Going Back to Bisbee

Tombstone where they ran laundries and bath houses , and a good many were quite successful just across the Mexican border where they grew vegetable gardens , no Chinese were allowed to settle in Bisbee . In fact , tradition has it that ...

Going Back to Bisbee

The author shares his fascination with a distinctive corner of the country--Bisbee, Arizona--with a narrative that reflects the history of the area, the beauty of the landscape, and his own life

America s Most Haunted Hotels

Bisbee and Jerome both feel as though you are one large clap of lightning away from either being transported back in time or ... Richard Shelton points out in Going Back to Bisbee that there are an unknown amount of unidentified graves and.

America s Most Haunted Hotels

Phantom footsteps pace the stairs at the Myrtles Plantation. A seductive spirit tugs on the sheets at the Copper Queen. Ghost children whisper and giggle at the Kehoe House. Journey into the mysterious world of haunted hotels, where uninvited guests roam the halls, supernatural sounds ring throughout the rooms, and chills run along the spines of those who dare to check in for the night. Join Jamie Davis Whitmer, author of Haunted Asylums, Prisons, and Sanatoriums, as she explores some of the most haunted hotels across the United States. From the Jerome Grand Hotel in Arizona to the Palmer House in Minnesota, each hotel is discussed in great detail, covering everything from the building’s history and legends to first-hand accounts of spooky sounds and smells, ghost sightings, EVP sessions, and more. You’ll also find photos, travel information, and everything else you need to plan your own visit to these iconic hotels.

The Bisbee Massacre

One of the men outside Castaneda's yelled at him, “Go back, go back, you son-of-a-bitch.” Kelly stated, “I fell back and just then I felt a bullet whiz past my nose.” Kelly remembered seeing Smith about three quarters of an hour before ...

The Bisbee Massacre

In December 1883, five outlaws attempted to rob the A.A. Castaneda Mercantile establishment in the fledgling mining town of Bisbee in the Arizona Territory. The robbery was a disaster: four citizens shot dead, one a pregnant woman. The failed heist was national news, with the subsequent manhunt, trial and execution of the alleged perpetrators followed by newspapers from New York to San Francisco. The Bisbee Massacre was as momentous as the infamous blood feud between the Earp brothers and the cowboys two years earlier, and led to the only recorded lynching in the town of Tombstone--John Heath, a sporting man, who was thought to be the mastermind. New research indicates he may have been innocent. This comprehensive history takes a fresh look at the event that marked the end of the Wild West period in the Arizona Territory.

Undermining Race

Shelton, Going Back to Bisbee. 30. Coggin, “Roots of the Calumet.” 31. Cited in Ibid.; McKinney, Ned White, 57–58. 32. Nasaw, The Chief. 33. Evans, “Yanquis vs. Yaquis,” 363. 34. Truett, Fugitive Landscapes, 58–59. 35. Ibid., 80–81. 36.

Undermining Race

Undermining Race rewrites the history of race, immigration, and labor in the copper industry in Arizona. The book focuses on the case of Italian immigrants in their relationships with Anglo, Mexican, and Spanish miners (and at times with blacks, Asian Americans, and Native Americans), requiring a reinterpretation of the way race was formed and figured across place and time. Phylis Martinelli argues that the case of Italians in Arizona provides insight into “in between” racial and ethnic categories, demonstrating that the categorizing of Italians varied from camp to camp depending on local conditions—such as management practices in structuring labor markets and workers’ housing, and the choices made by immigrants in forging communities of language and mutual support. Italians—even light-skinned northern Italians—were not considered completely “white” in Arizona at this historical moment, yet neither were they consistently racialized as non-white, and tactics used to control them ranged from micro to macro level violence. To make her argument, Martinelli looks closely at two “white camps” in Globe and Bisbee and at the Mexican camp of Clifton-Morenci. Comparing and contrasting the placement of Italians in these three camps shows how the usual binary system of race relations became complicated, which in turn affected the existing race-based labor hierarchy, especially during strikes. The book provides additional case studies to argue that the biracial stratification system in the United States was in fact triracial at times. According to Martinelli, this system determined the nature of the associations among laborers as well as the way Americans came to construct “whiteness.”

Getting Over the Color Green

Richard Shelton FROM GOING BACK TO BISBEE The clouds are developing dark centers now . It begins to look promising for a storm . And the temperature seems to have dropped a degree or two . The country gets greener and greener ...

Getting Over the Color Green

An eclectic anthology of contemporary nature writing from the Southwest, including nonfiction, fiction, field notes, and poetry, through which artists of diverse backgrounds both celebrate and illuminate the vitality and complexity of southwestern nature and literature.

