Going with the Boys

He'd known two of the boys, but both had died, and, if others had been at Buchenwald, he doubted their chances of ... 'I was rewarded by a wonderfully peaceful smile,' she wrote, 'as he let go of my hand and sank back on his bunk.

Going with the Boys

On the front lines of the Second World War, a contingent of female journalists were bravely waging their own battle. Barred from combat zones and faced with entrenched prejudice and bureaucratic restrictions, these women were forced to fight for the right to work on equal terms as men. Going with the Boys follows six remarkable women as their lives and careers intertwined: Martha Gellhorn, who out-scooped her husband Ernest Hemingway on D-Day by traveling to Normandy as a stowaway on a hospital ship; Lee Miller, who went from being a Vogue cover model to the magazine’s official war correspondent; Sigrid Schultz, who hid her Jewish identity and risked her life by reporting on the Nazi regime; Virginia Cowles, a 'society girl columnist' turned combat reporter; Clare Hollingworth, the first journalist to report the outbreak of war; and Helen Kirkpatrick, the first woman to report from an Allied war zone with equal privileges to men. This intricately layered account captures both the adversity and the vibrancy of the women’s lives as they chased down sources and narrowly dodged gunfire, as they mixed with artists and politicians like Picasso, Cocteau, and Churchill, and conducted their own tumultuous love affairs. In her gripping, intimate, and nuanced portrait, Judith Mackrell celebrates these courageous reporters who risked their lives for a story and who changed the rules of war reporting for ever.

Cover Me Boys I m Going In

nice folks at ESPN2 agreed to let me come to Bristol, work for a few weeks and then, almost immediately, take a week or so off to go to Hawaii for my final Skins Game telecast. While we were still in LA, it was my job to find footage, ...

Cover Me Boys  I m Going In

Growing up in the shadow of one of network affiliate television’s groundbreakers, Keith Hirshland was destined to follow in his father’s footsteps. In this gripping new memoir, readers will follow Hirshland’s stories as he witnesses the creation of sports networks and works alongside the legends of broadcasting. With a career that spans more than thirty years, Hirshland has seen it all. From the meteoric rise of Tiger Woods to the Kelly Tilghman “lynching” controversy and countless stories from the incredibly successful SKINS GAME golf franchise, his amazing stories provide a behind-the-scenes look into one of the most revered industries in the world. Cover Me Boys, I’m Going In: Tales of the Tube from a Broadcast Brat gives readers an informative, reflective, and often humorous look at live television from both in front of and behind the camera. Offering an insider’s look at the television industry as well as the creation of two sports networks, this gripping memoir’s stories include some of the most famous athletes and broadcasters in the world. With a behind-the-scenes look into sports television that few will ever experience, this exciting memoir gives readers a priceless glimpse into one of the nation’s most coveted industries. The first book to document the creation of the Golf Channel, Cover Me Boys, I’m Going In is a unique memoir that covers a number of fascinating industry moments. Covering the Golf Channel as well as the earliest days of ESPN2, these wonderful stories are packed with the larger-than-life personalities that made these sport networks successful. Inspired by his parents’ death, Hirshland wanted to document as much as possible about his professional life. After having led an interesting and unique life, he wanted to find a way to honor his parents while passing his stories down to his children. A mesmerizing read for anyone interested in sports, television, or “behind the scenes” stories in general, Cover Me Boys, I’m Going In is sure to hook readers from the very beginning. With its eclectic mix of playful, humorous, and dramatic stories, this excellent collection is truly the entertaining, informative, and enlightening book that readers have been waiting for.

Boy and Going Solo

One day, I told myself, one glorious day I will have a bike like that and I will wear long trousers with bicycleclips and my school cap will sit jaunty on my head and I will go whizzing down the hill pedalling backwards with no hands on ...

