Frontier Women and Their Art

Frontier Women and Their Art surveys the crafts and talents of a variety of creators and originators occupying the American wilderness, from the swamps of Louisiana and the outback of the Ozarks to the Far West territories before they ...

Frontier Women and Their Art

While often less celebrated than their male counterparts, women have been vital contributors to the arts for centuries. Works by women of the frontier represent treasured accomplishments of American culture and still impress us today, centuries after their creation. The breadth of creative expression by women of this time period is as impressive as the women themselves. In Frontier Women and Their Art: A Chronological Encyclopedia, Mary Ellen Snodgrass explores the rich history of women’s creative expression from the beginning of the Federalist era to the end of the 19th century. Focusing particularly on Western artistic style, the importance of cultural exchange, and the preservation of history, this book captures a wide variety of artistic accomplishment, such as: Folk music, frontier theatrics, and dancing Quilting, stitchery, and beadwork Sculpture and adobe construction Writing, translations, and storytelling Individual talents highlighted in this volume include basketry by Nellie Charlie, acting by Blanche Bates, costuming by Annie Oakley, diary entries from Emily French, translations by Sacajawea, flag designs by Nancy Kelsey, photography by Jennie Ross Cobb, and singing by Lotta Crabtree. Each entry includes a comprehensive bibliography of primary and secondary sources, as well as further readings on the female artists and their respective crafts. This text also defines and provides examples of technical terms such as applique, libretto, grapevine, farce, coil pots, and quilling. With its informative entries and extensive examinations of artistic talent, Frontier Women and Their Art is a valuable resource for students, scholars, and anyone interested in learning about some of the most influential and talented women in the arts.

Georgia s Frontier Women

The hope was that women would take up raw silk production by the thousands and that the project would prove its ... In July 1740 Major Horton warned the Earl of Egmont that “if that woman should die, the art would be lost,” and she ...

Georgia s Frontier Women

Ranging from Georgia's founding in the 1730s until the American Revolution in the 1770s, Georgia's Frontier Women explores women's changing roles amid the developing demographic, economic, and social circumstances of the colony's settling. Georgia was launched as a unique experiment on the borderlands of the British Atlantic world. Its female population was far more diverse than any in nearby colonies at comparable times in their formation. Ben Marsh tells a complex story of narrowing opportunities for Georgia's women as the colony evolved from uncertainty toward stability in the face of sporadic warfare, changes in government, land speculation, and the arrival of slaves and immigrants in growing numbers. Marsh looks at the experiences of white, black, and Native American women-old and young, married and single, working in and out of the home. Mary Musgrove, who played a crucial role in mediating colonist-Creek relations, and Marie Camuse, a leading figure in Georgia's early silk industry, are among the figures whose life stories Marsh draws on to illustrate how some frontier women broke down economic barriers and wielded authority in exceptional ways. Marsh also looks at how basic assumptions about courtship, marriage, and family varied over time. To early settlers, for example, the search for stability could take them across race, class, or community lines in search of a suitable partner. This would change as emerging elites enforced the regulation of traditional social norms and as white relationships with blacks and Native Americans became more exploitive and adversarial. Many of the qualities that earlier had distinguished Georgia from other southern colonies faded away.

Women of the Frontier

Women and men both believed that frontier rawness needed reform. Men, however, could initiate change through their votes and by holding public office. Without political rights, women found other ways to push for change. As the art of ...

Women of the Frontier

An Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People Using journal entries, letters home, and song lyrics, the women of the West speak for themselves in these tales of courage, enduring spirit, and adventure. Women such as Amelia Stewart Knight traveling on the Oregon Trail, homesteader Miriam Colt, entrepreneur Clara Brown, army wife Frances Grummond, actress Adah Isaacs Menken, naturalist Martha Maxwell, missionary Narcissa Whitman, and political activist Mary Lease are introduced to readers through their harrowing stories of journeying across the plains and mountains to unknown land. Recounting the impact pioneers had on those who were already living in the region as well as how they adapted to their new lives and the rugged, often dangerous landscape, this exploration also offers resources for further study and reveals how these influential women tamed the Wild West.

Concise Dictionary of Women Artists

While O'Keeffe was apparently wilful from a young age, she also had within her family a number of selfsufficient, independent female role models: both her grandmothers had been frontier women who had raised their families alone, ...

Concise Dictionary of Women Artists

This book includes some 200 complete entries from the award-winning Dictionary of Women Artists, as well as a selection of introductory essays from the main volume.

Frontier s End

All three places found their way into Women and Wives , as did his first marriage and divorce . ... The major conflict in the novel revolves around the tendency of marriage to stifle the growth of the artist . The politics of marriage ...

