Getting Started in Radio Astronomy

Beginner Projects for the Amateur

Getting Started in Radio Astronomy

Radio astronomy is a mystery to the majority of amateur astronomers, yet it is the best subject to turn to when desirous of an expanded knowledge of the sky. This guide intends to instruct complete newcomers to radio astronomy, and provides help for the first steps on the road towards the study of this fascinating subject. In addition to a history of the science behind the pursuit, directions are included for four easy-to-build projects, based around long-term NASA and Stanford Solar Center projects. The first three projects constitute self-contained units available as kits, so there is no need to hunt around for parts. The fourth – more advanced – project encourages readers to do their own research and track down items. Getting Started in Radio Astronomy provides an overall introduction to listening in on the radio spectrum. With details of equipment that really works, a list of suppliers, lists of online help forums, and written by someone who has actually built and operated the tools described, this book contains everything the newcomer to radio astronomy needs to get going.

Fundamentals of Radio Astronomy

Astrophysics

Fundamentals of Radio Astronomy

As demonstrated by five Nobel Prizes in physics, radio astronomy has contributed greatly to our understanding of the Universe. Courses covering this subject are, therefore, very important in the education of the next generation of scientists who will continue to explore the Cosmos. This textbook, the second of two volumes, presents an extensive introduction to the astrophysical processes that are studied in radio astronomy. Suitable for undergraduate courses on radio astronomy, it discusses the physical phenomena that give rise to radio emissions, presenting examples of astronomical objects, and illustrating how the relevant physical parameters of astronomical sources can be obtained from radio observations. Unlike other radio astronomy textbooks, this book provides students with an understanding of the background and the underlying principles, with derivations available for most of the equations used in the textbook. Features: Presents a clear and concise discussion of the important astronomical concepts and physical processes that give rise to both radio continuum and radio spectral line emission Discusses radio emissions from a variety of astronomical sources and shows how the observed emissions can be used to derive the physical properties of these sources Includes numerous examples using actual data from the literature

Four Pillars of Radio Astronomy: Mills, Christiansen, Wild, Bracewell

Four Pillars of Radio Astronomy: Mills, Christiansen, Wild, Bracewell

This is the story of Bernie Mills, Chris Christiansen, Paul Wild and Ron Bracewell, members of a team of radio astronomers that would lead Australia, and the world, into this new field of research. Each of the four is remembered for his remarkable work: Mills for the development the cross type instrument that now bears his name; Christiansen for the application of rotational synthesis techniques; Wild for the masterful joining of observations and theory to elicit the nature of the solar atmosphere; Bracewell for his contribution to imaging theory. As well, these Four Pillars are remembered for creating a remarkable environment for scientific discovery and for influencing the careers of future generations. Their pursuit of basic science helped pave the way for technological developments in areas ranging from Wi-Fi to sonar to medical imaging to air navigation, and for underpinning the foundations of modern cosmology and astrophysics.

Mercury

Mercury


The Early Years of Radio Astronomy

Reflections Fifty Years After Jansky's Discovery

The Early Years of Radio Astronomy

Recollection by pioneers in radio astronomy, to mark the fiftieth anniversary of extraterrestrial radio emission in 1933.

Parkes: Thirty Years of Radio Astronomy

Parkes: Thirty Years of Radio Astronomy

The opening of the Parkes radio telescope in October 1961 placed Australia at the forefront of international research in radio astronomy and ushered in an era of rapid developments in our understanding of the origin and nature of the Universe and our place within it. Thirty years later, the scientists, engineers and technical staff involved in the establishment, operation and subsequent development of this most successful of Australian research instruments gathered to review and reflect on their achievements, and to recount many of the human stories that were so intimately bound up with this extraordinarily productive period in Australia's scientific history. This book presents their accounts of the work and life at Parkes, and provides a fresh perspective on the growth of Australian science over the past three decades.

Data in Astronomy

Data in Astronomy

This unique handbook explains how astronomical data of all kinds should be obtained, compiled, and published if it is to be used to the best advantage by professional astronomers worldwide. Introductory chapters explain how observations are obtained, discuss observatories, and deal with data generally. The central part of the book explains how data are archived and how they should be presented for later use. One chapter raised the important issue of the designation, or naming, of astronomical objects, since this is a topic where confusion is manifest. A further chapter is devoted to astronomical catalogs and the information available from them, and this introduces data bases, data networks, and data centers. The final chapters address general questions of scientific information, including publication, the use of published data, and the role of international organizations handling data.

Single-dish Radio Astronomy

Techniques and Applications : Proceedings of the NAIC-NRAO Summer School Held at National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, Arecibo Observatory, Arecibo, Puerto Rico, USA, 10-15 June 2001

Single-dish Radio Astronomy


The Young Oxford Book of Astronomy

The Young Oxford Book of Astronomy

A survey of astronomy explains its goals and methods, discusses each planet in the solar system, and describes the life cycle of a star

Prematurity in Scientific Discovery

On Resistance and Neglect

Prematurity in Scientific Discovery

"In preparing this remarkable book, Ernest Hook persuaded an eminent group of scientists, historians, sociologists and philosophers to focus on the problem: why are some discoveries rejected at a particular time but later seen to be valid? The interaction of these experts did not produce agreement on 'prematurity' in science but something more valuable: a collection of fascinating papers, many of them based on new research and analysis, which sometimes forced the author to revise a previously-held opinion. The book should be enthusiastically welcomed by all readers who are interested in how science works."—Stephen G. Brush, co-author of Physics, The Human Adventure: From copernicus to Einstein and Beyond "Prematurity and Scientific Discovery contains interesting and insightful papers by numerous well-known scientists and scholars. It will be of wide interest, not only to science studies scholars but also to working scientists and to science-literate general readers."—Thomas Nickles, editor of Scientific Discovery, Logic, and Rationality