Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay

... we may assume that it was acted occasionally during the reigns of James and Charles I. There are three early editions of Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay , but only the first of these , the rare quarto of 1594 , has any textual value .

Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay

Robert Greene (1558-1592) was the author of romances, pamphlets, lyrics, and plays. He was educated at Cambridge and Oxford, and led a remarkably irresponsible and dissolute life. The comedy Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay was probably written and produced around 1589, and was first printed in 1594. Its account of the marvelous exploits of Friar Bacon is drawn from The Famous Historie of Fryer Bacon, a sixteenth-century account of the legends surrounding the Oxford Franciscan, Roger Bacon (b. 1214). The play was an important influence both on Marlowe's Doctor Faustus and Shakespeare's The Tempest. Daniel Seltzer was professor of English at Harvard University and at Princeton University, as well as an actor on stage and in films.

De R Greeni fabula Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay Being a summary of the drama with remarks on the prose tract on which it is founded Dissertatio etc

I. Summary of Greene's " Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay . " * ) Scene 1 . Edward , prince of Wales , son of Henry III has fallen in love with a keeper's daughter , Margaret , into whose house he has come with a hunting party in ...

De R  Greeni fabula  Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay   Being a summary of the drama  with remarks on the prose tract on which it is founded   Dissertatio  etc


Introduction To English Renaissance Comedy

3 Greene , Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay T o move from Lyly's Endymion to Robert Greene's Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay is to move into the open air . The play was produced at the Rose , somewhere between 1589 and Greene's death in 1592.

Introduction To English Renaissance Comedy

This book provides a comprehensive introduction to Elizabethan, Jacobean and Caroline comedy, covering both public and private theatres, emphasizing the eclectic, experimental nature of this comedy--its departures from the mainstream New Comedy tradition and its searching, witty analysis of social and personal relations in court, city and country. In his close analysis of some of the richest comedies of the period, Alexander Leggatt makes some unexpected connections between them. The reader is given a comprehensive picture of English comedy in one of its most creative periods.

Reading Robert Greene

Locrine: Selimus 19.8; Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay: James IV 3.47; Alphonsus, King of Aragon: James IV 3.40; Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay: Orlando Furioso 3.21; Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay: George a Greene 2.38; James IV: Orlando ...

Reading Robert Greene

Robert Greene holds a significant place in our understanding of Elizabethan literature. This book offers the most rigorous attempt yet undertaken to determine the scope of the playwright’s canon through analyses of Greene’s verse style, vocabulary, rhyming habits, and the dramatist’s phraseology in his attested plays and in comparison to four plays that have long been on the margins of Greene’s corpus: Locrine, Selimus, George a Greene, and A Knack to Know a Knave. The book defines the ranges for Greene’s stylistic habits for the very first time, and proceeds to identify parallels of thought, language, and overall dramaturgy that reveal a single author’s creative consciousness. This volume also casts light on Greene as a more collaborative dramatist than has hitherto been acknowledged. Through emphasizing the immediate surroundings in which Greene was writing – the flourishing of popular theatres in two compact areas of London, in which each theatre company and their dramatists kept a close eye on what their competitors were producing – Greene emerges as an influential playwright, whose restored oeuvre enables us to establish new ways in which his dramatic methods impacted other writers of the period, including Shakespeare.

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England

In plot terms , John of Bordeaux picks up where Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay ended . Emperor Frederick II of Germany hosts a visit from Friar Bacon , returning hospitality received by Frederick , and his magician Vandermast , in Oxford ...

Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England

This volume, published annually, contains essays by critics and cultural historians, as well as reviews of the many books and essays dealing with the cultural history of medieval and early modern England as expressed by and realised in its drama.

Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay

Characters Of the many characters that are found in The Famous Historie Greene incorporated Friar Bacon , Friar Bungay , Miles , and Vandermast into his play . Friar Bacon , the major figure , underwent the greatest change .

Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay


Old English Drama

Greene, Honourable History of Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay Sir Adolphus William Ward. THE HONOURABLE HISTORY OF FRIAR BACON AND FRIAR BUNGAY . KING HENRY THE THIRD . EDWARD , Prince of Wales , his son . EMPEROR OF GERMANY .

Old English Drama


Robert Greene

New Source for Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay,” p. 183. 9 On John Dee«s relationship to Bacon, see Barbara Howard Traister, Heavenly Necromancers: The Magician in English Renaissance Drama (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1984), ...

Robert Greene

While Robert Greene was the most prolific and perhaps the most notorious professional writer in Elizabethan England, he continues to be best known for his 1592 quip comparing Shakespeare to "an upstart crow." In his short twelve-year career, Greene wrote dozens of popular pamphlets in a variety of genres and numerous professional plays. At his premature death in 1592, he was a bonafide London celebrity, simultaneously maligned as Grub-Street profligate and celebrated as literary prodigy. The present volume constitutes the first collection of Greene's reception both in the early modern period and in our present era, offering in its poems, prose passages, essays, and chapters that which is most singular among what has been written about Greene and his work. It also includes a complete list of Greene's contemporary reception until 1640. Kirk Melnikoff's wide-ranging and revisionist introduction organizes this reception generically while at the same time situating it in the context of recent critical methodologies.

Writing Robert Greene

The fool's (foolish) notion—to use Bacon's magic to gain Margaret—has quickly become the prince's strategy. 7 Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay, ed. Daniel Seltzer (Lincoln: The University of Nebraska Press, ...

Writing Robert Greene

Robert Greene, contemporary of Shakespeare and Marlowe and member of the group of six known as the "University Wits," is the subject of this essay collection, the first to be dedicated solely to his work. Although in his short lifetime Greene published some three dozen prose works, composed at least five plays, and was one of the period's most recognized-even notorious-literary figures, his place within the canon of Renaissance writers has been marginal at best. Writing Robert Greene offers a reappraisal of Greene's career and of his contribution to Elizabethan culture. Rather than drawing lines between Greene's work for the pamphlet market and for the professional theatres, the essays in the volume imagine his writing on a continuum. Some essays trace the ways in which Greene's poetry and prose navigate differing cultural economies. Others consider how the full spectrum of his writing contributes to an emergent professional discourse about popular print and theatrical culture. The volume includes an annotated bibliography of recent scholarship on Greene and three valuable appendices (presenting apocrypha; edition information; and editions organized by year of publication).

The Staging of Witchcraft and a Spectacle of Strangeness

133Robert Greene, Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay, ed. by DanielSletzer (London: Edward Arnold, 1964), p. ix. 134 Robert Greene, Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay ([Menston]: Scolar Press, 1973), p. introduction note. 135Greene, Friar Bacon and ...

The Staging of Witchcraft and a    Spectacle of Strangeness

The Staging of Witchcraft and a “Spectacle of Strangeness”: Witchcraft at Court and the Globe presents a new interest in Continental texts on witchcraft coincided with technological advances in the English stage, which made a variety of dramatic effects possible in the private playhouses, such as flying witches, and the appearance of spirits and deities in Elizabethan plays. This book also evaluates how the technology of the Blackfriars playhouse facilitated the appearance of spirits, devils, witches, magicians, deities and dragons on stage. The study investigates the visual spectacle of witchcraft scenes which intersect with the genre of the plays, and it also presents to what extent changing theatrical tastes affect the way that supernatural characters are shown on stage.

Renaissance Plays

Multiple Plotting in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay CHARLES W. HIEATT * N THE SECOND CHAPTER of Some Versions of Pastoral , William Emp- Ison acknowledges Robert Greene's invention of the double plot in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay and ...

Renaissance Plays

Renaissance Drama, an annual and interdisciplinary publication, is devoted to drama and performance as a central feature of Renaissance culture. The essays in each volume explore traditional canons of drama, the significance of performance (broadly construed) to early modern culture, and the impact of new forms of interpretation on the study of Renaissance plays, theater, and performance.

