Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries

A groundbreaking work-broad in scope and closely detailed study of the true nature of early Chrsitanity in Rome. >

Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries

A groundbreaking work-broad in scope and closely detailed study of the true nature of early Chrsitanity in Rome. >

Beyond Gnosticism

Cf. Lampe, From Paul to Valentinus, 237–238. Grant has suggested that
Ptolemaeus's Letter to Flora was an “appeal to the Christian church of Rome”;
Robert M. Grant, “Notes on Gnosis,” VigChr 2 (1957): 147; cf. Robert M. Grant,
Heresy and ...

Beyond Gnosticism

Valentinus was a popular, influential, and controversial early Christian teacher. His school flourished in the second and third centuries C.E. Yet because his followers ascribed the creation of the visible world not to a supreme God but to an inferior and ignorant Creator-God, they were from early on accused of heresy, and rumors were spread of their immorality and sorcery. Beyond Gnosticism suggests that scholars approach Valentinians as an early Christian group rather than as a representative of ancient "Gnosticism"-a term notoriously difficult to define. The study shows that Valentinian myths of origin are filled with references to lifestyle (such as the control of emotions), the Christian community, and society, providing students with ethical instruction and new insights into their position in the world. While scholars have mapped the religio-historical and philosophical backgrounds of Valentinian myth, they have yet to address the significance of these mythmaking practices or emphasize the practical consequences of Valentinians' theological views. In this groundbreaking study, Ismo Dunderberg provides a comprehensive portrait of a group hounded by other Christians after Christianity gained a privileged position in the Roman Empire. Valentinians displayed a keen interest in mythmaking and the interpretation of myths, spinning complex tales about the origin of humans and the world. As this book argues, however, Valentinian Christians did not teach "myth for myth's sake." Rather, myth and practice were closely intertwined. After a brief introduction to the members of the school of Valentinus and the texts they left behind, Dunderberg focuses on Valentinus's interpretation of the biblical creation myth, in which the theologian affirmed humankind's original immortality as a present, not lost quality and placed a special emphasis on the "frank speech" afforded to Adam by the supreme God. Much like ancient philosophers, Valentinus believed that the divine Spirit sustained the entire cosmic chain and saw evil as originating from conspicuous "matter." Dunderberg then turns to other instances of Valentinian mythmaking dominated by ethical concerns. For example, the analysis and therapy of emotions occupy a prominent place in different versions of the myth of Wisdom's fall, proving that Valentinians, like other educated early Christians, saw Christ as the healer of emotions. Dunderberg also discusses the Tripartite Tractate, the most extensive account to date of Valentinian theology, and shows how Valentinians used cosmic myth to symbolize the persecution of the church in the Roman Empire and to create a separate Christian identity in opposition to the Greeks and the Jews.

Evocations of the Calf

Peter Lampe, From Paul to Valentinus: Christians at Rome in the First Two
Centuries, ed. Marshall D. Johnson, trans. Michael Steinhauser (Minneapolis:
Fortress, 2003), 75. 103 Lampe, From Paul to Valentinus, 76, italics his. 104
Echoes of ...

Evocations of the Calf

This study proposes that both constitutively and rhetorically (through ironic, inferential, and indirect application), Ps 106(105) serves as the substructure for Paul’s argumentation in Rom 1:18–2:11. Constitutively, Rom 1:18–32 hinges on the triadic interplay between “they (ex)changed” and “God gave them over,” an interplay that creates a sin–retribution sequence with an a-ba-ba-b pattern. Both elements of this pattern derive from Ps 106(105):20, 41a respectively. Rhetorically, Paul ironically applies the psalmic language of idolatrous “(ex)change” and God’s subsequent “giving-over” to Gentiles. Aiding this ironic application is that Paul has cast his argument in the mold of Hellenistic Jewish polemic against Gentile idolatry and immorality, similar to Wis 13–15. In Rom 2:1–4, however, Paul inferentially incorporates a hypocritical Jewish interlocutor into the preceding sequence through the charge of doing the “same,” a charge that recalls Israel’s sins recounted in Ps 106(105). This incorporation then gives way to an indirect application of Ps 106(105):23, by means of an allusion to Deut 9–10 in Rom 2:5–11. Secondarily, this study suggests that Paul’s argumentation exploits an intra-Jewish debate in which evocations of the golden calf figured prominently.

