Goodbye Things

In Goodbye, Things Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering specific tips on the minimizing process and revealing how the new minimalist movement can not only transform your space but truly enrich your life.

Goodbye  Things

The best-selling phenomenon from Japan that shows us a minimalist life is a happy life. Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert or organizing guru like Marie Kondo—he’s just a regular guy who was stressed out and constantly comparing himself to others, until one day he decided to change his life by saying goodbye to everything he didn’t absolutely need. The effects were remarkable: Sasaki gained true freedom, new focus, and a real sense of gratitude for everything around him. In Goodbye, Things Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering specific tips on the minimizing process and revealing how the new minimalist movement can not only transform your space but truly enrich your life. The benefits of a minimalist life can be realized by anyone, and Sasaki’s humble vision of true happiness will open your eyes to minimalism’s potential.

Goodbye Things

'Meet the new king of decluttering' - The Times 'Take your spring cleaning to the next level with Goodbye, Things by Fumio Sasaki' - Parade 'There's happiness in having less.

Goodbye  Things

'Meet the new king of decluttering' - The Times 'Take your spring cleaning to the next level with Goodbye, Things by Fumio Sasaki' - Parade 'There's happiness in having less. If you are anything like how I used to be - miserable, constantly comparing yourself with others, or just believing your life sucks - I think you should try saying goodbye to some of your things' Fumio Sasaki is a writer in his thirties who lives in a tiny studio in Tokyo with three shirts, four pairs of trousers, four pairs of socks and not much else. A few years ago, he realised that owning so much stuff was weighing him down - so he started to get rid of it. In this hit Japanese bestseller, Sasaki explores the philosophy behind minimalism and offers a set of straightforward rules - discard it if you haven't used it in a year; be a borrower; find your uniform; keep photos of the things you love - that can help all of us lead simpler, happier, more fulfilled lives.

SUMMARY Goodbye Things The New Japanese Minimalism By Fumio Sasaki

Perhaps you feel stressed, tired, under pressure, harassed from all sides and lacking space and money? Then minimalism is for you! *Buy now the summary of this book for the modest price of a cup of coffee!

SUMMARY   Goodbye  Things  The New Japanese Minimalism By Fumio Sasaki

* Our summary is short, simple and pragmatic. It allows you to have the essential ideas of a big book in less than 30 minutes. By reading this summary, you will discover how to become minimalist and make room in your life. You will also discover how : be calmer and reduce your stress; spend less; lose weight and be healthier; stop comparing yourself to others; live more slowly and intensely. If the consumer society has allowed abundance, it has done so at the expense of happiness. Too many choices, desires and possibilities make it difficult to see what is important. Cluttered with activities and objects, many people no longer even realize what they are doing and what should be done. Minimalism offers a concrete and immediate solution to this situation. It makes it possible to put one's life back in order, and even to find happiness. Perhaps you feel stressed, tired, under pressure, harassed from all sides and lacking space and money? Then minimalism is for you! *Buy now the summary of this book for the modest price of a cup of coffee!

Summary of Goodbye Things

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki - Book Summary - Abbey Beathan (Disclaimer: This is NOT the original book.) Take on the new Japanese minimalism in order to achieve true freedom.

Summary of Goodbye  Things

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki Book Summary Abbey Beathan (Disclaimer: This is NOT the original book.) Take on the new Japanese minimalism in order to achieve true freedom. Goodbye, Things is an interesting book for more than one reason but one of the most notable reason is that it's not made by a minimalism expert. It is by a regular person, like you and me. This makes us relate more to what he is saying and how a regular individual feels when taking on this philosophy... the results in Sasaki's life were extraordinary. (Note: This summary is wholly written and published by Abbey Beathan. It is not affiliated with the original author in any way) "Want to know how to make yourself instantly unhappy? Compare yourself with someone else." - Fumio Sasaki The desire of Saski to enter the world of minimalism was that he was tired of measuring the value of an individual through how much stuff he had. Humans constantly do this, develop an opinion of a person based on their income or the things he has that you don't. It creates a sense of envy and a negative environment in general. That's why minimalism started to become a thing because if you detach yourself from your worldly possessions, you'll be truly free. Witness how the new minimalist movement changed Sasaki's life and how it can change yours too. P.S. Goodbye, Things is an extremely interesting book that talks about the benefits of the new minimalist movement. P.P.S. It was Albert Einstein who famously said that once you stop learning, you start dying. It was Bill Gates who said that he would want the ability to read faster if he could only have one superpower in this world. Abbey Beathan's mission is to bring across amazing golden nuggets in amazing books through our summaries. Our vision is to make reading non-fiction fun, dynamic and captivating. Ready To Be A Part Of Our Vision & Mission? Scroll Up Now and Click on the "Buy now with 1-Click" Button to Get Your Copy. Why Abbey Beathan's Summaries? How Can Abbey Beathan Serve You? Amazing Refresher if you've read the original book before Priceless Checklist in case you missed out any crucial lessons/details Perfect Choice if you're interested in the original book but never read it before Disclaimer Once Again: This book is meant for a great companionship of the original book or to simply get the gist of the original book. "One of the greatest and most powerful gift in life is the gift of knowledge. The way of success is the way of continuous pursuit of knowledge" - Abbey Beathan

Summary

Well, minimalism is the answer you've been looking for! Why read this summary: Save time Understand the key concepts Notice: This is a GOODBYE THINGS Book Summary. NOT THE ORIGINAL BOOK.

