Freedom and Anthropology in Kant s Moral Philosophy

Neokantian moral theorists have recently begun to pay more attention to Kant's moral anthropology. Robert Louden devotes the longest chapter of Kant's Impure Ethics (Louden 2000, cf. Louden 1986) to the treatment of the role of ...

Freedom and Anthropology in Kant s Moral Philosophy

A comprehensive account of Kant's theory of freedom and his moral anthropology.

Kant Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View

169–174 ; Roger Sullivan , “ The Influence of Kant's Anthropology on his Moral Theory ... 2001 ) , Patrick R. Frierson , Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy ( Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , 2003 ) , and most ...

Kant  Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View

This volume offers a translation of Kant's pioneering contribution to the discipline of anthropology.

Kant s Conception of Moral Character

The first book to focus on character formation in Kant's moral philosophy, it builds on important recent work on Kant's aesthetics and anthropology, and brings these to bear on moral issues.

Kant s Conception of Moral Character

Currently fashionable among critics of enlightenment thought is the charge that Kant's ethics fails to provide an adequate account of character and its formation in moral and political life. G. Felicitas Munzel challenges this reading of Kant's thought, claiming not only that Kant has a very rich notion of moral character, but also that it is a conception of systematic importance for his thought, linking the formal moral with the critical, aesthetic, anthropological, and biological aspects of his philosophy. The first book to focus on character formation in Kant's moral philosophy, it builds on important recent work on Kant's aesthetics and anthropology, and brings these to bear on moral issues. Munzel traces Kant's multifaceted definition of character through the broad range of his writings, and then explores the structure of character, its actual exercise in the world, and its cultivation. An outstanding work of original textual analysis and interpretation, Kant's Conception of Moral Character is a major contribution to Kant studies and moral philosophy in general.

The Palgrave Kant Handbook

In Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy,14 I addressed the problem of how empirical influences on moral development could be taken seriously within pragmatic anthropology given that human beings are always free to act ...

The Palgrave Kant Handbook

This remarkably comprehensive Handbook provides a multifaceted yet carefully crafted investigation into the work of Immanuel Kant, one of the greatest philosophers the world has ever seen. With original contributions from leading international scholars in the field, this authoritative volume first sets Kant’s work in its biographical and historical context. It then proceeds to explain and evaluate his revolutionary work in metaphysics and epistemology, logic, ethics, aesthetics, philosophy of science, philosophy of religion, political philosophy, philosophy of history, philosophy of education, and anthropology. Key Features: • Draws attention to the foundations of Kant’s varied philosophical insights — transcendental idealism, logic, and the bridge between theoretical and practical reason • Considers hitherto neglected topics such as sexuality and the philosophy of education • Explores the immense impact of his ground-breaking work on subsequent intellectual movements Serving as a touchstone for meaningful discussion about Kant’s philosophical and historical importance, this definitive Handbook is essential reading for Kant scholars who want to keep abreast of the field and for advanced students wishing to explore the frontiers of the subject.

Community and Progress in Kant s Moral Philosophy

Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Grenberg, Jeanine M. “Social Dimensions of Kant's Conception of Radical Evil.” In Kant's Anatomy of Evil, edited by Sharon Anderson-Gold and ...

Community and Progress in Kant s Moral Philosophy

The text draws on a wide range of Immanuel Kant's writings, including his texts on moral and political philosophy and his lectures on ethics, pedagogy, and anthropology. Though the book is grounded in an analysis of Kant's writing, it also puts forward the novel claim that Kant's theory is centrally concerned with the relationships we have in our day-to-day lives.

Kant Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View

Paul Guyer's investigation of the relationship between anthropology and aesthetics, “Beauty, Freedom, and Morality: Kant's Lectures on Anthropology and the Development of his Aesthetic Theory,” in Essays on Kant's Anthropology, pp.

Kant  Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View

Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View essentially reflects the last lectures Kant gave for his annual course in anthropology, which he taught from 1772 until his retirement in 1796. The lectures were published in 1798, with the largest first printing of any of Kant's works. Intended for a broad audience, they reveal not only Kant's unique contribution to the newly emerging discipline of anthropology, but also his desire to offer students a practical view of the world and of humanity's place in it. With its focus on what the human being 'as a free-acting being makes of himself or can and should make of himself,' the Anthropology also offers readers an application of some central elements of Kant's philosophy. This volume offers an annotated translation of the text by Robert B. Louden, together with an introduction by Manfred Kuehn that explores the context and themes of the lectures.

Naturalism and Realism in Kant s Ethics

Harvard University Press. Friedman, Michael. 1997. “Philosophical Naturalism.” Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 71: 5–21. Frierson, Patrick. 2003. Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral ...