Paul s Inclusive Ethic

Paul went to see them ” ( Acts 18 : 1 - 2 NRSV ) . 09 Marxsen , Introduction to the
NT , 98 - 100 . 67 Peter Lampe , From Paul to Valentinus : Christians Chapter 1 .
Survey of Scholarship Contemporary Scholars Willi Marxsen (1963 [English ...

Paul s Inclusive Ethic

Adapted from the author's dissertation (Ph. D.)--Loyola University Chicago, 2007.

The Acts of Paul

“Principal orientations on the Relations between the Apocryphal Acts (Acts of
Paul and Acts of John; Acts of Peter and Acts of John).” In 1993 SBLSP ... Lampe,
Peter. From Paul to Valentinus: Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries.

The Acts of Paul

This is the most complete translation of the Acts of Paul in English, together with a detailed commentary. The orientation is primarily literary, with detailed attention to the history of composition and revision. Unlike many studies, this commentary does not focus upon the story of Thecla.

Paul Judaism and the Gentiles

For Paul, a shared Christian identity based on “faith” must supersede this
erroneous law-oriented definition of Christian identity, ... see especially K.
Donfried, “A Short Note on Romans 16,” passim; P. Lampe, From Paul to
Valentinus, 153-64.

Paul  Judaism  and the Gentiles

This book is novel in its questioning of the adequacy of interpreting Paul from the perspective of the Reformation and in its application of sociological methods to the New Testament.

Beyond Old and New Perspectives on Paul

“douglas campbell's apocalyptic, rhetorical Paul: review article.” Horizons in
Biblical Theology 32.2 (2010) ... From Paul to Valentinus: Christians at Rome in
the First Two Centuries. translated by Michael steinhauser. 1989. reprint.
Minneapolis: ...

Beyond Old and New Perspectives on Paul

New Testament studies are witnessing many exciting developments. And Douglas Campbell's groundbreaking publications are an important contribution to future discussions relating to Paul. Familiar problems relating to justification, old and new perspectives, and much more besides, have been tackled in fresh and exciting ways, setting down challenge after challenge to all those involved in Pauline studies. Campbell's publications therefore demand serious engagement. This book seeks to facilitate academic engagement with Campbell's work in a unique way. It contains numerous chapters critiquing his proposals, while others summarize the key themes succinctly. But it also contains Campbell's own response to the reception of his work, allowing him space to outline how his thinking has developed. In so doing, this work allows readers to be drawn into a vitally important conversation. It is academic theology in the making and constitutes the cutting edge of Pauline studies.

Dynamic Oneness

The Significance and Flexibility of Paul's One-God Language Suzanne Nicholson
. briefly, they indicate very strong motivations that ... 10. Stuhlmacher, “Purpose of
Romans,” 237. 11. See Lampe's discussion in From Paul to Valentinus, 11–16.

Dynamic Oneness

The apostle Paul affirms in several places that there is only one God. Yet in the same letters Paul also gives praise to the Lord Jesus Christ, often using language similar to his descriptions of God. How can this self-avowed Hebrew of Hebrews reconcile these ideas? This book explores the strongest one-God statements in Paul's undisputed letters and asks how Paul's Jewish monotheistic understanding informs his overall argument. These three texts--1 Corinthians 8:6, Galatians 3:20, and Romans 3:30--occur in very different contexts and address different issues. By looking at the historical, cultural, and grammatical contexts of these passages, as well as Paul's language about God and Christ elsewhere in these letters, Dr. Nicholson argues that Paul's understanding of the one God is not static or perfunctory; rather, it is dynamic and flexible, influencing significant aspects of Paul's Gospel message. Paul's ethics, his view of salvation history, and his soteriology are fundamentally shaped by his understanding of the one God of Israel.

The Spiritual Seed

CHAPTER THIRTY VALENTINUS: BIOGRAPHY AND SOURCES Life In Rome
around 155–160, Justin Martyr is able to identify a particular group of Christians
he calls ... II/1, 275–82, 289–90; Lampe, From Paul to Valentinus, 260. It is not ...