Frontier s End

The western frontier was officially pronounced closed in 1890, the year Harvey Fergusson was born in Albuquerque. He spent his life reopening it in a series of novels stretching from the classic Wolf Song to the belatedly acclaimed Grant of Kingdom and The Conquest of Don Pedro. In this first full biography and critical study, Robert F. Gish sees Fergusson as a modern frontiersman in love with the outdoors, women, and writing. The scion of New Mexico family prominent in business and politics, Fergusson moved restlessly from one new frontier to another, always seeking to recreate in his life and work the adventure and freedom enjoyed by his ancestors. After a strenuous open-air life by the Rio Grande he went east to raise a ruckus us a journalist and then to Hollywood as a screenwriter, all the while testing his sexual mettle. Finally freelance writing was the only frontier available to one of his imaginative energy. Fergusson?s early novel Wolf Song is still considered one of the best ever written about the mountain man. Gish shows the writer embracing the gloriously masculine and atavistic role of a ?lone rider? even as he scorned ?the worship of the primitive.? Fergusson struck up a friendship with H. L. Mencken and Theodore Dreiser (who influenced his literary style) and played a part in the development of Taos and Santa Fe as meccas for artists and writers. Based on extensive research, including Fergusson?s diaries and correspondence, Frontier?s End goes a long way toward reconciling the regional with the mainstream in American literature in the person of a serious novelist whose importance is finally being recognized.

Pioneer Mother Monuments

... American painting), authentically depicted the spirit of frontier women who followed their pioneer husbands westward. AUTHENTIC COWBOY ART Phimister Proctor prided himself on the authenticity of his western-themed sculptures.

Pioneer Mother Monuments

For more than a century, American communities erected monuments to western pioneers. Although many of these statues receive little attention today, the images they depict—sturdy white men, saintly mothers, and wholesome pioneer families—enshrine prevailing notions of American exceptionalism, race relations, and gender identity. Pioneer Mother Monuments is the first book to delve into the long and complex history of remembering, forgetting, and rediscovering pioneer monuments. In this book, historian Cynthia Culver Prescott combines visual analysis with a close reading of primary-source documents. Examining some two hundred monuments erected in the United States from the late nineteenth century to the present, Prescott begins her survey by focusing on the earliest pioneer statues, which celebrated the strong white men who settled—and conquered—the West. By the 1930s, she explains, when gender roles began shifting, new monuments came forth to honor the Pioneer Mother. The angelic woman in a sunbonnet, armed with a rifle or a Bible as she carried civilization forward—an iconic figure—resonated particularly with Mormon audiences. While interest in these traditional monuments began to wane in the postwar period, according to Prescott, a new wave of pioneer monuments emerged in smaller communities during the late twentieth century. Inspired by rural nostalgia, these statues helped promote heritage tourism. In recent years, Americans have engaged in heated debates about Confederate Civil War monuments and their implicit racism. Should these statues be removed or reinterpreted? Far less attention, however, has been paid to pioneer monuments, which, Prescott argues, also enshrine white cultural superiority—as well as gender stereotypes. Only a few western communities have reexamined these values and erected statues with more inclusive imagery. Blending western history, visual culture, and memory studies, Prescott’s pathbreaking analysis is enhanced by a rich selection of color and black-and-white photographs depicting the statues along with detailed maps that chronologically chart the emergence of pioneer monuments.

Pioneer Women

The Lives of Women on the Frontier Linda S. Peavy, Ursula Smith ... Morrow , Delores J. “ Female Photographers on the Frontier : Montana's Lady Photographic Artists , 1866-1900 ... Texas : Amon Carter Museum of Western Art , 1970 . 68.

Pioneer Women

Describes the lives of women of various backgrounds as they traveled west, established homes, worked inside and outside the home, and helped to develop settled society

Memory Work

58 Thus, the New Frontier embraced women's artistic endeavors and gave them a political gloss; women of “position and appeal” nurtured the advancement of the arts and cultivated art appreciation, but only rarely lobbied for the arts in ...

Memory Work

"Memory Work demonstrates the evolution of the pioneering minimalist sculptor Anne Truitt, analyzing the key theme of memory in her practice. In addition to the artist's own popular published writings, which detail the unique challenges facing female artists, Memory Work draws on unpublished manuscripts, private recordings, and never-before-seen working drawings to validate Truitt's original ideas about the link between perception and mnemonic reference in contemporary art."--Provided by publisher.