Early Bisbee

After miles of tracking with two men, Daniels was confident he knew the Apaches were camped near Bisbee and decided to go back to get an armed group of men. However, without knowing, Apache scouts had been following them.

Early Bisbee

Before Bisbee became a bustling mining camp, it was a haven to Native Americans for centuries. However, their presence brought the intrusion of army scouts and prospectors into the Mule Mountains. The coincidental discovery of vast mineral wealth at the future site of Bisbee permanently affixed the fate of the land forever. Rising from the remote desert was a dynamic mining city, a city that grew into one of the most influential communities in the West. Bisbee was unique in the Old West because of the mixed moral values. High society and the decadent underworld lived in a delicate balance, but a vibrant multicultural community was forged from these social fires.

Vincent in Tucson

They needed to go back to the main cattle herd to get more men to haul out the bags. When Silverman and Stone got back to Bisbee, they were told Sheriff Slaughter was in Benson. A telegram describing the massacre and the jewelry and ...

Vincent in Tucson

The compilation of this writing in a fictional format was my way of conveying the unquestionable appeal equally to those who are already familiar with Van Gogh as well as to those with less knowledge of art and history. I was always faced with the challenge of finding new ways to inspire my students as a high school art teacher. One way that seemed to work most often was adding some type of adventure to the subject at hand. I invite you to explore the larger-than-life characters from Arizona and Europe from the late 1800s that I have woven into this fictional adventure. Reviews An adventure from beginning to end! Steven has captured the beauty and spirit of the Old Pueblo, its surrounding areas, and what makes it southwest such a treasure. The characters are what make the journey so believable. Well done! (Andy Bastine). I found, while reading Vincent in Tucson, an amazing connection between the historical perspective of his work and a fictional story that connected me to a life (Don Brown; deputy superintendent, Arizona Department of Education). More than a story, its a journey into two artists mindsVincent and the author. It takes a what-if story to a did-it story. You will crave to know more about Vincents life and death (Jodi Smith, art aficionado). Only a very talented artist and teacher could possibly create this fascinating fictional account of Vincent van Goghs time in Tucson, Arizona (Gary Bruner, PhD; retired superintendent, Bend, Oregon public schools). By any standard, one would have to say that, this time, Bye has come up with a doozy (J. C. Martin, Arizona Daily Star book reviewer).

The Big Gundown

There's still time enough for you to go out there where those outlaws ambushed us and try to pick up their trail.” Bateman nodded. “Yes, sir. Hadn't I better leave some men here to ride guard on the train when it goes back to Bisbee?

The Big Gundown

The Loner intends to see justice served--until he realizes the line between good and evil is often blurred. Vengeance Is A Dangerous Game. . . Using an old cannon that once belonged to Napoleon's army, an outlaw gang has been bringing trains to a halt and then robbing them. Now Edward Sheffield--one of the owners of the railroad--wants to hire Conrad Morgan, known as The Loner, to wipe the gang off the map. The Loner isn't interested, especially when Sheffield's hot-blooded wife tries to seduce him into going after the gang's leader, Gideon Black--a renegade ex-colonel-turned-outlaw. But when the gang turns their big gun on a town, killing several innocent people, The Loner has to choose sides. The best way to take them out? Become one of them. And that's when The Loner uncovers some unsavory secrets--and finds himself caught between the middle of two ruthless forces. . .

64 25 30 2011

Phoenix College Library, Phoenix, Arizona, USA “Serbian Ready for Their Night in Belgrade.” Bisbee People, August 20, 1980. Travis, B. “Serbian Community Goes Back to Earliest Days.” Bisbee Magazine, Spring 1988, 5.

                                                                                                        64                                           25 30                     2011


Under the Iron Heel

The deportees' threat to return to Bisbee en masse went unfulfilled. And those who did go back without permission were arrested for vagrancy, brought before a secret court set up by Wheeler, and run out of town under threat.

Under the Iron Heel

"In 1917, the Industrial Workers of the World was rapidly gaining strength and members. Within a decade, this radical union was effectively destroyed, the victim of the most remarkable campaign of legal repression and vigilantism in American history. Under the Iron Heel is the first comprehensive account of this campaign. Founded in 1905, the IWW offered to the millions of workers aggrieved by industrial capitalism a radical and militant program that drew them into the union's ranks in great numbers. But its growth, coinciding with World War I and the Russian Revolution, was seen by powerful capitalists and government officials as an existential threat and it had to be stopped. In Under the Iron Heel, Ahmed White documents the torrent of legal persecution and extralegal, sometimes lethal violence that shattered the IWW. In so doing, he reveals the remarkable courage of those who faced this campaign, uncovers the origins of the profoundly unequal and conflicted nation we know today, and lays bare disturbing truths about the law, political repression, and the limits of free speech and association in class society"--

Haunted Bisbee

He sat back down and saw the shadow go back and forth a few more times. The window in the door is obscured glass, so he couldn't clearly see who it might have been—only the haze of a bodily figure passed by. In the Writing Room, ...