Boy and Going Solo

Boy and Going Solo is the whole of Roald Dahl's extraordinary autobiography in one volume. Roald Dahl wasn't always a writer. Once he was just a schoolboy. Have you ever wondered what he was like growing up? In BOY you'll find out why he and his friends took revenge on the beastly Mrs Pratchett who ran the sweet shop. He remembers what it was like taste-testing chocolate for Cadbury's and he even reveals how his nose was nearly sliced off. Then in GOING SOLO you'll read stories of whizzing through the air in a Tiger Moth Plane, encounters with hungry lions, and the terrible crash that led him to storytelling. Roald Dahl tells his story in his own words - and it's all TRUE. And now you can listen to all of Roald Dahl's novels for children on Roald Dahl Audiobooks read by some very famous voices, including Kate Winslet, David Walliams and Steven Fry - plus there are added squelchy soundeffects from Pinewood Studios! Also look out for new Roald Dahl apps in the App store and Google Play- including the disgusting TWIT OR MISS! and HOUSE OF TWITS inspired by the revolting Twits.

If This Is Heaven I Am Going to Be a Good Boy

Boys shared a large bedroom lined with cots and bunk beds, and girls shared the other bedroom. The children were not allowed to wear shoes unless they were going to school or to church. They would walk to the Franklin Avenue School for ...

If This Is Heaven  I Am Going to Be a Good Boy

With a bridge in Boston and a bench in Falmouth dedicated to him, Tommy Leonard has been widely recognized for his many acts of charity and his avid promotion of health and fitness. The journey this affable Irishman took on his way to becoming one of Boston's most personable bartenders and the founder of the Falmouth Road Race began the day his father left him at a mission for children of the destitute at age six.Author Kathleen Cleary recounts the struggles, disappointments, heartbreaks, and humor of Tommy's childhood and teen years. She also shares the sometimes painful and comical stories of his young adulthood. Tommy's remarkable life transformed every corner of the world it touched, whether the corner of Massachusetts Avenue and Commonwealth Avenue in Boston, the roads of Fukuoka, Japan, the bayous of Houston, or somewhere between two pubs in Woods Hole and Falmouth on Cape Cod.Tommy Leonard's heartwarming story will teach you that in following your dreams, embracing the positive will make all the difference.A percentage of the sale of this book will be contributed to a retirement trust for Tommy.

What Is That Boy Going to Do Next

“Come on Mama let's go to the show,” I'd say to her at times. And off we'd go on the streetcar down Finney Avenue to the Comet Theater. And I sometimes took her to the candy shop where the clerk asked if we were sister and brother.

What Is That Boy Going to Do Next

What Is That Boy Going To Do Next? is a story about a maverick, a nonconforming teenager, with an insatiable curiosity about the world of diverse people, places and ideas.It is also a tale of a teenager's tough-loving mom and the tension it causes, a strict dad incapable of taking care of business because of addiction to alcohol, a generously loving stepmom whose support is transformative, and a brother practicing his version of sibling rivalry.At age 14, the boy flees a monotonous life in St. Louis. And after a long and circuitous journey that includes living in Bainbridge (Maryland), Boston, San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego and traveling in the Pacific and the Far East to places such as Honolulu, Guam, Okinawa, Samar Island, Manila, Shanghai, Tsingtao, Tokyo and Yokosuka-at age 19, he finally settles in New York City-where as an adult he becomes an accomplished and multifaceted educator.

Going Public

Then we all sit down ina circle,men interspersed with boys. We go around, and each man says, “Here'sthe bookI've read that I totally like, and here'swhy.” He talks for about five minutes. The boys listen intently.

Going Public

"Greater is he who is in you than he who is in the world" (1 John 4:4). Taking this verse at face value provides the perfect opportunity to prove it in the educational setting of our children, say the authors of Going Public. By nurturing the life and power of Christ within them, students will be ready to stand against negative influences no matter the environment, even bringing light to a dark place. They will also benefit from many of the services that the public school system has to offer. Readers of this practical guide will learn how moms and dads have a strategic role to play in the ongoing development of their school-age children. Discover what the Bible says about education, the three most important things to teach your public-school child, how to shape your child through teachable moments, the importance of getting involved at school, and why everyone should homeschool in addition to public school.

Family Where Are We Going

Then Florien and my younger brother AC wanted to go and beat up the other boys. My parents intervened and stopped the whole matter. They talked to us about our potential results if we carried out our desires. My wounds soon healed, ...

Family Where Are We Going

This book may be typical of many African American families. This book goes back to the early 19th century to contemporary times. It touches on some of the high social and emotional involvement of family members. It gives some hint of events in two of this country's 20th century international conflicts.