The Desert is No Lady

Southwestern Landscapes in Women's Writing and Art Vera Norwood, Janice J. Monk ... Beverly J. Stoeltje , “ A Helpmate for Man Indeed : The Image of the Frontier Woman , ” Journal of American Folklore 88 , no .

The Desert is No Lady

Over the past century, women artists and writers have expressed diverse creative responses to the landscape of the Southwest. The Desert Is No Lady provides a cross-cultureal perspective on women by examining Anglo, Hispanic, and Native American women's artistic expressions and the effect of their art in defining the southwestern landscape. The Desert Is No Lady has been made into a motion picture of the same title by Women Make movies, New York, NY "A beautifully crafted book. . . . Although it varies in intensity, the response of women to the environment is virtually always different from the male frontiersman's view of the land as inanimate, boundless, conquerable and controllable." ÑPolly Wells Kaufman in Women's Review of Books "A powerful masterpiece." ÑEve Gruntfest in The Professional Geographer

Sociology of the Arts

Some folk‐art forms are quite stable over long times. Becker (2008: 246–258) discusses quilts. Women on the American frontier created these quilts in community and family groups, passing down techniques and patterns from mother to ...

Sociology of the Arts

Explains the key concepts, theories, and studies in the sociology of the arts—the fully updated new edition of the classic textbook Sociology of the Arts is a comprehensive yet accessible review of sociological approaches to studying the fine, popular, and folk arts. Integrating scholarly literature, theoretical models, and empirical studies, this authoritative textbook provides balanced coverage of a broad range of essential topics—enabling a deeper understanding of the field as a whole. Throughout the text, numerous real-world case studies reinforce key concepts, stimulate classroom discussion, and encourage students to contemplate abstract theoretical issues central to the relationship between art and society. Now in its second edition, this bestselling volume features fully revised content that reflects the most recent literature and research in the field. New discussion on the production and the consumption of culture are complemented by fresh perspectives on changes in the social world such as the rise of the internet and digital media. Updated chapters offer insights into social boundaries and embodiment in the arts, emplacement, materiality, the social construction of art and aesthetics, and more. Exploring how art is created, distributed, received, and consumed, this textbook: Explores both classic work and new approaches in the sociology of the arts Features case studies and discussion questions on art forms including popular music, film, romance novels, visual arts, and classical music Discusses the meaning of artistic objects and why interpretations of art vary Examines the ways art intersects with race, gender, sexuality, and class Includes photographs, tables and figures, and a comprehensive reference list Written by a leading scholar in the field, Sociology of the Arts: Exploring Fine and Popular Forms, Second Edition is an ideal textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses on sociology of art and culture, media studies, anthropology of art, arts management, and the social history of art, and is a useful reference for established scholars studying any aspect of sociology of the arts.

The American West in Bronze 1850 1925

Pioneer Women: The Lives of Women of the Frontier. ... New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Yale University Art Gallery, 1992. Reddin, Paul. ... Denver: Petrie Institute of Western American Art, Denver Art Museum, 2010.

The American West in Bronze  1850 1925

Themes of the American West have been enduringly popular, and 'The American West in Bronze' features sixty-five iconic bronzes that display a range of subjects, from portrayals of the noble Indian to rough-and-tumble scenes of rowdy cowboys to tributes to the pioneers who settled the lands west of the Mississippi. Fascinating texts offer a fresh look at the roles that artists played in creating interpretations of the "vanishing West"--Whether based on fact, fiction or something in-between. These artists, including Charles M. Russell and Frederic Remington, embody a range of life experiences and artistic approaches."'The American West in Bronze, 1850-1925' is the first full-scale exhibition to explore the aesthetic and cultural impulses behind the creation of statuettes with American western themes, which have been so popular with audiences then and now. Both the exhibition and this accompanying catalogue offer a fresh look at the multifaceted roles played by these sculptors in creating three-dimensional interpretations of western life, whether based on historical fact, mythologized fiction, or most often, something in-between. Examples by such archetypal representatives of the West as Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell are complemented by the work of sculptors such as James Earle Fraser and Paul Manship, who contributed to the popularity of the American bronze statuette even though their western subjects were less frequent."--Publisher's description.

Kentucky Women

In debating which women should be profiled and who should be invited to contribute an entry, we considered “the art of the possible.” Some women merited an essay but could not be included because there were no accessible primary sources ...