The Spiritual Seed

This book is the first comprehensive study of the doctrines and history of "Valentinianism," making full use of the documents from Nag Hammadi as well as the reports of the Church Fathers.

F C Baur s Synthesis of B hme and Hegel

101 For details about the relationship between Valentinus and Clement of
Alexandria, see Peter Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries.
From Paul to Valentinus (London: Continuum, 2003), 295. 102 Whether
Valentinus was a ...

F  C  Baur s Synthesis of B  hme and Hegel

In this book, Professor Simuț demonstrates how Baur came to understand Christian theology as a Gnostic philosophy of religion under the influence of Böhme's unorthodox esoteric theosophy and Hegel's modern religious philosophy.

Eucharist and Ecumenism

Lampe, From Paul to Valentinus, 259. Lampe writes: “A topographical
identification is impossible. Nevertheless, the note indicates a rented apartment.”
37.38. 39.40. 41. 42. 43.44.92–99.45.46. 47.48. 49.50. 51. 52. 54.55.56. 57.58.
60. 61. 62.

Eucharist and Ecumenism

Most Christians worship on a regular basis on the Lord's Day. They have done so from the beginning, and their worship has centered on the Eucharist, following Jesus's words, Do this in remembrance of me. Over the two millennia of the Christian tradition there have been shifts of emphasis and understanding about the Eucharist. This book attempts to point out, by providing accessible accounts of both liturgies and liturgists across the centuries and traditions, just how much different Christians have in common and how they can benefit from attending to one another's worship. The author's ultimate hope is that in its small way, the book will contribute to Christians worshiping together.

Romans

Paul and His Story: (Re)Interpreting the Exodus Tradition. JSNTSup 181. ... Paul
and the New Perspective: Second Thoughts on the Origin of Paul's Gospel. ...
2003a. From Paul to Valentinus: Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries.

Romans

A helpfully concise commentary on Paul's letter to the early Christians in Rome, which the Apostle wrote just a few years before the outbreak of Nero's persecution. Keener examines each paragraph for its function in the letter as a whole, helping the reader follow Paul's argument. Where relevant, he draws on his vast work in ancient Jewish and Greco-Roman sources in order to help modern readers understand the message of Romans according to the way the first audience would have heard it. Throughout, Keener focuses on major points that are especially critical for the contemporary study of Paul's most influential and complex New Testament letter.

Abingdon New Testament Commentaries Romans

In The Conversation Continues: Studies in Paul and john in Honor of J. Louis
Martyn, edited by Robert T. Fortna and Beverly R. Gaventa, 85-97. Nashville: ...
2003a. From Paul to Valentinus: Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries ...

Abingdon New Testament Commentaries  Romans

Like widely differing siblings raised by the same parents, each letter produced by Paul has its own distinguishing character. For the historically minded critic, each letter’s unique traits provide important clues for detecting the circumstances in which Paul wrote it as well as what he hoped to achieve with it. Scholars assume that by examining the content of the letter (the “answer”), they can infer the readers’ situation that Paul is addressing (the “question”)--a method sometimes called “mirror reading.” In the case of Romans, however, both the particular traits and the overall content are so unusual that scholars continue to debate why Paul wrote precisely this letter and what he hoped to achieve by it in Rome." So begins Leander Keck's seminal work on the New Testament book of Romans. Keck asserts that because Romans is part of the New Testament, we can compare it with the other letters ascribed to Paul, as well as with what Acts reports about his message and mission. But the first readers of Romans had only this letter; they could compare it only with what they may have heard about him. While this commentary does from time to time compare Romans with what Paul had said before, it concentrates on Romans itself; what Paul says in this text should not be conflated with--nor inflated into--what he thought comprehensively, though it is essential to understand that as well. "We do not really need another major commentary [on Romans] that loses us in the minutiae of word studies, literary parallels, sociological and rhetorical hypotheses; we have such in plenty. The Abingdon series, however, by its limited size, forces the contributor to focus on the primary task of the commentator: to clarify the meaning (intended or potential) of the words of the text and to provide some basic reflection on its/their continuing significance. And that is where Keck excels." - James D. G. Dunn, Review of Biblical Literature 04/2006.

