God and International Relations

This was against God's wishes, as he had commanded man to multiply and have dominion over the whole earth. ... International relations is a discourse firmly embedded on an ontology 48 God and International Relations.

God and International Relations

Religion is prevalent in world politics today, and international relation theory is at pains to understand and explain this phenomenon. This unique study aims to introduce political theology as an appropriate tool to the study of international relations. In accordance with the political theology of Carl Schmitt, which states that modern political concepts are secularized theological concepts, the work questions the "secular" foundations of contemporary international relations theory. Thus it reveals the Christian foundations of the discipline of international relations and delivers a critique of some of its most fundamental theoretical elements, such as its secular view of religion as part of the "irrational," its deification of the political form of the nation state, and its negation of theism in its understanding of responsibility in world politics. The result is a primer on how international relations and its studies have grown out of the political imagination of Christian theology. It will appeal to anyone interested in critical approaches to the field as well as in politics and religion, political theory, and political theology.

God and International Relations

In accordance with the political theology of Carl Schmitt, which states that modern political concepts are secularized theological concepts, the work questions the "secular" foundations of contemporary international relations theory.

God and International Relations

Religion is prevalent in world politics today, and international relation theory is at pains to understand and explain this phenomenon. This unique study aims to introduce political theology as an appropriate tool to the study of international relations. In accordance with the political theology of Carl Schmitt, which states that modern political concepts are secularized theological concepts, the work questions the "secular" foundations of contemporary international relations theory. Thus it reveals the Christian foundations of the discipline of international relations and delivers a critique of some of its most fundamental theoretical elements, such as its secular view of religion as part of the "irrational," its deification of the political form of the nation state, and its negation of theism in its understanding of responsibility in world politics. The result is a primer on how international relations and its studies have grown out of the political imagination of Christian theology. It will appeal to anyone interested in critical approaches to the field as well as in politics and religion, political theory, and political theology.

Kant s International Relations

possible worlds and that it should be believed that it has been arranged just so by God, albeit with a prospect of improvement.” At the center of Kant's “best of all possible worlds” lie human beings, the earth's representative rational ...

Kant s International Relations

Challenges Kantian International Relations scholars to reassess their relationship with the philosopher and his work

The Limits of Ethics in International Relations

In 1776, for instance, he contended that: 'I am as confident as I am that God governs the world as I am that America will never be happy till she gets clear of foreign dominion' (Paine 1989: 45). In 1794 the abolition of the national ...

The Limits of Ethics in International Relations

Ethical constraints on relations among individuals within and between societies have always reflected or invoked a higher authority than the caprices of human will. For over two thousand years Natural Law and Natural Rights were the constellations of ideas and presuppositions that fulfilled this role in the west, and exhibited far greater similarities than most commentators want to admit. Such ideas were the lens through which Europeans evaluated the rest of the world. In his major new book David Boucher rejects the view that Natural Rights constituted a secularisation of Natural Law ideas by showing that most of the significant thinkers in the field, in their various ways, believed that reason leads you to the discovery of your obligations, while God provides the ground for discharging them. Furthermore, the book maintains that Natural Rights and Human Rights are far less closely related than is often asserted because Natural Rights never cast adrift the religious foundationalism, whereas Human Rights, for the most part, have jettisoned the Christian metaphysics upon which both Natural Law and Natural Rights depended. Human Rights theories, on the whole, present us with foundationless universal constraints on the actions of individuals, both domestically and internationally. Finally, one of the principal contentions of the book is that these purportedly universal rights and duties almost invariably turn out to be conditional, and upon close scrutiny end up being 'special' rights and privileges as the examples of multicultural encounters, slavery and racism, and women's rights demonstrate.

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

Fuller, Lon 30–1 Fussell, Paul 124 futurology 7, 9–10 Elshtain, Jean Bethke 34–6, 37, 117–18; Sovereignty: God, State and Self 34; emperor: medieval jurisprudence 19, 104–106, 108, 109, 111, 113 (lord of the world 103, 104, ...