Naturalism and Realism in Kant s Ethics


God and the Self in Hegel

For a comprehensive account of the debate, as well as an in-depth analysis of Kant's notion of grace, ... Patrick R. Frierson, Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), 122. 10.

God and the Self in Hegel

Argues that Hegel’s conception of God and the self holds the key to overcoming subjectivism in both philosophy of religion and metaphysics. God and the Self in Hegel proposes a reconstruction of Hegel’s conception of God and analyzes the significance of this reading for Hegel’s idealistic metaphysics. Paolo Diego Bubbio argues that in Hegel’s view, subjectivism—the tenet that there is no underlying “true” reality that exists independently of the activity of the cognitive agent—can be avoided, and content can be restored to religion, only to the extent that God is understood in God’s relation to human beings, and human beings are understood in their relation to God. Focusing on traditional problems in theology and the philosophy of religion, such as the ontological argument for the existence of God, the Trinity, and the “death of God,” Bubbio shows the relevance of Hegel’s view of religion and God for his broader philosophical strategy. In this account, as a response to the fundamental Kantian challenge of how to conceive the mind-world relation without setting mind over and against the world, Hegel has found a way of overcoming subjectivism in both philosophy and religion.

Kant s Justification of Ethics

Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy . Cambridge : Cambridge University Press . Frierson , Patrick . 2005. ' Kant's Empirical Account of Action . Philosophers ' Imprint 5 ( 7 ) : 1–34 . Frierson , Patrick . 2014. Kant's ...

Kant s Justification of Ethics

Kant's arguments for the reality of human freedom and the normativity of the moral law continue to inspire work in contemporary moral philosophy. Many prominent ethicists invoke Kant, directly or indirectly, in their efforts to derive the authority of moral requirements from a more basic conception of action, agency, or rationality. But many commentators have detected a deep rift between the Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals and the Critique of Practical Reason, leaving Kant's project of justification exposed to conflicting assessments and interpretations. In this ground-breaking study of Kant, Owen Ware defends the controversial view that Kant's mature writings on ethics share a unified commitment to the moral law's primacy. Using both close analysis and historical contextualization, Owen Ware overturns a paradigmatic way of reading Kant's arguments for morality and freedom, situating them within Kant's critical methodology at large. The result is a novel understanding of Kant that challenges much of what goes under the banner of Kantian arguments for moral normativity today.

Kant Liberalism and the Meaning of Life

Kant's Empirical Psychology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Frierson, Patrick R. 2013. What Is the Human Being? New York, NY: Routledge. Frierson, Patrick R. 2003, Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy.

Kant  Liberalism  and the Meaning of Life

"This book is the first extended treatment of Kant's understanding of the meaning of life. It focuses on his largely neglected early lectures on anthropology from the 1760s and 1770s in the crucial years leading up to his Critique of Pure Reason. These lectures feature Kant at his least metaphysical, abstract, and legalistic. Instead, in these lectures, Kant adopts a naturalistic perspective, examining the purpose of the human being as an embodied, needy creature. In this book, Church argues that for the early Kant, human nature has two conflicting ends-that of wholeness and perfection-a conflict that justifies humanity in giving itself its own moral purpose to bring harmony to our nature and meaning to our lives. Church then argues that Kant's early view of the meaning of life has important implications for understanding his political theory. Kantian liberalism has in recent years been virtually synonymous with John Rawls' liberalism, which has been criticized for abstracting from concerns about meaning in life and from debate and contestation in democratic politics. This book argues that Kant's liberalism involves a more dynamic and contestatory politics than Rawls' liberalism, because of the tensions in our nature as revealed by Kant's anthropology. In addition, Kant's anthropology points to a perfectionist dimension in Kantian liberalism, that politics on Kant's view is not only a framework for pursuing our own view of the good, but also a partnership that fosters a meaningful life"--

What is the Human Being

Grenberg situates Kant's theory of evil in the broader context of an ethics of “humility.” Michaelson discusses evil in relation to philosophy of religion. Frierson relates evil to Kant's anthropology and theory of freedom.

