Forest Bathing Retreat

Find Wholeness in the Company of Trees

Forest Bathing Retreat

People have been retreating to the woods for quiet, meditation, and inspiration for centuries, and recent research finds that time spent in the forest doesn’t just feel good but is, in fact, good for you. Inspired by the Japanese concept of shinrin-yoku, or forest bathing, poet Hannah Fries invites readers to bask in the company of trees, whether in a city park or a rural nature preserve. Fries combines her own reflections and guided mindfulness exercises with a curated selection of inspirational writing from poets, naturalists, artists, scientists, and thinkers throughout the centuries and across cultures, including Japanese haiku masters, 19th century European Romantics, American Transcendentalists, and contemporary environmentalists. Accompanied by beautiful forest photography, Forest Bathing Retreat is a distinctive gift that invites frequent revisiting for fresh insights and inspiration. This publication conforms to the EPUB Accessibility specification at WCAG 2.0 Level AA.

Forest Bathing: Living and Healing

A Photo Journal

Forest Bathing: Living and Healing

Nature is a surprise package that provides solitude and energy for living and healing. We all need our share of vitamin G, or green therapy, as often as we can. A walk in the forest can energize our spirits, minds, and bodies and improve our well-being by helping us to feel less stressed and happier. In a beautiful photo journal, photographer Patricia Ahearn and writer Lisa Zschuschen combine talents to introduce others to the world of forest bathing, a Japanese-based concept that promises its followers relaxation, whole-body health benefits, and a renewed sense of purpose, simply by walking in the woods. In their own words, Ahearn and Zschuschen explain what forest bathing has meant for them, their family, and their health and include commentary from residents, medical doctors, and wellness professionals. Ahearn’s photographs showcase local natural beauty and highlight nature in its most pristine form. Forest Bathing: Living and Healing, A Photo Journal invites others to experience the power of nature through a virtual walk in the woods guided by inspirational writings and captivating photographs.

Forest Bathing

The Rejuvenating Practice of Shinrin Yoku

Forest Bathing

Shinrin Yoku: "taking in the forest atmosphere," the medicine of simply being in the forest, "forest bathing." From the healing properties of phytoncides (self-protective compounds emitted by plants) to the ways we can benefit from what forest spaces can teach us, Forest Bathing: The Rejuvenating Practice of Shinrin Yoku discusses the history, science and philosophy behind this age-old therapeutic practice. Examples from the ancient Celts to Henry David Thoreau remind us of the ties between humankind and the natural world—ties that have become more and more elusive to Westerners. This book explains the traditional Japanese concepts that help readers understand and share in the benefits of the Japanese approach to forest bathing—a cornerstone of healing and health care in Japan. These concepts include: Yugen: Our living experience of the world around us that is so profound as to be beyond expression Komorebi: The interplay of leaves and sunlight Wabi sabi: Rejoicing in imperfection and impermanence The book goes on to offer guidelines for finding our replenishment in these peaceful, isolated spaces—from turning off the phone (or leaving it at home) to seeking the irregularities in nature, which in turn can make us less critical of ourselves. Finally, it offers tips not only on being fully present and mindful while you're in the forest, but also on how to take that mindfulness home with you—even if that home is the busiest and most crowded of cities.

Forest Bathing

Discovering Health and Happiness Through the Japanese Practice of Shinrin Yoku (A Start Here Guide)

Forest Bathing

Author and naturopathic physician Dr. Cyndi Gilbert introduces readers to the art and science of forest bathing, the deceptively simple Japanese practice of spending time in the forest as a way to find peace, rejuvenation, and to promote health. Dr. Gilbert shares her own personal history with the practice—how in the midst of an urban sprawl she lost touch with nature, only to rediscover it through the Japanese practice of Shinrin Yoku or forest bathing. In Forest Bathing, you'll discover the health benefits of Shinrin Yoku, from restoring Vitamin D to balancing your microbiome, along with the rich mental and emotional rewards that spending time surrounded by trees can offer. Forest bathing is a restorative, meditative activity for those who practice it by themselves, but Dr. Gilbert also explores the benefits of practicing forest bathing in community with family and friends. Most importantly, the book offers an easy and practical guide to begin your own forest bathing practice along with a resources section to help you further explore the topic. Learn to tap more deeply into your five senses, practice true mindfulness in sacred woodland spaces, and experience the healing impact of nature wherever you are. Other books in the Start Here Guide Series: Energy Healing: Simple and Effective Practices to Become Your Own Healer Meditation: The Simple and Practical Way to Begin Meditating Chakras: An Introduction to Using the Chakras for Emotional, Physical, and Spiritual Well-Being

Tree Wisdom

A Year of Healing Among the Trees

Tree Wisdom

Twelve lessons that trees can teach us to achieve inner calm, with mindfulness and journaling exercises. Forest bathing, tree hugging, 'earthing' and nature retreats--more and more, we are craving a return to nature, to peace, and simplicity. This book shows the way. When international opera tenor and forester Vincent Karche lost his voice, he was instructed by a shamanic healer that, to regain it, he would have to find himself again first. Thus began a journey into the heart of the forest. In this book, Vincent mirrors the cyclical nature of the seasons to help us reconnect to our natural rhythm, find inner peace, and activate physical and emotional healing. Just as a tree anchors its roots into the earth to weather storms, so too can we learn to cultivate resilience; to find instant relief from stress, we need only breathe slowly in and out as a tree would; and we can forge stronger relationships by encouraging symbiotic links with all beings, giving and taking only what we need as trees and plants do. In this poetic exploration of the unbreakable bond between nature and human, Vincent reminds us that we are both the forest and the tree: each unique in our being and yet part of a Divine natural creation.

Druids Foundling

Druids Foundling

A young girl is found by the druid, Halwn, holding the head of her dead mother. She grows up despising violence af any kind but is later to be cast into the role of a warrior after the invasion by Roman soldiers. Halwn must also battle against his spiritual beliefs as he sadly watches the changes in his foundling. Together they find within the depths of their souls strength and courage that neither knew they possessed as their destinies unfold. To some this will be a work of fiction. To others reality. And yet to others a little of both.

Moving Mountains

Moving Mountains

One of the most enduring images of the Ethiopian famine that shocked the world in 1984 was that of the young International Red Cross nurse who, surrounded by thousands of starving people and with limited supplies, had the terrible task of choosing which children to feed, knowing that those she turned away might not last the night. That nurse was Claire Bertschinger, and those pictures inspired Live Aid, the biggest relief programme the world had ever seen. 'In her was vested the power of life and death,' Bob Geldof said. 'She had become God-like, and that is unbearable for anyone.' Michael Buerk, whose BBC documentary first showed those pictures, persuaded Claire to return to Ethiopia almost twenty years later. For all those years she had been haunted by the terrible choices she had been forced to make. But when she met them again, the survivors welcomed her back with open arms. Born in Essex, Claire Bertschinger had to overcome dyslexia to qualify as a nurse. When she joined the International Red Cross, she fulfilled a zest for adventure and a passionate vocation for relief work. She has worked with the war-wounded and hostages in Lebanon, with the Mujahidin in Afghanistan, and with victims of civil war and displaced persons in Uganda, Sierra Leone and the Sudan. Working in war zones she often came under fire herself while trying to save the lives of others.