Colloquial Breton

It's as if you were saying, e.g. 'The boys, they aren't going . . .' Without emphasis we have: Emañ ar paotr o vont . . . and emañ ar baotred o vont . . . The boy is going . . . and the boys are going . . . (and negatively N'emañ ket ar ...

Colloquial Breton

Colloquial Breton: The Complete Course for Beginners has been carefully developed by an experienced teacher to provide a step-by-step course to Breton as it is written and spoken today. Combining a clear, practical and accessible style with a methodical and thorough treatment of the language, it equips learners with the essential skills needed to communicate confidently and effectively in Breton in a broad range of situations. No prior knowledge of the language is required. Colloquial Breton is exceptional; each unit presents a wealth of grammatical points that are reinforced with a wide range of exercises for regular practice. A full answer key, a grammar summary, bilingual glossaries and English translations of dialogues can be found at the back as well as useful vocabulary lists throughout. Key features include: A clear, user-friendly format designed to help learners progressively build up their speaking, listening, reading and writing skills Jargon-free, succinct and clearly structured explanations of grammar An extensive range of focused and dynamic supportive exercises Realistic and entertaining dialogues covering a broad variety of narrative situations Helpful cultural points An overview of the sounds of Breton Balanced, comprehensive and rewarding, Colloquial Breton is an indispensable resource both for independent learners and students taking courses in Breton. Audio material to accompany the course is available to download free in MP3 format from www.routledge.com/cw/colloquials. Recorded by native speakers, the audio material features the dialogues and texts from the book and will help develop your listening and pronunciation skills.

Going Beyond Vaiku ha

2.4.164 After stealing the cowherd boys and calves, BrahmŒj” experienced how K ̈§Ãa is simultaneously one and millions. Eko bahu syŒm: K ̈§Ãa is one and becomes many, yet becoming many still remains one. First BrahmŒ saw, ÒHere K ̈§Ãa ...

Going Beyond Vaiku      ha

A collection of lectures delivered in 1991.

Church Going Gone

We still had an all-male choir of men and boys. As parish church choirs go, they sang well, and what would choral evensong have been without them? Several of the men had been Oxbridge choral scholars and could easily have been lay ...

Church Going Gone

In this colourful memoir, from 1950’s childhood to the COVID crisis, Brian Mountford describes his life as a priest, which has spanned a period of immense social change and seen the secularisation of Britain to the point where 52% of the population say they have ‘no religion’. Opening with a vibrant account of London in the Sixties, he moves to Cambridge college life in the Seventies, Suburbia in the Eighties, and thirty years as Vicar of the ‘most visited parish church in England’, the University Church, Oxford. Rich in humour and anecdote, he unpacks his liberal theological ideas on the way, addressing questions such as God, the meaning of life, sexual ethics, and the relationship between doubt and faith. A central idea is that the abandonment of organised religion has not eradicated spiritual questioning and, following Philip Larkin’s poem Church Going, from which the book takes its title, people of all ages are forever ‘surprising/A hunger in (themselves) to be more serious.’ Both the story and the essay content will fascinate many, many more people than actually go to church.

Truancy Among School going Boys

Other problems , not mentioned here , go to show that the teachers have become great problems in themselves . Powerful gangs of students have emerged and are emerging in these institutions . They are becoming increasingly serious ...

Truancy Among School going Boys


Raising Children Without Going Insane

Second, Ashley and I have committed to making church fun for our boys. We are often the last ones to leave the church building after each service, so we have allowed the boys to go to Ashley's office while they are waiting for us.

Raising Children Without Going Insane

Imagine raising two teenagers and a newborn baby, working full-time as a motivational speaker, teacher, and pastor--all at the same time! This hilarious and heart-warming book opens an amazing window into the arena of parenting. You will laugh and you will cry, but most of all, the hope that you feel as you read the pages of this book will encourage, inspire, and motivate you. It's not a manual of quick fixes, clichéd answers, and packaged solutions. It's an insightful, humorous, and honest account from a mother who's been there and back and lived to tell the tale. As you indulge yourself in this delightful book, you will come to realize that parenting is an adventure with few rules and a whole lot of trial and error. You will discover that the answers to parenting are found in the most unlikely of places and that the parent your children need is already inside of you just waiting to be set free.