Haunted Bisbee

Once the world's richest mining site, Bisbee is now one of the most haunted towns in America. From an entity that screams in anguish in Zacatecas Canyon to the glorious woman that floats through a wall in the School House Inn, spirits lurk around every corner. A firefighter still haunts his beloved Bisbee Fire Station No. 2, saving lives even after death, while a vengeful apparition keeps guard over his family plot at Evergreen Cemetery. Copper mining might have faded, but the memories of those drawn to Bisbee live on. Join Francine Powers, award-winning journalist, author and paranormal historian, as she uncovers the truth behind the old ghost stories of her beloved hometown.

The Well

Bisbee closed his mouth and let the air fill his nostrils. ... He looked back up Ascending Hill and at the top of it sat Marnin, smiling. Bisbee looked around for ... Most simply turn around, and go back to Harness.” Bisbee looked ...

The Well

Buried in the darkness of his small third story sitting room, driven to the edge of despair, Bisbee is faced with a life altering decision. Faced by the nightly terror of mysterious Beasts, he knows his only hope is Charis. The letters that lay scattered on the floor next to him tell of a Well in Charis that holds the secret of life. But the Well also involves a death that terrifies Bisbee almost as much as the Beasts that are tormenting him. This book is the story of that journey. It is about the dangers that Bisbee faces and the lessons he learns about himself and his Master. Most of all, it is about what he discovers at the Well of Chayah.

Early Danish Pioneers Southern Arizona Territorial Days

teaching 45 years in the Bisbee schools and a beloved major character in Richard Shelton's Going Back to Bisbee. Catherine (known as Kate) died February 15, 1938 and Jokum died May 18, 1942. For many years the descendants of Jokum and ...

Early Danish Pioneers  Southern Arizona Territorial Days

"Early Danish Pioneers: Southern Arizona Territorial Days" is an account of the Viking spirt that brought many Danes who were miners, soldiers, ranchers, business men, railroaders and community builders to southern Arizona. Their hard-scrabble living is riveting t and their trials of treking over this unforgiving terrain of the Sonoran Desert. Researchers, geneologists and historians find these stories provide a vivid picture of the Wild West.

Crime Fiction and Film in the Southwest

In a “ coupla years , ” she says , she plans to go back to Bisbee and open a dress shop . After all , the girls in Bisbee " need a little glamor . ” At the end of the movie we see her in a perky yellow sundress , ready to drive back ...

Crime Fiction and Film in the Southwest

When Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee, Tony Hillerman s oddly matched tribal police officers, patrol the mesas and canyons of their Navajo reservation, they join a rich traditon of Southwestern detectives. In Crime Fiction and Film in the Southwest, a group of literary critics tracks the mystery and crime novel from the Painted Desert to Death Valley and Salt Lake City. In addition, the book includes the first comprehensive bibliography of mysteries set in the Southwest and a chapter on Southwest film noir from Humphrey Bogart s tough hood in The Petrified Forest to Russell Crowe s hard-nosed cop in L.A. Confidential. "

Making a Modern U S West

“We are rearing to go back to Bisbee but not until the soldiers go along to protect us. ... 40 Ironically, these men, so despised for their presumed disloyalty by Bisbee's Citizens' Protective League, rejected the notion of a prayer for ...

Making a Modern U S  West

To many Americans in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the West was simultaneously the greatest symbol of American opportunity, the greatest story of its history, and the imagined blank slate on which the country’s future would be written. From the Spanish-American War in 1898 to the Great Depression’s end, from the Mississippi to the Pacific, policymakers at various levels and large-scale corporate investors, along with those living in the West and its borderlands, struggled over who would define modernity, who would participate in the modern American West, and who would be excluded. In Making a Modern U.S. West Sarah Deutsch surveys the history of the U.S. West from 1898 to 1940. Centering what is often relegated to the margins in histories of the region—the flows of people, capital, and ideas across borders—Deutsch attends to the region’s role in constructing U.S. racial formations and argues that the West as a region was as important as the South in constructing the United States as a “white man’s country.” While this racial formation was linked to claims of modernity and progress by powerful players, Deutsch shows that visions of what constituted modernity were deeply contested by others. This expansive volume presents the most thorough examination to date of the American West from the late 1890s to the eve of World War II.