Emerging Leadership in the Pauline Mission

Third, it can hardly be accidental that Paul writes a letter, in which he engages as
nowhere else with the pressures and influences of Roman imperial ideology,
from ... For a slightly different count, see Lampe, From Paul to Valentinus, 359–60
.

Emerging Leadership in the Pauline Mission

Where did Paul find leaders for his new churches? How did he instruct and develop them? What processes took place to stabilize the churches and institute their new leadership? This book carves a fresh trail in leadership studies by looking at leadership development from a group-dynamic, social identity perspective. Paul engages the cultural leadership patterns of his key local leaders, publicly affirming, correcting, and improving those patterns to conform to a Christlike pattern of sacrificial service. Paul's own life and ministry offer a motivational and authoritative model for his followers, because he embodies the leadership style he teaches. As a practical theologian avant la lettre, Paul contextualizes key theological themes to strengthen community and leadership formation, and equips his church leaders as entrepreneurs of Christian identity. A careful comparison of the Corinthian and Ephesian churches demonstrates a similar overall pattern of development. This study engages Pauline scholarship on church office in depth and offers alternative readings of five Pauline epistles, generating new insights to enrich dogmatic and practical theological reflection. In a society where many churches reflect on their missional calling, such input from the NT for contemporary Christian leadership formation is direly needed.

The Dying God

Paul.” When Valentinus' disciple Ptolemy tells Flora of “apostolic tradition” that “
we too have received from succession,” he refers apparently, to this secret
tradition about the savior received through Paul. Valentinus himself often alludes
to ...

The Dying God

Few would acknowledge that our knowledge of history could be significantly inaccurate. The most common conception of history is one that begins in Greece, the "cradle of Western civilization", then progresses through Rome, and finally Europe and America. However, this merely represents a strictly Western version of history, and one that is often confused with the history of the World. Fortunately though, recent scholarship has begun to elucidate the extent of the indebtedness of Western history to other civilizations, rendering our notion of "Western" civilization obsolete. Rather, a more accurate assessment of the past will reveal a neglected account, the hidden history of Western civilization, which began in Mesopotamia, in the sixth century BC, with the birth of a tradition centered around the myth of a dying god. The development of this tradition led to the emergence of philosophy among the Greeks, then influenced the formation of Christianity, and was appropriated and elaborated upon by the Arabs during the Middle Ages. Ultimately, being introduced to Europe during the Crusades, it eventually spawned the Renaissance and the Enlightenment.

New Testament Theology

Hiebert, Paul. 2000. “Spiritual Warfare and Worldviews.” Direction 29:214–24.
Hunsberger, George R. 1998. “Missional Vocation: Called and Sent ... From Paul
to Valentinus: Christians atRome in the First Two Centuries. Translated by
Michael ...

New Testament Theology

New Testament theology ought to be both descriptive and constructive-this is the argument of New Testament Theology: Extending the Table. According to Isaak, New Testament theology is descriptive in that it deals with the accounts that people narrate of their experience with Yahweh, the God of Israel, in the light of Easter. It is constructive in that it joins the diverse testimonies of the New Testament writers into a textured and thick space within which contemporary followers of Jesus continue to be shaped by the ancient yet living Spirit of God. Isaak's approach is historical, thematic, and theological in orientation. It explores the conversation taking place around the table, where the writers of the NT share their guiding vision of God's saving work among them, and their passion for the Christian church engaged in God's mission. The differing perspectives of the New Testament authors are held together without reduction, forming a deep and rich space within which ongoing community reflection and praxis can take place.

Romans Teach the Text Commentary Series

From Paul to Valentinus: Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries. Edited by
Marshall D. Johnson. Translated by Michael Steinhauser. Minneapolis: Fortress,
2003. ———. “The Roman Christians of Romans 16.” In The Romans Debate, ...

Romans  Teach the Text Commentary Series

The Teach the Text Commentary Series utilizes the best of biblical scholarship to provide the information a pastor needs to communicate the text effectively. The carefully selected preaching units and focused commentary allow pastors to quickly grasp the big idea and key themes of each passage of Scripture. Each unit of the commentary includes the big idea and key themes of the passage and sections dedicated to understanding, teaching, and illustrating the text.

