Godey s Magazine

Louis Antoine Godey, Sarah Josepha Buell Hale. YOUNG LADIES ' SEMINARY FOR BOARDING AND ... M. A. De Wolfe Howe , D. D. , Louis A. Godey , Esq . , Philadelphia ; Rev. ... Godey s Lady's Book and Arthur's Magazine , one year , $ 3 30 .

Godey s Magazine

Includes music.

Godey s Magazine and Lady s Book

Among other patrons , she refers to the following : - In Philadelphia -- George Cadwallader , Esq . , L. A. Godey , Esq . , S. Brashears , Esq . , Thos . Vanderkemp , Esq . , John Butler , Esq . , M. Fontanges , Esq . , Dr. Thos .

Godey s Magazine and Lady s Book


Godey s Lady s Book

S. Hart & Co. , Charleston , S.C. , have published “ The Charleston Book , " on a plan similar to that of the Baltimore , Boston ... from the presses of the Harpers and the New World publishers ; and all the magazines and periodicals .

Godey s Lady s Book


Seeking a Voice

Many imitations sprung up, and Godey bragged that his magazine was copied as far away as London.8 Throughout the years and changing titles, the intimate tone between the magazine and its "fair readers" defined Godey s publication.

Seeking a Voice

This volume chronicles the media's role in reshaping American life during the tumultuous nineteenth century by focusing specifically on the presentation of race and gender in the newspapers and magazines of the time. The work is divided into four parts: Part I, "Race Reporting," details the various ways in which America's racial minorities were portrayed; Part II, "Fires of Discontent," looks at the moral and religious opposition to slavery by the abolitionist movement and demonstrates how that opposition was echoed by African Americans themselves; Part III, "The Cult of True Womanhood," examines the often disparate ways in which American women were portrayed in the national media as they assumed a greater role in public and private life; and Part IV, "Transcending the Boundaries," traces the lives of pioneering women journalists who sought to alter and expand their gender's participation in American life, showing how the changing role of women led to various journalistic attempts to depict and define women through sensationalistic news coverage of female crime stories.

History of the Mass Media in the United States

(Davis Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) Louis Godey started his magazine in Philadelphia in1830.In1837, he bought Hale«s magazine, combined itwith his, and hiredHale as editor. Godey's Lady's Book became the ...

History of the Mass Media in the United States

First Published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Women s Periodicals in the United States

Most of the nation's leading authors and poets wrote for the journal before the Civil War. Godey 's attracted such nineteenth-century literary women as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Eliza Leslie, Ann Stephens (who later edited Godey's ...

Women s Periodicals in the United States

Consumer magazines aimed at women are as diverse as the market they serve. Some meet the interests of particular age groups; while others target particular racial, ethnic, and economic groups. Some have lasted more than a century, some started only during the last decade, and some have ceased publication after only a few issues. This reference book profiles seventy-five consumer magazines published in the United States and read primarily by women.

A History of American Magazines 1741 1850

28 Never while Mr. Godey lived were the hand - colored plates abandoned for long , though lithographs and other methods of color reproduction were experimented with from time to time . Second only to the colored fashions were the art ...

A History of American Magazines  1741 1850

"The five volumes of A History of American Magazines constitute a unique cultural history of America, viewed through the pages and pictures of her periodicals from the publication of the first monthly magazine in 1741 through the golden age of magazines in the twentieth century"--Page 4 of cover.

Godey s Lady s Book and Magazine

L.A. Godey, S.J. Hale ... Wo do not pay for pnttcrne of embroidery, as we receive more from our foreign magazines, ... Spring and autumn hounets. niutorinls for dresses, jewelry, envelope, hair-work, Woreteds, children's \vnrdro'hca, ...

Godey s Lady s Book and Magazine


Magazines for the Millions

Gender and Commerce in the Ladies' Home Journal and the Saturday Evening Post, 1880-1910 Helen Damon-Moore ... was a member of the primary audience for which Godey's Lady 's Magazine and similar periodicals were produced.25 With its ...

Magazines for the Millions


Manhood and the American Renaissance

On the preeminence of Godey ' s and the taboo against mentioning the war , see Frank Luther Mott , A History of American Magazines , 1741 - 1850 , ( Cambridge : Harvard University Press , 1957 ; 1st pub . 1930 ) , 580 – 594 .