Borderland Barons

Naco had a tarnished history of violence associated with trafficking drugs, returning import of guns and cash as well as illegal crossings. Bisbee's a quirky ... She has more tolerance for some of the shenanigans coming out of Bisbee.

Borderland Barons

Young Luis Beltran strained under the load of the heavy bundle of marijuana strapped to his back as he ducked under the border fence at Naco, Mexico. He planned to head north, across the Arizona desert to deliver the contraband package and collect five thousand dollars as promised him. Luis had seen others earn streams of cash from the flood of drug trade cash flowing through his village. He intended to collect for this one delivery, and escape the poverty of the borderland with his mother and older sister. The journey Luis begins with his first step into Arizona propels him into unknown territory and unexpected future.

No Mercy

Right now nothing mattered but going back to Bisbee and being with her old friends as they said goodbye to Nate. Her mind jumped to what she had run away from as a teenager and she shuddered and opened her eyes. As far as she knew, ...

No Mercy

Run Over twenty years ago, when she was just a teenager, Belle ran from everything she knew to escape her abusive stepfather. She left behind the boy she loved and a much-loved circle of friends. Even if Dylan could begin to forgive her, what she has kept hidden from him could still ruin any future she might have with him. The secret hangs over her head while she falls in love with him all over again. Reunion Dylan has never gotten over Belle running away all those years ago. When Nate, one of their Circle of Seven childhood friends, is found dead, Belle and Dylan are drawn back together. It’s not long before he realizes he has a second chance to make her his. Resolve When a dangerous drug cartel starts targeting the Circle of Seven friends, Dylan must use all his federal law enforcement training and contacts to stay one step ahead of the cartel. He must solve the clues Nate left behind before all of them end up dead.

Boom Bust Boom

... 179, 203 glaciers, 127, 131, 141, 211–12, 215 Going Back to Bisbee (Shelton), 219 gold, 97, 116, 117, 141, 179, 233, 242 and copper, 72, 123, 139, 202, 212 gold mining, 4, 12, 13, 16, 26, 33, 40, 43, 72, 86, 87, 165, 199, 200, 207, ...

Boom  Bust  Boom

A sweeping account of civilization's dependence on copper traces the industry's history, culture and economics while exploring such topics as the dangers posed to communities living near mines, its ubiquitous use in electronics and the activities of the London Metal Exchange. By the author of Fools Rush In. 30,000 first printing.

Hidden Prey

Right now nothing mattered but going back to Bisbee and being with her old friends as they said goodbye to Nate. Her mind jumped to what she had run away from as a teenager and she shuddered and opened her eyes. As far as she knew, ...

Hidden Prey

New York Times bestselling author Cheyenne McCray delivers steamy romantic suspense with a high-octane thriller about a woman running from a Mexican cartel and the man determined to protect her. Danger Tori Cox, a talented and sought-after musician, heads back to her roots to a small southwest town in Arizona as she flees an abusive relationship. When she arrives she witnesses the execution of a federal agent by the head of the Jimenez Cartel. The drug cartel kingpin orders his men to kill Tori before she can testify. Desire Landon Walker, a special agent with the Department of Homeland Security, rescues Tori from members of one of the most ruthless cartels in the world. He sets out to protect her, but soon protecting her isn’t enough. The fire between them makes him want her in a way that he’s never wanted another woman, despite his wounded heart. Death Diego Montego Jimenez will do everything in his power to kill Tori, the young American woman, who threatens his business and family. No one lives to testify against the Jimenez Cartel.

So You Wanna Be a Legend So Did I

I like this guy! was the first thought that went through my mind. Coach Kush said he recognized me as I walked through the door because I looked just like a “Bisbee hard-rock miner. ... He said, “Don't ever go back to the mines!

So You Wanna Be a Legend  So Did I

Do you know what it takes to be a great teacher-coach? Hadley Hicks knows. He was mentored by five collegiate Hall of Fame coaches, he was a teammate of well known professional football players on a National Championship military team. He even had a ''cup of coffee'' in professional baseball. Hadley was successful as a high school and college coach. Yet, he never reached the greatness he felt was due him. Hadley Hicks shares his heart in his search for significance. His poignant, humorous, and down to earth writing style makes an enjoyable read. He is candid in his heartbreaks, the sin of divorce and the death of his eldest son. He survived a parental petition for his dismissal as football coach. He livened up his teaching experiences with an accidental shooting and a premeditated murder. He kept his fellow faculty alert with numerous practical jokes. Among student-athletes he mentored was a Cy Young Award winner and three professional football players. Hadley's marriage to a Godly woman who is his spiritual teammate, provided impetus for finding eternal significance in a relationship with Jesus Christ.