The Ghost in the Machine

The Ghost in the Machine

An examination of the human impulse towards self-destruction suggests that in the course of human evolution, a pathological split between emotion and reason developed

The Ghost in the Machine

The Ghost in the Machine

In The Sleepwalkers and The Act of Creation Arthur Koestler provided pioneering studies of scientific discovery and artistic inspiration, the twin pinnacles of human achievement. The Ghost in the Machine looks at the dark side of the coin: our terrible urge to self-destruction... Could the human species be a gigantic evolutionary mistake? To answer that startling question Koestler examines how experts on evolution and psychology all too often write about people with an 'antiquated slot-machine model based on the naively mechanistic world-view of the nineteenth century. His brilliant polemic helped to instigate a major revolution in the life sciences, yet its 'glimpses of an alternative world-view' form only the background to an even more challenging analysis of the human predicament. Perhaps, he suggests, we are a species in which ancient and recent brain structures - or reason and emotion - are not fully co-ordinated. Such in-built deficiencies may explain the paranoia, violence and insanity that are central strands of human history. And however disturbing we find such issues, Koestler contends, it is only when we face our limitations head-on that we can hope to find a remedy.

The Ghost in the Machine

The Ghost in the Machine

Tyler Graham lives in the beautiful Kootenay Valley. One summer night, he follows a strange blinking lights in his back yard to the battered Volkswagen his Uncle Scott died in four years ago. A pale guy Ty's never seen before sits in the driver's seat. "fix it!" he tells Tyler. How's a fifteen-year-old with no mechanical experience supposed to fix a wrecked old car?

Ghost in the Machine

A Play

Ghost in the Machine

(Applause Books). The playscript to Ghost in the Machine by David Gilman begins with a common situation that of a missing fifty dollar bill and spins it into intriguing questions of probability, chance and the complexities of musical composition: illusion and reality.

A Ghost in the Machine

A Midsomer Murders Mystery 7

A Ghost in the Machine

'Simply the best detective writer since Agatha Christie' The Sunday Times Discover the novels that inspired the hit ITV series Midsomer Murders, seen and loved by millions. A Ghost in the Machine is the captivating seventh novel in the Midsomer Murders series starring Detective Chief Inspector Barnaby. Features an exclusive foreword by John Nettles, ITV's DCI Tom Barnaby. If you love Agatha Christie, Ann Granger and James Runcie's The Grantchester Mysteries you'll love the Midsomer Murders mysteries by Caroline Graham. For all its old-fashioned charm, Forbes Abbot is far from the close-knit community that ex-Londoners Mallory and Kate Lawson expected. In this village, everyday squabbles can quickly turn to murder. As the couple begins to settle into their new life away from the big city, it isn't long until they're thrown into the horror and mayhem of a true Midsomer Murders mystery. Detective Chief Inspector Barnaby has encountered many intriguing cases in his years on the force, but soon he will discover that the incident of the ghost in the machine is the most challenging of them all. Praise for Caroline Graham's novels: 'Wickedly acidic, yet sympathetic' Publishers Weekly 'Swift, tense and highly alarming' TLS 'One to savour' Val McDermid 'Lots of excellent character sketches . . . and the dialogue is lively and convincing' Independent 'Hard to praise highly enough' The Sunday Times 'Her books are not just great whodunits but great novels in their own right' Julie Burchill 'Enlivened by a very sardonic wit and turn of phrase, the narrative drive never falters' Birmingham Post 'An uncommonly appealing mystery . . . a real winner' Publishers Weekly 'Read her and you'll be astonished . . . very sexy, very hip and very funny' Scotsman 'The mystery is intriguing, the wit shafts through like sunlight . . . do not miss this book' Family Circle