Ain t Going Back to No Cotton Patch

The Thomas boys had been picking peaches and getting them ready to send to town. That afternoon they were ... The twins saw where they were going and came back a hollering the Swan girls are a heading for the blue hole. Boy they throwed ...

Ain t Going Back to No Cotton Patch

Fast cars, law men, moonshine, romance in the cotton fields, and wild cat whiskey! It was Garden City, Alabama the spring of 1946. Boys were coming home. World War II was over. Many mothers were learning that their sons would not be coming home. Garden City was beginning to settle back in to a nice easy routine. Mr. Sam the local merchant was getting in his sugar orders for the season. The farmers were looking for good crops, and the moonshiners, were looking forward to make good on their orders. A certain revenuer from DC was poking around town. He was trying his best to find out about this "special shine" that everyone was talking about. Cracker Black, the brains behind the operation has a 50 gallon pot making moonshine for a local man named Hollis. Now Hollis is a nefarious character ran several juke joints out on 78 hwy on the strip. When word got round to Cracker his shine was wanted in Memphis and St Louis he had to ramp up the production. He hires two black fellers Big George and Little Willie right out the cotton patch. They are able to work at night in the woods and not be seen by the law because of them being black. When the sleepy little town's folk turn off their lights for the night, the moonshiners go to work making that good old Alabama Shine. Life was good, again.....

Going Home

What boy?' 'Just before the ceremony was about to begin one of my assistants was making a check that everything was ... Let's go!' 'Where to?' 'To pick up the Kohinoor.' At a dump site two twelve—year—old boys brought them to some huge ...

Going Home

In his first collection of short stories, author Bill Mooney presents a journey through the minds of complex characters seeking life change amid turmoil and shares a window into the foundation of what creates a simple life: love, commitment, and self-discovery. In "Eddie Masters Down Under," Eddie Masters is stuck in Australia, living the life of a drifter and awaiting funds to get back to the States. But when he is offered a tempting proposition, Eddie is faced with a tough decision. "Hunting the Kohinoor" introduces Walt and Abbey St. George, an attractive married couple who once had lofty dreams and goals, but now live a humdrum life in a Philadelphia suburb. But when a renowned jewel goes missing, the St. Georges decide to go hunting for the diamond worth millions of dollars, sending them on an adventure halfway across the world. In "Going Home," newspaper reporter Willie Cole, who has just finished writing the obituary for his friend and co-worker, has no idea his life is about to take a dramatic turn. Going Home is a poignant collection of engaging novellas and short tales that, through the unforgettable experiences of its diverse characters, share the important message that choices inevitably lead to destinies.

Going to the Palais

Richard Hoggart's 1957 Uses of Literacy famously berated the new 'Juke Box Boys' of the period as passive, feminized, and impotent ciphers of a new Americanized mass culture. These 'new men' were attacked from all sides.

Going to the Palais

From the mid-1920s, the dance hall occupied a pivotal place in the culture of working- and lower-middle-class communities in Britain - a place rivalled only by the cinema and eventually to eclipse even that institution in popularity. Going to the Palais examines the history of this vital social and cultural institution, exploring the dances, dancers, and dance venues that were at the heart of one of twentieth-century Britain's most significant leisure activities. Going to the Palais has several key focuses. First, it explores the expansion of the dance hall industry and the development of a 'mass audience' for dancing between 1918 and 1960. Second, the impact of these changes on individuals and communities is examined, with a particular concentration on working and lower-middle-class communities, and on young men and women. Third, the cultural impact of dancing and dance halls is explored. A key aspect of this debate is an examination of how Britain's dance culture held up against various standardizing processes (commercialization, Americanization, etc.) over the period, and whether we can see the emergence of a 'national' dance culture. Finally, the volume offers an assessment of wider reactions to dance halls and dancing in the period. Going to the Palais is concerned with the complex relationship between discourses of class, culture, gender, and national identity and how they overlap - how cultural change, itself a response to broader political, social, and economic developments, was helping to change notions of class, gender, and national identity.

Free Range Kids How to Raise Safe Self Reliant Children Without Going Nuts with Worry

“Where will you go?” Francisco asked me. “I don't know,” I said, “somewhere.” He thought awhile and then he said, “I will go, too.” The boys ended up in a seaside village where a fisherman named Ciguciano took them in.

