German Language Lab

German Language Lab

Containing 300 key words and phrases, Language Lab is an essental tool for travelers needing to communicate in a foreign language. This kit includes 18 lessons dealing with common situations and themes, such as asking directions, ordering a meal, booking into a hotel, touring and shopping. Each lesson is narrated by a native speaker, demonstrating the correct pronunciation and accent, so that you can be easily understood during your travels.

French Language Lab

French Language Lab

Containing 300 key words and phrases, Language Lab is an essental tool for travelers needing to communicate in a foreign language. This kit includes 18 lessons dealing with common situations and themes, such as asking directions, ordering a meal, booking into a hotel, touring and shopping. Each lesson is narrated by a native speaker, demonstrating the correct pronunciation and accent, so that you can be easily understood during your travels.

Bob Jones University

Bob Jones University

Opening its doors as Bob Jones College in College Point, Florida, in 1927, and continuing in such a role in Cleveland, Tennessee, from 1933 to 1947, the school became a university when it relocated to South Carolina in 1947. Founded by world-renowned evangelist Dr. Bob Jones Sr., the university is guided by its mission statement: "Within the cultural and academic soil of liberal arts education, Bob Jones University exists to grow Christ-like character that is Scripturally-disciplined, others-serving, God-loving, Christ-proclaiming, and focused above." The 210-acre Greenville campus has a student body numbering more than 4,200 students from every state and 50 foreign countries.

The Long Road to Stockholm

The Story of Magnetic Resonance Imaging - An Autobiography

The Long Road to Stockholm

In this autobiography, Sir Peter Mansfield describes his life from war time childhood that initially sparked his interest in physics to his work in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that eventually led to the award of the Nobel Prize in 2003. Peter Mansfield grew up in London, but was evacuated to Devon during the blitz and following the V1 and V2 attacks on London. At the end of hostilities, he worked briefly in the printing industry before deciding to pursue his real interests in science by joining the Rocket Propulsion Department at Westcott near Aylesbury. Following a period of National Service and his studies at Queen Mary College, University of London, he married and moved to the USA for two years, returning in 1964 as a Lecturer in Physics at the University of Nottingham. In 1972 he spent a sabbatical period in Heidelberg, and during this period corresponded with his student, Peter Grannell, in Nottingham on the novel idea of magnetic resonance imaging. This led to his first paper on MRI which was presented at the first Specialised Colloque Ampère in 1973. During this period, he demonstrated how the MRI radio signals can be analysed and turned into images of the body. In 2003 the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to Sir Peter and Paul Lauterbur for their crucial achievements in the development of MRI.