Summary

Goodbye Things - The New Japanese Minimalism by Fumio Sasaki Consumer society has led to a profusion of material possessions. However, this has come at a price: our own happiness. Having too many choices, possibilities, and desires stops us from seeing what is important. Overloaded with things and activities, many of us no longer know what we're doing and what we need to do. Minimalism is a concrete and immediate solution. It allows you to tidy up your life and find happiness. Perhaps you feel stressed, tired, under pressure, bombarded, and are lacking space and money? Well, minimalism is the answer you've been looking for! Why read this summary: Save time Understand the key concepts Notice: This is a GOODBYE THINGS Book Summary. NOT THE ORIGINAL BOOK.

Goodbye Things The New Japanese Minimalism

Chapter 1 takes a look at the definition of a minimalist and what exactly it means to be one. It also explores some of the ... the ones I consider to be minimalists. Goodbye, Things The New Japanese Minimalism Fumio Sasaki Translated by.

Goodbye  Things  The New Japanese Minimalism

The best-selling phenomenon from Japan that shows us a minimalist life is a happy life. Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert or organizing guru like Marie Kondo—he’s just a regular guy who was stressed out and constantly comparing himself to others, until one day he decided to change his life by saying goodbye to everything he didn’t absolutely need. The effects were remarkable: Sasaki gained true freedom, new focus, and a real sense of gratitude for everything around him. In Goodbye, Things Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering specific tips on the minimizing process and revealing how the new minimalist movement can not only transform your space but truly enrich your life. The benefits of a minimalist life can be realized by anyone, and Sasaki’s humble vision of true happiness will open your eyes to minimalism’s potential.

Summary of Fumio Sasaki s Goodbye Things by Milkyway Media

In Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism (2015), minimalist and author Fumio Sasaki explains how readers can improve their lives by reducing the number of possessions they own. By simplifying their belongings and getting rid of ...

Summary of Fumio Sasaki   s Goodbye  Things by Milkyway Media

In Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism (2015), minimalist and author Fumio Sasaki explains how readers can improve their lives by reducing the number of possessions they own. By simplifying their belongings and getting rid of anything that isn’t essential, minimalists free themselves from some of the day-to-day stress that comes with ownership, like excessive clutter and time-intensive upkeep… Purchase this in-depth summary to learn more.

Secondhand

Travels in the New Global Garage Sale Adam Minter ... One evening, as I was nearing the end of this manuscript, a college student messaged Christine to ask about Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism, by Fumio Sasaki.

Secondhand

"Revelatory, terrifying, but, ultimately, hopeful." -Elizabeth Kolbert, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of THE SIXTH EXTINCTION From the author of Junkyard Planet, a journey into the surprising afterlives of our former possessions. Downsizing. Decluttering. Discarding. Sooner or later, all of us are faced with things we no longer need or want. But when we drop our old clothes and other items off at a local donation center, where do they go? Sometimes across the country-or even halfway across the world-to people and places who find value in what we leave behind. In Secondhand, journalist Adam Minter takes us on an unexpected adventure into the often-hidden, multibillion-dollar industry of reuse: thrift stores in the American Southwest to vintage shops in Tokyo, flea markets in Southeast Asia to used-goods enterprises in Ghana, and more. Along the way, Minter meets the fascinating people who handle-and profit from-our rising tide of discarded stuff, and asks a pressing question: In a world that craves shiny and new, is there room for it all? Secondhand offers hopeful answers and hard truths. A history of the stuff we've used and a contemplation of why we keep buying more, it also reveals the marketing practices, design failures, and racial prejudices that push used items into landfills instead of new homes. Secondhand shows us that it doesn't have to be this way, and what really needs to change to build a sustainable future free of excess stuff.

The Longing for Less

The closest to Kondo might be Fumio Sasaki's Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism, which was published in English in 2017. Another import from Japan but published by W. W. Norton instead of Kondo's Crown, the book's marketing ...