Medieval Foundations of International Relations

The purpose of this volume is to explore the medieval inheritance of modern international relations. Recent years have seen a flourishing of work on the history of international political thought, but the bulk of this has focused on the early modern and modern periods, leaving continuities with the medieval world largely ignored. The medieval is often used as a synonym for the barbaric and obsolete, yet this picture does not match that found in relevant work in the history of political thought. The book thus offers a chance to correct this misconception of the evolution of Western international thought, highlighting that the history of international thought should be regarded as an important dimension of thinking about the international and one that should not be consigned to history departments. Questions addressed include: what is the medieval influence on modern conception of rights, law, and community? how have medieval ideas shaped modern conceptions of self-determination, consent, and legitimacy? are there ‘medieval’ answers to ‘modern’ questions? is the modern world still working its way through the Middle Ages? to what extent is the ‘modern outlook’ genuinely secular? is there a ‘theology’ of international relations? what are the implications of continuity for predominant historical narrative of the emergence and expansion of international society? Medieval and modern are certainly different; however, this collection of essays proceeds from the conviction that the modern world was not built on a new plot with new building materials. Instead, it was constructed out of the rubble, that is, the raw materials, of the Middle Ages.This will be of great interest to students and scholars of IR, IR theory and political theory. .

Battlestar Galactica and International Relations

The angels in the final scenes of 'Daybreak' suggest that god wants the cycle to be broken. ... Gaddis, John Lewis (1992/1993) 'International Relations Theory and the End of the Cold War', International Security 17: 5–58.

Battlestar Galactica and International Relations

Looking at a television franchise like Battlestar Galactica (BSG) is no longer news within the discipline of International Relations. A growing number of scholars in and out of IR are studying the importance of cultural artifacts – popular or otherwise – for the phenomena that make up the core of our discipline. The genre of science fiction offers the analyst an opportunity that cannot be matched by more mimetic genres, namely the chance to look at how sets of widely-circulating expectations of the social serve to constrain authors as they work to introduce as yet unexplored problematiques, the fantasy aspect in much of science fiction storytelling is premised simply on a material difference. As such, while the physical setting of a science fiction tale might appear novel, its imaginative life world will likely retain many elements of the world we already live in and which we can readily recognize as similar to our own. For Critical IR scholarship then, BSG presents an opportunity to examine how these purported homologies or elements of redundancy between the fantastic and the real have been drawn and perhaps to consider, too, whether the show can teach us things about world politics, its various logics and structures, which we might not otherwise be sensitive to. Tackling some of the key contemporary issues in IR, the writers of BSG have taken on a range of important political themes and issues, including the legitimacy of military government, the tactical utility of genocide, and even the philosophical implications of artificial intelligence technologies for the very category of what it means to be 'human'. The contributors in this book explore in depth the argument that one of the most important aspects of popular culture is to naturalize or normalise a certain social order by further entrenching the expectations of social behaviour upon which our mentalities of rule are founded. This work will be of interest to student and scholars of international relations, popular culture and security studies.

Introducing International Relations

People have debated its origins and nature for centuries as part of broader arguments about law, politics, and religion. Does law reflect rules that come directly from God or the gods in the way, for example, many Christians, Jews, ...

Introducing International Relations

This exciting new textbook provides an accessible and lively introduction to international relations for students encountering the subject for the first time. Presenting complex ideas, concepts and arguments in a straightforward and conversational way, the textbook explains international relations from a diplomatic perspective, emphasizing co-existence in the absence of agreement, and developing students’ ability to make sense of the current conditions of international uncertainty. Introducing students to the major theories and issues in international relations, each chapter: is written to a common structure, dividing each topic into sections with learning objectives within each section to provide points of focus for students and instructors includes extensive text box examples and short case studies for reflection and discussion provides key terms, key takeaways and simple exercises which require short responses offers a suggested list of further readings for those who wish to explore a topic further. The first introductory textbook to take a diplomatic approach, this text is essential reading for all those looking to take their first steps into the study of international relations in an era of uncertainty.

Islam and International Relations

To answer the second question regarding the poststructural Muslim, I seek to resolve the inherent problem associated with a Muslim believing in absolute truth (God) and poststructuralism's rejection of meta-narrative, simultaneously.

Islam and International Relations

Questions how we conceive the ‘international’ of IR by constructing a normative political Islam to critique the universalising tendencies of core concepts, such as liberal individualism and the primacy of the state.

International Studies in the Philippines

The usage of these principles to create prescriptions for Philippine international relations seems to point to an implicit assumption that the Bible could be used as a guide for foreign relations and God's active intervention in history ...

International Studies in the Philippines

How can local experiences and the social transformation generated by modernity help to enrich our understanding of the international? What might a version of the much-discussed "non-Western International Relations (IR)" look like? What continuities and discontinuities from the Philippine experience in particular can be useful for understanding other post-colonial polities? The Philippines makes a fascinating case study of a medium-sized, developing, post-colonial, multi-ethnic and multi-cultural state in Southeast Asia. Cruz, Adiong and their contributors map horizons of non-Western approaches in Philippine experiences of IR, rooted in the Global South, and in local customs and practice. Examining both theory and praxis, they explore issues as diverse as pre-colonial history, diplomacy, religion, agrarian reform and the Philippines’ relationship with key regions in the Global South. The book will appeal to researchers interested in Southeast Asian Studies and alternative perspectives on IR.