Manhood and the American Renaissance

In the view of David Leverenz, such nineteenth-century American male writers as Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Thoreau, and Whitman were influenced more profoundly by the popular model of the entrepreneurial "man of force" than they were by their literary precursors and contemporaries. Drawing on the insights of feminist theory, gender studies, psychoanalytical criticism, and social history, Manhood and the American Renaissance demonstrates that gender pressures and class conflicts played as critical a role in literary creation for the male writers of nineteenth-century America as they did for the women writers. Leverenz interprets male American authors in terms of three major ideologies of manhood linked to the social classes in the Northeast-patrician, artisan, and entrepreneurial. He asserts that the older ideologies of patrician gentility and of artisan independence were being challenged from 1820 to 1860 by the new middle-class ideology of competitive individualism. The male writers of the American Renaissance, patrician almost without exception in their backgrounds and self-expectations, were fascinated yet horrified by the aggressive materialism and the rivalry for dominance they witnessed in the undeferential "new men." In close readings of the works both of well-known male literary figures and of then popular authors such as Richard Henry Dana, Jr., and Francis Parkman, Leverenz discovers a repressed center of manhood beset by fears of humiliation and masochistic fantasies. He discerns different patterns in the works of Whitman, with his artisan's background, and Frederick Douglass, who rose from artisan freedom to entrepreneurial power. Emphasizing the interplay of class and gender, Leverenz also considers how women viewed manhood. He concludes that male writers portrayed manhood as a rivalry for dominance, but contemporary female writers saw it as patriarchy. Two chapters contrast the work of the genteel writers Sarah Hale and Caroline Kirkland with the evangelical works of Susan Warner and Harriet Beecher Stowe. A bold and imaginative work, Manhood and the American Renaissance will enlighten and inspire controversy among all students of American literature, nineteenth-century American history, and the relation of gender and literature.

Writers of the American Renaissance

"Leaves on the Wayside," Godey's Lady's Book. July-December 1842: 94, 149. "Bud and Blossom." Graham s Magazine. August 1842: 61-3. "The Christian Sisters," The New World extra series No. 27/28. 27 Oct. 1 842: 39-46.

Writers of the American Renaissance

A-Z entries detail the lives, works, and critical reception of more than 70 American writers of the 19th century.

The Best American Humorous Short Stories

... stories may be mentioned The General Court and Jane Andrews' Firkin of Butter (October, 1847, Graham 's Magazine). ... such as Aunt MagWire's Account of Parson Scrantum 's Donation Party (March, 1848, Godey's Lady 's Book) and Aunt ...

The Best American Humorous Short Stories

Although every literary tradition has its own rich vein of humor writing, there's something about American humor that sets it apart from the pack in terms of accessibility and lack of pretension. This volume includes writings from such luminaries of the genre as Mark Twain, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Edgar Allen Poe, and the brevity of most of the collected pieces makes it easy to take a short reading break whenever you could use a good laugh.

The Industrial Book 1840 1880

The publishers of antebellum magazines were often editors as well as owners, and the number of failed periodicals—both newspapers ... Godey 's became in the 1840s the premier national magazine for women, designed to capitalize on the ...

The Industrial Book  1840 1880

V. 1. The colonial book in the Atlantic world: This book carries the interrelated stories of publishing, writing, and reading from the beginning of the colonial period in America up to 1790. v. 2 An Extensive Republic: This volume documents the development of a distinctive culture of print in the new American republic. v. 3. The industrial book 1840-1880: This volume covers the creation, distribution, and uses of print and books in the mid-nineteenth century, when a truly national book trade emerged. v. 4. Print in Motion: In a period characterized by expanding markets, national consolidation, and social upheaval, print culture picked up momentum as the nineteenth century turned into the twentieth. v. 5. The Enduring Book: This volume addresses the economic, social, and cultural shifts affecting print culture from Word War II to the present.

Civil War Recipes

he recipes included here were selected from Godey's Lady's Book in the period of the Civil War, the 1860s, when the magazine was at its zenith. Godey s Lady's Book, perhaps the most popular magazine for women in the nineteenth century, ...

Civil War Recipes

Godey's Lady's Book, perhaps the most popular magazine for women in nineteenth-century America, had a national circulation of 150,000 during the 1860s. The recipes (spelled "receipts") it published were often submitted by women from both the North and the South, and they reveal the wide variety of regional cooking that characterized American culture. There is a remarkable diversity in the recipes, thanks to the largely rural readership of Godey's Lady's Book and to the immigrant influence on the country in the 1860s. Fish and game were readily available in rural America, and the number of seafood recipes testifies to the abundance of the coastal waters and rivers. The country cook was a frugal cook, particularly during wartime, so there are a great many recipes for leftovers and seasonal produce. In addition to a wide sampling of recipes that can be used today, Civil War Recipes includes information on Union and Confederate army rations, cooking on both homefronts, and substitutions used during the war by southern cooks.

