education, that resonate with contemporary debates on education

Reader s Guide to American History

With the activist role of Hillary Rodham Clinton during the mid-19905, interest in the historical contributions of presidential ... demonstrated in Robert Forster and Orest Ranum's translated anthology Food and Drink in History (1979).

Reader s Guide to American History

There are so many books on so many aspects of the history of the United States, offering such a wide variety of interpretations, that students, teachers, scholars, and librarians often need help and advice on how to find what they want. The Reader's Guide to American History is designed to meet that need by adopting a new and constructive approach to the appreciation of this rich historiography. Each of the 600 entries on topics in political, social and economic history describes and evaluates some 6 to 12 books on the topic, providing guidance to the reader on everything from broad surveys and interpretive works to specialized monographs. The entries are devoted to events and individuals, as well as broader themes, and are written by a team of well over 200 contributors, all scholars of American history.

The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink

Ideal for the food scholar and food enthusiast alike, it is equally appetizing for anyone fascinated by Americana, capturing our culture and history through what we love most--food!Building on the highly praised and deliciously browseable ...

The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink

A panoramic history of the culinary traditions, culture, and evolution of American food and drink features nearly one thousand entries, essays, and articles on such topics as fast food, celebrity chefs, regional and ethnic cuisine, social and cultural food history, food science, and more, along with hundreds of photographs and lists of food museums, Web sites, festivals, and organizations.

Artifacts from Modern America

More apt is the concept of an “American style” of food that borrowed, improvised, and changed traditional foodways into a nearly ... America Eats Out: An Illustrated History of Restaurants, Taverns, Coffee Shops, Speakeasies, ...

Artifacts from Modern America

This intriguing book examines how material objects of the 20th century—ranging from articles of clothing to tools and weapons, communication devices, and toys and games—reflect dominant ideas and testify to the ways social change happens. • Supplies numerous examples of the ways in which American innovation depended on immigrants who invented new technologies and contributed immeasurably towards a uniquely powerful American economy • Demonstrates how American material life was created through globalization, from products imported into this country, such as Atari's video game console, to American products dependent upon imported materials, such as American cigarettes that used imported tobacco, and the coffee percolator on the kitchen table, serving up imported brewed coffee beans • Highlights how the ongoing struggle to achieve true equality and democracy is evidenced through objects such as a voting machine from 1900, the bus that Rosa Parks boarded, the buttons worn by gay rights activists, and the robe Muhammad Ali, a converted Muslim American, fought in—material items that played a role in the ongoing project of American political life

The Joy of Eating A Guide to Food in Modern Pop Culture

STARTERS Food museums in the U.S. catalog and extol the virtues of foods and beverages. These museums range from small organizations highlighting single ingredients to large-scale, elaborate exhibits documenting the history of a type of ...

The Joy of Eating  A Guide to Food in Modern Pop Culture

In 1961, Julia Child introduced the American public to an entirely new, joy-infused approach to cooking and eating food. In doing so, she set in motion a food renaissance that is still in full bloom today. Over the last six decades, food has become an increasingly more diverse, prominent, and joyful point of cultural interest. The Joy of Eating discusses in detail the current golden age of food in contemporary American popular culture. Entries explore the proliferation of food-themed television shows, documentaries, and networks; the booming popularity of celebrity chefs; unusual, exotic, decadent, creative, and even mundane food trends; and cultural celebrations of food, such as in festivals and music. The volume provides depth and academic gravity by tying each entry into broader themes and larger contexts (in relation to a food-themed reality show, for example, discussing the show's popularity in direct relation to a significant economic event), providing a brief history behind popular foods and types of cuisines and tracing the evolution of our understanding of diet and nutrition, among other explications.

Cuisine and Empire

The Englishman's Food: A History of Five Centuries of English Diet. London: Jonathan Cape, 1939. ... Dunn, Richard S., and Institute of Early American History and Culture. ... Nature's Perfect Food: How Milk Became America's Drink.

Cuisine and Empire

Rachel Laudan tells the remarkable story of the rise and fall of the world’s great cuisines—from the mastery of grain cooking some twenty thousand years ago, to the present—in this superbly researched book. Probing beneath the apparent confusion of dozens of cuisines to reveal the underlying simplicity of the culinary family tree, she shows how periodic seismic shifts in “culinary philosophy”—beliefs about health, the economy, politics, society and the gods—prompted the construction of new cuisines, a handful of which, chosen as the cuisines of empires, came to dominate the globe. Cuisine and Empire shows how merchants, missionaries, and the military took cuisines over mountains, oceans, deserts, and across political frontiers. Laudan’s innovative narrative treats cuisine, like language, clothing, or architecture, as something constructed by humans. By emphasizing how cooking turns farm products into food and by taking the globe rather than the nation as the stage, she challenges the agrarian, romantic, and nationalistic myths that underlie the contemporary food movement.

Revenue and Highway Program

These early Americans of New England and New Amsterdam brought with them a culture which treated beer and ale as both beverages and food - a view nutritionists take today . The most famous of all brewers in early American history was ...

Revenue and Highway Program


Travels Through American History in the Mid Atlantic

Her unsuccessful 1648 attempt to vote, doomed by the era in which she lived, endures as the first suffrage attempt in America by a woman. Farthing's Ordinary, once an inn that provided food, drink, and lodging for travelers with ...

Travels Through American History in the Mid Atlantic

"Few regions of the United States have so many historically significant sites as the mid-Atlantic. [This] brings to life sixteen easily accessible historical destinations in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Washington D.C., the Potomac Valley and Virginia ... Each attraction, reenactment and interactive exhiobit in the book is described through the lens of the American experience ... Excerpts from eyewitness accounts further humanize key moments ... This ... will appeal to visiting tourists, area residents seeking weekend diversions, history buffs and armchair travelers"--Publisher's description.

Constructive Drinking

In emphasizing the meal as an occasion of social relationships , the bourgoisie deny the primary , material ... Political conflicts over the use and availability of alcoholic beverages have been a persistent part of American history .

Constructive Drinking

First published in 1987, Constructive Drinking studies the functions drinking plays within society. A series of original case studies deal with a variety of exotic - not just alcohol - from a variety of cultural and geographical contexts.