Christian Approaches to International Affairs

Thomas, 'A globalized God: Religion's growing influence in internationalpolitics', ForeignAffairs 89, no. 6 (November/December 2010); Toft,Philpott and Shah,God's Century. Trying to 'reduce' religion to a variable is foremostthecase of ...

Christian Approaches to International Affairs

Troy analyses how the understanding of religion in Realism and the English School helps in working towards the greater good in international relations, studying religion within the overall framework of international affairs and the field of peace studies.

International Relations and Relational Universe

Relationships with animals also shifted: animal spirits turned to Gods built in the mould of humans and these 'new gods take on the position of authority' (Lent, 2017: 112). At the same time, animals became increasingly domesticated', ...

International Relations and Relational Universe

It is time for International Relations (IR) to join the relational revolution afoot in the natural and social sciences. To do so, more careful reflection is needed on cosmological assumptions in the sciences and also in the study and practice of international relations. In particular it is argued here that we need to pay careful attention to whether and how we think 'relationally'. Building a conversation between relational cosmology, developed in natural sciences, and critical social theory, this book seeks to develop a new perspective on how to think relationally in and around the study of IR. International Relations and Relational Cosmology asks: What kind of cosmological background assumptions do we make as we tackle international relations today and where do our assumptions (about states, individuals, or the international) come from? And can we reorient our cosmological imaginations towards more relational understanding of the universe and what would this mean for the study and practice of international politics? The book argues that we live in a world without 'things', a world of processes and relations. It also suggests that we live in relations which exceed the boundaries of the human and the social, in planetary relations with plants and animals. Rethinking conceptual premises of IR, Kurki points towards a 'planetary politics' perspective within which we can reimagine IR as a field of study and also political practices, including the future of democracy.

For God s Sake

Rushdoony, R. (1973), Institutes of Biblical Law, Phillipsburg NJ: P&R Publishing. Russell Mead, W. (2006), 'God's Country', Foreign Affairs, September/october. Russett, b. (1993), Grasping the Democratic Peace: Principles for a ...

For God s Sake

Religious fundamentalism is a powerful force not only in American domestic politics but also in the way America acts abroad. In For God's Sake Lee Marsden investigates the way that the Christian Right have influenced US foreign policy, arguing that this influence will continue to fuel hostility against the country for many years to come. Marsden looks at how the Religious Right have exerted pressure on America's powerful elite through campaign contributions, lobbying and policy-making, and are training a new generation of leaders to extend this influence into the future. Through the mass media, the Christian Right also help to spread American soft power abroad. For God's Sake considers the negative impact which this influence is having on the environment, democracy and human rights, and considers how it has manifested itself in US policy towards Israel, Iraq and Iran. Finally, the book examines what the future might hold for the Christian Right's political fortunes in the changing climate of contemporary America.

Investigation of Korean American Relations

Committee on International Relations. Subcommittee on International Organizations. God The studies EU sarase the tracker were nee en Eibe 30 the God زد و ما " [ 40 Ah to kay God 4 e ve Up F Mhes de de tat God is the gated all mankind ...

Investigation of Korean American Relations


Essentials of Cell Biology

I. TYPES OF PROBLEMS A. Aspects of International Relations What does the task of exercising influence in international relations mean for the churches ? In a narrow sense, international relations are direct relations between states as ...

Essentials of Cell Biology


God on Our Side

This timely book offers an accessible introduction to religion in international affairs. Shireen T. Hunter highlights the growing importance of religion in politics and analyzes its nature, role, and significance.

God on Our Side

This timely book offers an accessible introduction to religion in international affairs. Shireen T. Hunter highlights the growing importance of religion in politics and analyzes its nature, role, and significance. She places the question of religion’s impact on global affairs in the broader context of state and nonstate actors, weighing the factors that most affect their actions. Through the lens of three compelling and distinctive case studies—Russia’s response to the Yugoslav crisis, Turkey’s reaction to the Bosnian war, and Europe’s policy toward Turkish membership in the EU—Hunter demonstrates that religion increasingly shapes international affairs in significant and diverse ways. Her book is essential reading for anyone needing a better understanding of why and, more important, how, religion influences the behavior of international actors and thus the character of world politics.

Tragedy and International Relations

In a section of Daybreak entitled 'On great [i.e., international] politics', Nietzsche says that when the ruler ... Lincoln caught this in a paper found in his personal effects after his death: 'The will of God prevails – In great ...