Free Range Kids  How to Raise Safe  Self Reliant Children  Without Going Nuts with Worry

Examines the dangers that parents fear for their children and offers advice on how to raise safe, independent children.

I m Taking My Eggs and Going Home

I pictured my house with these two boys in it and I felt that wave of maternal love flow over me again. ... He'd have plans to go to UCLA on a basketball scholarship, but he'd be studying fine arts, as we'd been told he had talent.

I   m Taking My Eggs and Going Home

Lisa Manterfield was a sensible 32-year-old when she met The One—a man who sparked a passion for tango, an urge to break down closed doors, and a deep-rooted desire to reproduce. Five years later she was a baby addict, hiding her addiction, plotting a maternity ward heist, and threatening anything that got in her way, including her beloved husband and his pesky practicality. In this gritty, award-winning memoir, Manterfield traces her spiraling route from rational 21st-century woman to desperate mama-wannabe. She examines the siren song of motherhood, the insidious lure of the fertility industry, and the repercussions of being childless in a mom-centric society. But this isn’t just another infertility story with another miracle baby ending, nor is it a sad introspective of a childless woman; this is a story about love, desire, and choices—and ultimately about hope. It is the story of a woman who escapes her addiction, not with a baby, but with her sanity, her marriage, and her sense-of-self intact. 2012 Independent Publishers Book Awards winner.

We Were Going to Change the World

After a Weirdos show, I was talking to some punk boys outside of the Whisky. I was really excited that I was connecting with “my own kind.” We talked about shows that we had seen, and when I mentioned that I had seen the Go-Go's, ...

We Were Going to Change the World

The punk rock scene of the 1970s and ’80s in Southern California is widely acknowledged as one of the most vibrant, creative periods in all of rock and roll history. And while many books have covered the artists who contributed to the music of that era, none have exclusively focused on the vitality and influence of the women who played such a crucial role in this incredibly dynamic and instrumental movement. We Were Going to Change the World captures the stories of women who were active in the SoCal punk rock scene during this historic time, adding an important voice to its cultural and musical record. Through exclusive interviews with musicians, journalists, photographers, and fans, Stacy Russo has captured the essence of why these women were drawn to punk rock, what they witnessed, and how their involvement in this empowering scene ended up influencing the rest of their lives. From such hugely influential musicians and performers as Exene Cervenka, Alice Bag, Kira, Phranc, Johanna Went, Teresa Covarrubias, and Jennifer Precious Finch, to such highly regarded journalists, DJs, and photographers as Ann Summa, Jenny Lens, Kristine McKenna, Pleasant Gehman, and Stella, to the fans and scenesters who supported the bands and added so much color and energy to the scene, We Were Going to Change the World is an important oral history of the crucial contributions women injected into the Southern California punk rock scene of the 1970s and ’80s. Empowering, touching, and informative, Stacy Russo’s collection of interviews adds a whole new dimension to the literature of both punk rock and women’s studies.

At Swim Two Boys

Going then to the boy's home. Infant paraded for his benefit. They offered tea which he had declined. Funny really, quite happily hop in his bed, but drink their tea? One expects the best and can get by on the worst: it is the populars ...

At Swim  Two Boys

Praised as “a work of wild, vaulting ambition and achievement” by Entertainment Weekly, Jamie O’Neill’s first novel invites comparison to such literary greats as James Joyce, Samuel Beckett and Charles Dickens. Set during the year preceding the Easter Uprising of 1916—Ireland’s brave but fractured revolt against British rule—At Swim, Two Boys is a tender, tragic love story and a brilliant depiction of people caught in the tide of history. Powerful and artful, and ten years in the writing, it is a masterwork from Jamie O’Neill. Jim Mack is a naïve young scholar and the son of a foolish, aspiring shopkeeper. Doyler Doyle is the rough-diamond son—revolutionary and blasphemous—of Mr. Mack’s old army pal. Out at the Forty Foot, that great jut of rock where gentlemen bathe in the nude, the two boys make a pact: Doyler will teach Jim to swim, and in a year, on Easter of 1916, they will swim to the distant beacon of Muglins Rock and claim that island for themselves. All the while Mr. Mack, who has grand plans for a corner shop empire, remains unaware of the depth of the boys’ burgeoning friendship and of the changing landscape of a nation.