What is the Human Being

Philosophers, anthropologists and biologists have long puzzled over the question of human nature. It is also a question that Kant thought about deeply and returned to in many of his writings. In this lucid and wide-ranging introduction to Kant’s philosophy of human nature - which is essential for understanding his thought as a whole - Patrick R. Frierson assesses Kant’s theories and examines his critics. He begins by explaining how Kant articulates three ways of addressing the question ‘what is the human being?’: the transcendental, the empirical, and the pragmatic. He then considers some of the great theorists of human nature who wrestle with Kant’s views, such as Hegel, Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche, and Freud; contemporary thinkers such as E.O.Wilson and Daniel Dennett, who have sought biological explanations of human nature; Thomas Kuhn, Michel Foucault, and Clifford Geertz, who emphasize the diversity of human beings in different times and places; and existentialist philosophers such as Sartre and Heidegger. He argues that whilst these approaches challenge and enrich Kant’s views in significant ways, all suffer from serious weaknesses that Kant’s anthropology can address. Taking a core insight of Kant’s - that human beings are fundamentally free but finite - he argues that it is the existentialists, particularly Sartre, who are the most direct heirs of his transcendental anthropology. The final part of the book is an extremely helpful overview of the work of contemporary philosophers, particularly Christine Korsgaard and Jürgen Habermas. Patrick R. Frierson explains how these philosophers engage with questions of naturalism, historicism, and existentialism while developing Kantian conceptions of the human being. Including chapter summaries and annotated further reading, What is the Human Being? is an outstanding introduction to some fundamental aspects of Kant’s thought and a judicious assessment of leading theories of human nature. It is essential reading for all students of Kant and the philosophy of human nature, as well as those in related disciplines such as anthropology, politics and sociology.

Kant on Evil Self Deception and Moral Reform

We see this most strikingly in a brief remark about servility at MS 6:466, where Kant notes that the arrogant person, ... 296–298 and 314–317; and Frierson's own Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy, 95–104.

Kant on Evil  Self Deception  and Moral Reform

Throughout his writings, and particularly in Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason, Kant alludes to the idea that evil is connected to self-deceit, and while numerous commentators regard this as a highly attractive thesis, none have seriously explored it. Laura Papish's Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform addresses this crucial element of Kant's ethical theory. Working with both Kant's core texts on ethics and materials less often cited within scholarship on Kant's practical philosophy (such as Kant's logic lectures), Papish explores the cognitive dimensions of Kant's accounts of evil and moral reform while engaging the most influential -- and often scathing -- of Kant's critics. Her book asks what self-deception is for Kant, why and how it is connected to evil, and how we achieve the self-knowledge that should take the place of self-deceit. She offers novel defenses of Kant's widely dismissed claims that evil is motivated by self-love and that an evil is rooted universally in human nature, and she develops original arguments concerning how social institutions and interpersonal relationships facilitate, for Kant, the self-knowledge that is essential to moral reform. In developing and defending Kant's understanding of evil, moral reform, and their cognitive underpinnings, Papish not only makes an important contribution to Kant scholarship. Kant on Evil, Self-Deception, and Moral Reform also reveals how much contemporary moral philosophers, philosophers of religion, and general readers interested in the phenomenon of evil stand to gain by taking seriously Kant's views.

Kant s Anatomy of Evil

P., Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy (Cambridge University Press, 2003). “The Moral Importance of Politeness in Kant's Anthropology,” Kantian Review, 9 (2005). “Review: Richard Dean, Kant and the Value of Humanity,” ...

Kant s Anatomy of Evil

Kant infamously claimed that all human beings, without exception, are evil by nature. This collection of essays critically examines and elucidates what he must have meant by this indictment. It shows the role which evil plays in his overall philosophical project and analyses its relation to individual autonomy. Furthermore, it explores the relevance of Kant's views for understanding contemporary questions such as crimes against humanity and moral reconstruction. Leading scholars in the field engage a wide range of sources from which a distinctly Kantian theory of evil emerges, both subtle and robust, and capable of shedding light on the complex dynamics of human immorality.

Engaging with Rousseau

... especially in relation to his moral philosophy? How can the determinism of anthropology, as expressed in human physiology, character, sex, and race, be matched with Kant's case for human freedom as spontaneity and selfdetermination?

Engaging with Rousseau

An examination of responses to Jean-Jacques Rousseau's works and self-fashioned image from the Enlightenment onwards across Europe and the Americas.

The Bloomsbury Companion to Kant

Kant's Metaphysics of Morals: Interpretative Essays (Oxford: Oxford university Press, 2002) and L. denis (ed.) ... Frierson, Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy (Cambridge: Cambridge university Press, 2003) and J. H. ...

The Bloomsbury Companion to Kant

Immanuel Kant is widely considered to be the most important and influential thinker of modern Europe and the late Enlightenment. His philosophy is extraordinarily wide-ranging and his influence has been pervasive throughout eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth-century thought, in particular in the work of the German Idealists, and also in both Analytic and Continental philosophy today. Now available as a new and expanded edition in paperback, this accessible companion to Kant features more than 100 specially commissioned entries, written by a team of experts in the field, covering every aspect of his philosophy. The Bloomsbury Companion to Kant presents a comprehensive overview of the historical and philosophical context in which Kant wrote and the various features, themes and topics apparent in his thought. It also includes extensive synopses of all his major published works and a survey of the key lines of reception and influence including a new addition on Schopenhauer's reception of Kant. It concludes with a thorough bibliography of English language secondary literature, now expanded for this edition to include all cutting-edge publications in the area. This is an essential and practical research tool for those working in the field of eighteenth-century German philosophy and Kant.