Chop Suey USA

Peter Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to
Valentinus (London: Continuum, 2006), 172. 3. “The Cooleys,” Sacramento
Union, May 1, 1852. 4. Alta California (San Francisco), August 1, 1853. 5.
Rodman W. Paul ...

Chop Suey  USA

American diners began to flock to Chinese restaurants more than a century ago, making Chinese food the first mass-consumed cuisine in the United States. By 1980, it had become the country's most popular ethnic cuisine. Chop Suey, USA offers the first comprehensive interpretation of the rise of Chinese food, revealing the forces that made it ubiquitous in the American gastronomic landscape and turned the country into an empire of consumption. Engineered by a politically disenfranchised, numerically small, and economically exploited group, Chinese food's tour de America is an epic story of global cultural encounter. It reflects not only changes in taste but also a growing appetite for a more leisurely lifestyle. Americans fell in love with Chinese food not because of its gastronomic excellence but because of its affordability and convenience, which is why they preferred the quick and simple dishes of China while shunning its haute cuisine. Epitomized by chop suey, American Chinese food was a forerunner of McDonald's, democratizing the once-exclusive dining-out experience for such groups as marginalized Anglos, African Americans, and Jews. The rise of Chinese food is also a classic American story of immigrant entrepreneurship and perseverance. Barred from many occupations, Chinese Americans successfully turned Chinese food from a despised cuisine into a dominant force in the restaurant market, creating a critical lifeline for their community. Chinese American restaurant workers developed the concept of the open kitchen and popularized the practice of home delivery. They streamlined certain Chinese dishes, such as chop suey and egg foo young, turning them into nationally recognized brand names.

Holy Sh t

... 1978), 99–132; Peter Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries:
From Paul to Valentinus (London: Continuum, 2003), 172–73; Mary T. Boat-
wright, Peoples of the Roman World (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
2012), ...

Holy Sh t

Almost everyone swears, or worries about not swearing, from the two year-old who has just discovered the power of potty mouth to the grandma who wonders why every other word she hears is obscene. Whether they express anger or exhilaration, are meant to insult or to commend, swear words perform a crucial role in language. But swearing is also a uniquely well-suited lens through which to look at history, offering a fascinating record of what people care about on the deepest levels of a culture--what's divine, what's terrifying, and what's taboo. Holy Sh*t tells the story of two kinds of swearing--obscenities and oaths--from ancient Rome and the Bible to today. With humor and insight, Melissa Mohr takes readers on a journey to discover how "swearing" has come to include both testifying with your hand on the Bible and calling someone a *#$&!* when they cut you off on the highway. She explores obscenities in ancient Rome--which were remarkably similar to our own--and unearths the history of religious oaths in the Middle Ages, when swearing (or not swearing) an oath was often a matter of life and death. Holy Sh*t also explains the advancement of civility and corresponding censorship of language in the 18th century, considers the rise of racial slurs after World War II, examines the physiological effects of swearing (increased heart rate and greater pain tolerance), and answers a question that preoccupies the FCC, the US Senate, and anyone who has recently overheard little kids at a playground: are we swearing more now than people did in the past? A gem of lexicography and cultural history, Holy Sh*t is a serious exploration of obscenity--and it also just might expand your repertoire of words to choose from the next time you shut your finger in the car door.

Announcing the Feast

See also A. Hamman, “Valeur et signification des renseignements liturgiques de
Justin,” Studia Patristica 13 (1975): 364–74; and Peter Lampe, From Paul to
Valentinus: Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries (Minneapolis and
London: ...

Announcing the Feast

How does the entrance song of the Mass function within the Roman Rite? What can it express theologically? What should Roman Catholics sing at the beginning of Mass? In this groundbreaking study, Jason McFarland answers these and other important questions by exploring the history and theology of the entrance song of Mass. After a careful history of the entrance song, he investigates its place in church documents. He proposes several models of the entrance song for liturgical celebration today. Finally, he offers a skillful theological analysis of the entrance song genre, focusing on the song for the Holy Thursday Evening Mass-arguably the most important entrance song of the entire liturgical year. Announcing the Feast provides the most comprehensive treatment of the Roman Rite entrance song to date. It is unique in that it bridges the disciplines of liturgical studies, musicology, and theological method.