A History of American Literature

“An illustrated magazine of entertaining reading. ... GENTLEMAN ' S MAGAZINE , Burton's (1837–1841). A Philadelphia monthly. ... Founded by Louis A. Godey, July, 1830, and managed by him as a monthly until 1877.

A History of American Literature

Reproduction of the original: A History of American Literature by Percy H. Boynton

Fashion and Costume in American Popular Culture

Fashion Service Magazine . 1920-1938 . ... Frank Leslie's Lady's Magazine , v.1-51 , 1857-1882 . Monthly . New York . ... Gentry . 1951-1957 . New York . ULS . Glamour . 1939- . Monthly . New York . Be , Ha , M , ULS . Godey s Ladies ...

Fashion and Costume in American Popular Culture

Provides a convenient and unique look at fashion and costume literature and how it has developed historically. Discusses subjects from jeans to wedding dresses.

Reclaiming Authorship

Godey 's Magazine and Lady 's Book 49 (July 1854): 81—85. “Literary Notices." Harper's New Monthly Magazine 8 (April 1854): 714-17. “Literary Notices.” Knickerbocker; or New York Monthly Magazine 43 (May 1854): 507-17.

Reclaiming Authorship

There was, in the nineteenth century, a distinction made between "writers" and "authors," Susan S. Williams notes, the former defined as those who composed primarily from mere experience or observation rather than from the unique genius or imagination of the latter. If women were more often cast as writers than authors by the literary establishment, there also emerged in magazines, advice books, fictional accounts, and letters a specific model of female authorship, one that valorized "natural" feminine traits such as observation and emphasis on detail, while also representing the distance between amateur writing and professional authorship. Attending to biographical and cultural contexts and offering fresh readings of literary works, Reclaiming Authorship focuses on the complex ways writers such as Maria S. Cummins, Louisa May Alcott, Elizabeth Keckley, Mary Abigail Dodge, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, and Constance Fenimore Woolson put this model of female authorship into practice. Williams shows how it sometimes intersected with prevailing notions of male authorship and sometimes diverged from them, and how it is often precisely those moments of divergence when authorship was reclaimed by women. The current trend to examine "women writers" rather than "authors" marks a full rotation of the circle, and "writers" can indeed be the more capacious term, embracing producers of everything from letters and diaries to published books. Yet certain nineteenth-century women made particular efforts to claim the title "author," Williams demonstrates, and we miss something of significance by ignoring their efforts.

Pettengill s Newspaper Directory and Advertisers Hand book

Such names as MARION HARLAND , INO CHURCHILL , LOUISE S. DORR , METTA VICTORIA VICTOR , S. ANNIE FROST , MRS . DENNISON , MRS . C. A. HOPKINSON , AND OTHERS , Can not be ... GODEY's is the only magazine in which music prepared expressly ...

Pettengill s Newspaper Directory and Advertisers  Hand book


Gender and Activism in a Little Magazine

“The Bachelor Girl's Soliloquy.” Lippincott's Monthly Magazine, September, 1906, 385. Anonymous. “The Bachelor-Maid.” Godey's Magazine, December, 1895, 670. Anonymous. “Eugenics and Economics.” Masses (1914): 21. Bibliography.

Gender and Activism in a Little Magazine

Interweaving nuanced discussions of politics, visuality, and gender, Gender and Activism in a Little Magazine uncovers the complex ways that gender figures into the graphic satire created by artists for the New York City-based socialist journal, the Masses. This exceptional magazine was published between 1911 and 1917, during an unusually radical decade in American history, and featured cartoons drawn by artists of the Ashcan School and others, addressing questions of politics, gender, labor and class. Rather than viewing art from the Masses primarily in terms of its critical social stances or aesthetic choices, however, this study uses these images to open up new ways of understanding the complexity of early 20th-century viewpoints. By focusing on the activist images found in the Masses and studying their unique perspective on American modernity, Rachel Schreiber also returns these often-ignored images to their rightful place in the scholarship on American modernism. This book demonstrates that the centrality of the Masses artists' commitments to gender and class equality is itself a characterization of the importance of these issues for American moderns. Despite their alarmingly regular reliance on gender stereotypes?and regardless of any assessment of the efficacy of the artists' activism?the graphic satire of the Masses offers invaluable insights into the workings of gender and the role of images in activist practices at the beginning of the last century.