Tragedy and International Relations

Nowhere are clashes between competing ethical perspectives more prevalent than in the realm of International Relations. Thus, understanding tragedy is directly relevant to understanding IR. This volume explores the various ways that tragedy can be used as a lens through which international relations might be brought into clearer focus.

An Introduction to International Relations

accepted point of reference vanished, the death of God became the key dilemma around which modern debates were waged. Yet, instead of accepting the absence of stable foundations and dealing with the ensuing responsibilities, ...

An Introduction to International Relations

Invaluable to students and those approaching the subject for the first time, An Introduction to International Relations, Second Edition provides a comprehensive and stimulating introduction to international relations, its traditions and its changing nature in an era of globalisation. Thoroughly revised and updated, it features chapters written by a range of experts from around the world. It presents a global perspective on the theories, history, developments and debates that shape this dynamic discipline and contemporary world politics. Now in full-colour and accompanied by a password-protected companion website featuring additional chapters and case studies, this is the indispensable guide to the study of international relations.

A Feminist Voyage through International Relations

The ultimate goal of radical revivalists is the Islamization of the international political order—replacing the secular state system and Western-led international institutions with an Islamic system under God's rule.

A Feminist Voyage through International Relations

J. Ann Tickner is ranked among the most influential scholars of international relations. As one of the founders of the field of feminist international relations, she is also among the most pioneering. In many ways her academic career has traced the development of the feminist subfield of IR, and it is no overstatement to say that the field today would look much different without her groundbreaking contributions. A Feminist Voyage through International Relations provides a compendium of Tickner's work as a feminist IR scholar, from the late 1980s through today. The book addresses the issue of methodology in feminist IR and the continuing challenge from traditional IR scholars that feminists don't perform legitimate scientific research. Tickner introduces and contextualizes her previous writings with new essays that trace her intellectual development as a feminist scholar. The chapters consider the introduction of women and gender into the conversation about IR, as well as feminist methodological interventions and conversations with the IR mainstream. The final section of the book includes some of Tickner's later writings on topics including race, imperialism, and religion. She ends with thoughts on the present currents of feminist IR and its place within the wider discipline. Given the way that her career has mirrored the evolution of the subfield, Tickner's book provides a methodological and epistemological story of feminist interventions in IR and a thoughtful reflection on where the field is headed in the future.

Recovering International Relations

Only the full experience of this capacity can bestow upon human affairs faith and hope. ... his own suffering the possibility of suffering altogether, as the Son of God possesses in His own suffering the reality of suffering altogether.

Recovering International Relations

Recovering International Relations bridges two key divides in contemporary IR: between 'value-free' and normative theory, and between reflective, philosophically inflected explorations of ethics in scholarship and close, empirical studies of practical problems in world politics. Featuring a novel, provocative and detailed survey of IR's development over the second half of the twentieth century, the work draws on early Frankfurt School social theory to suggest a new ethical and methodological foundation for the study of world politics-sustainable critique-which draws these disparate approaches together in light of their common aims, and redacts them in the face of their particular limitations. Understanding the discipline as a vocation as well as a series of academic and methodological practices, sustainable critique aims to balance the insights of normative and empirical theory against each other. Each must be brought to bear if scholarship is to meaningfully, and responsibly, address an increasingly dense, heavily armed, and persistently diverse world.

Reinhold Niebuhr and International Relations Theory

... perfection by seeking to make himself God by means of an uncorrupted, freewilling and autonomous Self, he also seeks ... of groups and hence a central concern in international relations and American foreign policy (Thompson 2007).

Reinhold Niebuhr and International Relations Theory

This is the first book in international relations theory entirely devoted to the political thought of Reinhold Niebuhr. Focusing on the existential theology which lies at the basis of Reinhold Niebuhr’s theory of international politics, it highlights the ways in which Niebuhrian realism was not only profoundly theological, but also constituted a powerful existentialist reconfiguration of the Realist tradition going back to Saint Augustine. Guilherme Marques Pedro offers an innovative account of Reinhold Niebuhr’s eclectic thought, branching out into politics, ethics, history, society and religion and laying out a conceptual framework through which his work, as much as the realist tradition of international political thought as a whole, can be read. The book calls for the need to revisit classic thinkers within IR theory with an eye to their interdisciplinary background and as a way to remind ourselves of the issues that were at stake within the field as it was growing in autonomy and diversity – issues which remain, regardless of its disciplinary development, at the core of IR’s concerns. This book offers an important contribution to IR scholarship, revealing the great historical wealth, intellectual originality but also the limitations and paradoxes of one of the greatest American political thinkers of the twentieth century.