Kant s Philosophy and the Momentum of Modernity

others as the source of the moral law. Kant rejects moral interdependence deep down the same way that Rousseau does. ... So there really is no conflict at all between Kant's anthropology and his moral philosophy of freedom.

Kant   s Philosophy and the Momentum of Modernity

This book is a careful study of both Immanuel Kant’s work and the context of that work in Early Modern Philosophy. Roecklein's chief concern is the philosophy of perception, which is manifest in Kant’s doctrines of the transcendental aesthetic and the concept of phenomena.

Kant s Human Being

Frankena, William K. Three Historical Philosophies of Education: Aristotle, Kant, Dewey. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman, 1965. Frierson, Patrick R. Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy. New York: Cambridge University Press ...

Kant s Human Being

In Kant's Human Being, Robert B. Louden continues and deepens avenues of research first initiated in his highly acclaimed book, Kant's Impure Ethics. Drawing on a wide variety of both published and unpublished works spanning all periods of Kant's extensive writing career, Louden here focuses on Kant's under-appreciated empirical work on human nature, with particular attention to the connections between this body of work and his much-discussed ethical theory. Kant repeatedly claimed that the question, "What is the human being" is philosophy's most fundamental question, one that encompasses all others. Louden analyzes and evaluates Kant's own answer to his question, showing how it differs from other accounts of human nature. This collection of twelve essays is divided into three parts. In Part One (Human Virtues), Louden explores the nature and role of virtue in Kant's ethical theory, showing how the conception of human nature behind Kant's virtue theory results in a virtue ethics that is decidedly different from more familiar Aristotelian virtue ethics programs. In Part Two (Ethics and Anthropology), he uncovers the dominant moral message in Kant's anthropological investigations, drawing new connections between Kant's work on human nature and his ethics. Finally, in Part Three (Extensions of Anthropology), Louden explores specific aspects of Kant's theory of human nature developed outside of his anthropology lectures, in his works on religion, geography, education ,and aesthetics, and shows how these writings substantially amplify his account of human beings. Kant's Human Being offers a detailed and multifaceted investigation of the question that Kant held to be the most important of all, and will be of interest not only to philosophers but also to all who are concerned with the study of human nature.

Kant Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime and Other Writings

This volume collects Kant's most important ethical and anthropological writings from the 1760s, before he developed his critical philosophy.

Kant  Observations on the Feeling of the Beautiful and Sublime and Other Writings

This volume collects Kant's most important ethical and anthropological writings from the 1760s, before he developed his critical philosophy. The materials presented here range from the Observations, one of Kant's most elegantly written and immediately popular texts, to the accompanying Remarks which Kant wrote in his personal copy of the Observations and which are translated here in their entirety for the first time. This edition also includes little-known essays as well as personal notes and fragments that reveal the emergence of Kant's complex philosophical ideas. Those familiar with Kant's later works will discover a Kant interested in the 'beauty' as well as the 'dignity' of humanity, in human diversity as well as the universality of morals, and in practical concerns rather than abstract philosophizing. Readers will be able to see Kant's development from the Observations through the Remarks towards the moral philosophy that eventually made him famous.

Kant s Tugendlehre

Kant's 'Metaphysics of Morals': Interpretative Essays, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 289–316. Frierson, Patrick R. (2003), Freedom and Anthropology in Kant's Moral Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Kant s  Tugendlehre

Building on the results of the Groundwork and the Critique of Practical Reason, Kant finally published his system of moral philosophy in two volumes in 1797. By then, he had been planning to write a Metaphysics of Morals for three decades; but only the title remained unchanged while the basic principles of his theoretical and practical philosophy changed dramatically. While for many years academic moral philosophy focused mainly on Kant’s earlier ethical treatises, there has recently been much interest in this later and perhaps more mature work on moral philosophy, particularly the ethical part of the Metaphysics of Morals, the “Metaphysical Principles of the Doctrine of Virtue” or “Tugendlehre”. The present volume responds to these demands. Following a series of research workshops, 18 scholars from Germany, Italy, Britain and the United States provide a seamless commentary on the “Doctrine of Virtue”, discussing topics such as suicide, truthfulness, moral perfection, beneficence, gratitude, sympathy, respect and friendship as well as Kant’s moral psychology, philosophy of action and theory of moral education. This book will be an invaluable resource for moral philosophers and Kant scholars alike.