Kentucky Women

Kentucky Women: Their Lives and Times introduces a history as dynamic and diverse as Kentucky itself. Covering the Appalachian region in the east to the Pennyroyal in the west, the essays highlight women whose aspirations, innovations, activism, and creativity illustrate Kentucky's role in political and social reform, education, health care, the arts, and cultural development. The collection features women with well-known names as well as those whose lives and work deserve greater attention. Shawnee chief Nonhelema Hokolesqua, western Kentucky slave Matilda Lewis Threlkeld, the sisters Emilie Todd Helm and Mary Todd Lincoln, reformers Madeline Mc- Dowell Breckinridge and Laura Clay, activists Anne McCarty Braden and Elizabeth Fouse, politicians Georgia Davis Powers and Martha Layne Collins, sculptor Enid Yandell, writer Harriette Simpson Arnow, and entrepreneur Nancy Newsom Mahaffey are covered in Kentucky Women, representing a broad cross section of those who forged Kentucky's relationship with the American South and the nation at large. With essays on frontier life, gender inequality in marriage and divorce, medical advances, family strife, racial challenges and triumphs, widowhood, agrarian culture, urban experiences, educational theory and fieldwork, visual art, literature, and fame, the contributors have shaped a history of Kentucky that is both grounded and groundbreaking. Contributors: Lindsey Apple on Madeline McDowell Breckinridge; Martha Billips on Harriette Simpson Arnow; James Duane Bolin on Linda Neville; Sarah Case on Katherine Pettit and May Stone; Juilee Decker on Enid Yandell; Carolyn R. Dupont on Georgia Montgomery Davis Powers; Angela Esco Elder on Emilie Todd Helm and Mary Todd Lincoln; Catherine Fosl on Anne Pogue McGinty and Anne McCarty Braden; Craig Thompson Friend on Nonhelema Hokolesqua, Jemima Boone Callaway, and Matilda Lewis Threlkeld; Melanie Beals Goan on Mary Breckinridge; John Paul Hill on Martha Layne Collins; Anya Jabour on Sophonisba Preston Breckinridge; William Kuby on Mary Jane Warfield Clay; Karen Cotton McDaniel on Elizabeth "Lizzie" Fouse; Melissa A. McEuen on Nancy Newsom Mahaffey; Mary Jane Smith on Laura Clay; Andrea S. Watkins on Josie Underwood and Frances Dallam Peter.

Texas Women Writers

Emily Fourmy Cutrer won her award for The Art of the Woman : The Life and Work of Elizabet Ney ( 1988 ) , published by ... after Jo Ella Powell Exley's publication of Texas Tears and Texas Sunshine : Voices of Frontier Women in 1985 .

Texas Women Writers

Texas Women Writers: A Tradition of Their Own is a sweeping account of a rich yet largely ignored literary history covering over 160 years of women's writing in the Lone Star State. Their writings vary widely in theme, setting, and voice; nevertheless, these writers share a distinct tradition that is in part defined by their isolation due to both geography and gender and is wholly different from that of their male counterparts. The introductory essay by the editors covers the history of women writers in Texas from the pioneers to the postmodernists, providing the context and theme for the survey. Critical-biographical portraits of the lives and careers of individual writers both major and minor follow: from novelists, dramatists, and poets, to writers of short stories, children's books, and creative nonfiction. Other essays examine the developmental history of major genres in the region and chronologically review each generation and the particular challenges of time and place that shaped their work. The careers of African-American and Tejana writers are also examined as part of newly emerging literary traditions.

American Reference Books Annual 2019 Edition

... in American hist: the legacy of 9/11, 172 Digital Paxton [Website], 124 Documents of the Lewis & Clark Expedition, 180 Early Calif. population project [Website], 159 Freedom on the move [Website], 160 Frontier women & their art, ...

American Reference Books Annual  2019 Edition

Read professional, fair reviews by practicing academic, public, and school librarians and subject-area specialists that will enable you to make the best choices from among the latest reference resources. • Provides reviews of print and electronic resources, showcasing a wide spectrum for users to consider • Presents unbiased evaluations that allow users to make their own decisions on the suitability of a given resource for their patrons' needs • Gives users access to reviews containing critical, relevant, and timely information from librarians and subject-area specialists

Native Tours

Early on, the Fred Harvey Company brought young women from the East to serve in the new frontiers' hotels and restaurants. ... Mary Colter, a designer and art teacher from Minnesota, worked with the Fred Harvey Company and the Santa Fe ...

Native Tours

The original edition of Native Tours provided a much-needed overview and analysis of anthropologys contributions to tourism as an emerging field of study. Such a cultural perspective illuminated key ideas surrounding worldwide host-guest relationships and the impacts, both negative and positive, of tourism as one of the worlds largest industries. Applying a characteristically uncluttered, authoritative writing style alongside an exceptional command of the relevant literature, Chambers updates, refines, and extends the original concise work. He identifies new or refashioned trends such as green tourism, community-based tourism, heritage and cultural tourism, and domestic tourism in developing nations, as well as discusses how local prejudices influence and often distort views of tourism. Three detailed case studies originating in the American Southwest, the Tirolean Alps, and Belize illustrate the social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental costs and benefits of tourism.