Ghost in the Machine

Ghost in the Machine

'Classic Scottish noir: bad food, bad moods, too much booze and tight plots' @ey0k1, TwitterFor fans of Ian Rankin, Stuart McBride and Christopher Brookmyre, Ghost in the Machine is the novel that introduced readers to ambitious maverick Detective Constable Scott Cullen, whose series has set the bestseller charts alight.With a messy divorce behind her, Caroline Adamson's future is finally looking up. But after her mutilated body is found, police think Caroline's ex-husband is the main suspect. When one murder becomes three, Edinburgh faces up to the fact that it might have a serial killer in its midst. Then DC Scott Cullen of Lothian and Borders CID starts to question his superiors. Could the answer lie with Schoolbook, the latest social media craze to hit the city? Cullen has only been in the job for three months but he's determined to prove himself, and equally as determined that the right person faces justice. As things take an even darker, personal turn, Cullen realises that he must look closer to home for the answer - before it's too late.A gritty, gripping and wholly satisfying modern crime novel, Ghost in the Machine asks the questions we don't like to ask ourselves. Are we ever safe online, and how do we know who to trust?Reviews for Ghost in the Machine'Rebus has a young pretender to his throne ... [An] excellent read' Andy Caskey, Amazon five-star review'Scott Cullen is superb ... Excellent plot, brilliant location, realistic characters and great dialogues. You'd be mad not to try it. If you're into the crime genre, Ed James is a must-have for your collection' Brian Smith, Amazon five-star review'Fresh and exciting ... Scott Cullen brings a wonderful energy to the world of the police procedural ... I'll definitely be reading more in the series' nigelpbird.blogspot.co.uk'Up there with the best ... managed to keep me guessing right to the end ... Here's hoping DC Scott Cullen has a long career in law enforcement' Phil Moore, Amazon five-star review'Scary and topical. I loved it' Rroberta Stableford, Amazon five-star review'Rankin for the X-box generation' Noj, Amazon five-star review

Neither Ghost nor Machine

The Emergence and Nature of Selves

Neither Ghost nor Machine

If the universe is aimless, how do selves and aims emerge? Why do living beings have aims when inanimate things do not? Current science encourages us to reject the ghost-in-the-machine explanation—that something called spirit, soul, mind, or will was somehow breathed into matter—and instead accept that selves are just matter, in aimless mechanistic motion like everything else. But what about life’s many emergent qualities, the multifarious purposes that shape actual physical behavior not just in human lives, but in all of life? Even the simplest life forms have adaptive functions, traits that accomplish goals or ends. How can we explain the nature and origin of selves and aims without resorting to supernatural forces or explaining them away as nothing but cause-and-effect mechanisms? In Neither Ghost nor Machine, Jeremy Sherman explains the emergence of selves and aims in an aimless universe. He distills for a general audience the theory developed by renowned neuroscientist Terrence Deacon, which extends the breakthrough constraint-based insight that inspired evolutionary, information, and self-organization theory. Emergent dynamics theory provides a testable hypothesis for how mattering arose from matter, function from physics, and means-to-ends behavior from cause-and-effect dynamics. It offers a physics of purpose, demonstrating that there is a strictly physical explanation for the emergence and nature of selves and aims, one that shows our existence in an otherwise inanimate universe is not absurd. Neither Ghost nor Machine bridges the gap between the hard and soft sciences, suggesting fresh and exciting solutions to philosophical mysteries that have perplexed humanity for millennia, from free will to causality to morality.

The Ghost in the Atom

A Discussion of the Mysteries of Quantum Physics

The Ghost in the Atom

Anybody who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it. Niels Bohr's dictum bears witness to the bewildering impact of quantum theory, flying in the face of classical physics and dramatically transforming scientists' outlook on our relationship with the material world. In this book Paul Davies interviews eight physicists involved in debating and testing the theory, with radically different views of its significance.

The Ontogeny of Information

Developmental Systems and Evolution

The Ontogeny of Information

The Ontogeny of Information is a critical intervention into the ongoing and perpetually troubling nature-nurture debates surrounding human development. Originally published in 1985, this was a foundational text in what is now the substantial field of developmental systems theory. In this revised edition Susan Oyama argues compellingly that nature and nurture are not alternative influences on human development but, rather, developmental products and the developmental processes that produce them. Information, says Oyama, is thought to reside in molecules, cells, tissues, and the environment. When something wondrous occurs in the world, we tend to question whether the information guiding the transformation was pre-encoded in the organism or installed through experience or instruction. Oyama looks beyond this either-or question to focus on the history of such developments. She shows that what developmental “information” does depends on what is already in place and what alternatives are available. She terms this process “constructive interactionism,” whereby each combination of genes and environmental influences simultaneously interacts to produce a unique result. Ontogeny, then, is the result of dynamic and complex interactions in multileveled developmental systems. The Ontogeny of Information challenges specialists in the fields of developmental biology, philosophy of biology, psychology, and sociology, and even nonspecialists, to reexamine the existing nature-nurture dichotomy as it relates to the history and formation of organisms.