Dissertations

Im Lookingglass findet sich eine anspielung auf Greene's Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay . Adam sagt nämlich : ' his nose was in the highest degree of noses , it was nose autem glorificam ' . Dies geht nach Dyce2 auf folgende stelle im ...

Dissertations


Images of Englishmen and Foreigners in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

Robert Greene , Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay , ed . Daniel Seltzer , Regents Renaissance Drama Series ( London : Edward Arnold , 1964 ) , scene 2 , lines 58-61 . 16. K. Assarsson - Rizzi , " Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay " : A Structural ...

Images of Englishmen and Foreigners in the Drama of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

The emergent national awareness in Europe during the early modern period revealed itself as patriotism and xenophobia during the age of Elizabeth. These sentiments were mainly induced by England's stance in the politico-religious debate that divided Europe, and by the arrival of refugees from abroad who placed a burden on the national economy. The popular feeling led to a multifaceted crystallization of matters native and foreign on the London stage. One manifestation of the new preoccupation was the presentation of stage characters with distinct nationalities. Drawing on stock traits, the dramatists initially created a stage world in which the Englishman was almost invariably superior to the foreigner, both in the native environment and in a continental setting. The glorification of the nation's self-image at the expense of others, however, was not to persist. English society largely absorbed the original shock induced by the influx of foreigners, and toward the end of the 1590s xenophobia lost its strident tone. Patriotism, too, was modified. The year 1588 became a historical date as James I's peace policy grew into the most popular news topic of his reign. These sociopolitical changes challenged the original images of Englishmen and foreigners in the drama. Under a climate with England ignominiously vacating the European political stage, it was difficult to uphold the once unquestioned self-image of the warlike nation. One group of dramatists, therefore, came to present the image as a forsaken ideal that could only be realized if the nation resumed its international duties. Other dramatists presented it as a past ideal and accepted it as an object for nostalgic self-gratification. The favorable self-image also became a target for the satirists. They attacked the old definition of the English and assigned to their own countrymen those properties which had previously been attributed to the foreigner. The caustic speculation on national character traits in Stuart drama was not only induced by the playwrights' discontent with the anachronistic and complimentary Elizabethan self-image. It also represented a budding skepticism with regard to the generalizing tendency involved in the definitions of national character. Inevitably, the image of the foreigner in the drama profited from the redefinition of the Englishman's auto-stereotyped image. As the satire which had previously been aimed at the foreigner came to be largely directed against the Englishman, a degree of rapprochement was established. There was a new exchange, as Richard Brome formulated it in the subtitle to his New Academy. Until the closing of the theaters in 1642, the satirical redefinition of the English national character persisted alongside the nostalgic confirmation of the favorable Elizabethan self-image. These divergent views expressed on the London stage bring into focus a national identity crisis. It parallels the growing contemporary conviction that the nation had traded in its decisive role on the European political scene for that of a passive onlooker.

Critical Analyses in English Renaissance Drama

Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay " : A Structural and Thematic Analysis of Robert Greene's Play . LSE , 44. Lund : C.W.K. Gleerup , 1972. [ Not all insights into form and style in this 154 - page study have interpretive value ( or make for ...

Critical Analyses in English Renaissance Drama

This bibliographic guide directs the reader to a prize selection of the best modern, analytical studies of every play, anonymous play, masque, pageant, and "entertainment" written by more than two dozen contemporaries of Shakespeare in the years between 1580 and 1642. Together with Shakespeare's plays, these works comprise the most illustrious body of drama in the English language.

Reading the Medieval in Early Modern England

Yet, as I have shown, Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay resists this 'symbolic' or homogeneous vision of the Middle Ages, as the explosion of Friar Bacon's talking head calls into question a linear andcompartmentalisedvisionofhistory.

Reading the Medieval in Early Modern England

A contributory volume on the effect of medieval culture and literature on early modern England.