The Art Interchange

It is concisely written , the illusion that the red man is a picturesque READING of this admirably arranged lit. though ... of art interests of the country or as a description , has selected frontier life - its mil . ing women described ...

The Art Interchange


Community Building and Early Public Relations

Women's diaries of the westward journey. ... Regeneration through violence: The mythology of the American Frontier, 1600–1860. ... Pioneer women and Prairie Madonnas: Images of emigrant women in the art of the old West.

Community Building and Early Public Relations

From the start, women were central to a century of westward migration in the U.S. Community Building and Early Public Relations: Pioneer Women’s Role on and after the Oregon Trail offers a path forward in broadening PR's Caucasian/White male-gendered history in the U.S. Undergirded by humanist, communitarian, critical race theory, social constructionist perspectives, and a feminist communicology lens, this book analyzes U.S. pioneer women's lived experiences, drawing parallels with PR's most basic functions – relationship-building, networking, community building, boundary spanning, and advocacy. Using narrative analysis of diaries and reminiscences of women who travelled 2,000+ miles on the Oregon Trail in the mid-to-late 1800s, Pompper uncovers how these women filled roles of Caretaker/Advocate, Community Builder of Meeting Houses and Schools, served a Civilizing Function, offered Agency and Leadership, and provided Emotional Connection for Social Cohesion. Revealed also is an inevitable paradox as Caucasian/White pioneer women’s interactional qualities made them complicit as colonizers, forever altering indigenous peoples’ way of life. This book will be of interest to undergraduate and graduate PR students, PR practitioners, and researchers of PR history and social identity intersectionalities. It encourages us to expand the definition of PR to include community building, and to revise linear timeline and evolutionary models to accommodate voices of women and people of color prior to the twentieth century.

Doing What the Day Brought

Myres, Sandra L. Westering Women and the Frontier Experience, 1800- 1915. Albuquerque, N.M.: University of New ... The Desert Is No Lady: Southwestern Landscapes in Women's Writing and Art. New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1987.

Doing What the Day Brought

"I've seen many changes during the years," says Irene Bishop, "from horse and buggy to automobiles and planes, from palm leaf fans to refrigeration. . . . They talk about the good old days but I do not want to go back. I'd like to go back about twenty years, but not beyond that. Life was too hard." Drawing on interviews with twenty-nine individuals, Doing What the Day Brought examines the everyday lives of women from the late nineteenth century to the present day and demonstrates the role they have played in shaping the modern Arizona community. Focusing on "ordinary" women, the book crosses race, ethnic, religious, economic, and marital lines to include Arizona women from diverse backgrounds. Rather than simply editing each woman's words, Rothschild and Hronek have analyzed these oral histories for common themes and differences and have woven portions into a narrative that gives context to the individual lives. The resulting life-course format moves naturally from childhood to home life, community service, and participation in the work force, and concludes with reflections on changes witnessed in the lifetimes of these women. For the women whose lives are presented here, it may have been common to gather dead saguaro cactus ribs to make outdoor fires to boil laundry water, or to give birth on a dirt floor. Their stories capture not only changes in a state where history has overlooked the role of women, but the changing roles of American women over the course of this century.

The Near East

The but I have little doubt that female “ interest ” in art 1913 frontier was decided upon geographical and econo- has retarded it . What most mars the musical life of mic considerations , after it had been rightly assumed ...

The Near East


Journal of Women s History Guide to Periodical Literature

Oehlschaeger , Fritz H. " Civilization as Emasculation : The Threatening Role of Women in the Frontier Fiction of Harold Bell Wright and ... Seifert , Carolyn J. " Images of Domestic Madness in the Art and Poetry of American Women .

Journal of Women s History Guide to Periodical Literature

"Gayle V. Fischer has produced a terrifically useful volume that no research library should be without." —The Journal of American History "... an indispensable resource to finding material on women's history throughout the world." —Journal of World History "... the work is recommended for its currency, depth of coverage, and scope." —Ethnic Forum As part of its mission to disseminate feminist scholarship and serve as the journal of record for the new area of women's history, the ÂJournal of Women's History began a compilation of periodical literature dealing with women's history. This volume is drawn from more than 750 journals and includes material published from 1980 through 1990. There are forty subject categories and numerous subcategories. The guide lists more than 5,500 articles; all are extensively cross-listed.