The Longing for Less

New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice "More than just a story of an abiding cultural preoccupation, The Longing For Less peels back the commodified husk of minimalism to reveal something surprising and thoroughly alive." -Jenny Odell, author of How to Do Nothing “Less is more”: Everywhere we hear the mantra. Marie Kondo and other decluttering gurus promise that shedding our stuff will solve our problems. We commit to cleanse diets and strive for inbox zero. Amid the frantic pace and distraction of everyday life, we covet silence-and airy, Instagrammable spaces in which to enjoy it. The popular term for this brand of upscale austerity, “minimalism,” has mostly come to stand for things to buy and consume. But minimalism has richer, deeper, and altogether more valuable gifts to offer. Kyle Chayka is one of our sharpest cultural observers. After spending years covering minimalist trends for leading publications, he now delves beneath this lifestyle's glossy surface, seeking better ways to claim the time and space we crave. He shows that our longing for less goes back further than we realize. His search leads him to the philosophical and spiritual origins of minimalism, and to the stories of artists such as Agnes Martin and Donald Judd; composers such as John Cage and Julius Eastman; architects and designers; visionaries and misfits. As Chayka looks anew at their extraordinary lives and explores the places where they worked-from Manhattan lofts to the Texas high desert and the back alleys of Kyoto-he reminds us that what we most require is presence, not absence. The result is an elegant new synthesis of our minimalist desires and our profound emotional needs.

Hello Habits

In Hello, Habits, Sasaki explains how we can acquire the new habits that we want—and get rid of the ones that don’t do us any good.

Hello  Habits

The internationally best-selling author of Goodbye, Things shares insights and practices to help us embrace habits and become the best versions of ourselves. Fumio Sasaki changed his life when he became a minimalist. But before minimalism could really stick, he had to make it a habit. All of us live our lives based on the habits we’ve formed, from when we get up in the morning to what we eat and drink to how likely we are to actually make it to the gym. In Hello, Habits, Sasaki explains how we can acquire the new habits that we want—and get rid of the ones that don’t do us any good. Drawing on leading theories and tips about the science of habit formation from cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and sociology, along with examples from popular culture and tried-and-tested techniques from his own life, he unravels common misperceptions about "willpower" and "talent," and offers a step-by-step guide to success. Ultimately, Sasaki shows how ordinary people like himself can use his principles of good habit-making to improve themselves and change their lives.

The Naked House

“It is very easy to put things away in boxes, but if the boxes aren't properly labeled to identify what went into them, ... Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, Marie Kondō Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism, ...

The Naked House

The solution is almost always fewer things. That's the Naked House philosophy in a nutshell, though the importance of top-notch organization (a place for everything and everything in its place), design unity, cleanliness and quality round out this book's description of the most desirable, peaceful home in which to live. With a tongue-in-cheek, personal style, The Naked House is an inspiring but not-too-serious primer on cleaning, organizing and reducing clutter-and on changing the way you view the purpose and soul of your home.

A Year of Living Simply

The root of this fear is, I think, something to do with my need for order in just one area of my life. ... to live in the way Japanese writer Fumio Sasaki describes in his book Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism.

A Year of Living Simply

'Simply wonderful.' - BEN FOGLE 'Kate's book has the warmth and calming effect of a log fire and a glass of wine. Unknit your brow and let go. It's a treat.' - GARETH MALONE 'Kate Humble pours her enviable knowledge into attainable goals. It's a winning combination and the prize - a life in balance with nature - is definitely worth claiming.' - LUCY SIEGLE 'As ever, where Kate leads, I follow. She has made me reassess and reset.' - DAN SNOW 'Kate Humble's new book is a lesson in moving on from a tragedy and finding our place in the world' - WOMAN & HOME 'A Year of Living Simply is timely, given that the pandemic has forced most of us, in some way to simplify our lives, whether we planned to or not. Kate wrote it before any of us were aware of the upcoming crisis, but it captures the current moment perfectly... It's not necessarily a "how to" book, more of a "why not try?" approach.' - FRANCESCA BABB, MAIL ON SUNDAY YOU 'What I particularly love is her philosophy for happiness, which is the subject of her new book, A Year of Living Simply. The clue is in the title. Remember the basics. Instead of barging through the day on autopilot, really stop to think about the tiniest little things that added a moment of joy. No, of course stopping and smelling the flowers won't cure all our ills and woes. But taking the time to savour the things that bring pleasure, really being in that moment and appreciating it, can remind you that most days have moments that buoy your mood.' - JO ELVIN, MAIL ON SUNDAY YOU If there is one thing that most of us aspire to, it is, simply, to be happy. And yet attaining happiness has become, it appears, anything but simple. Having stuff - The Latest, The Newest, The Best Yet - is all too often peddled as the sure fire route to happiness. So why then, in our consumer-driven society, is depression, stress and anxiety ever more common, affecting every strata of society and every age, even, worryingly, the very young? Why is it, when we have so much, that many of us still feel we are missing something and the rush of pleasure when we buy something new turns so quickly into a feeling of emptiness, or purposelessness, or guilt? So what is the route to real, deep, long lasting happiness? Could it be that our lives have just become overly crowded, that we've lost sight of the things - the simple things - that give a sense of achievement, a feeling of joy or excitement? That make us happy. Do we need to take a step back, reprioritise? Do we need to make our lives more simple? Kate Humble's fresh and frank exploration of a stripped-back approach to life is uplifting, engaging and inspiring - and will help us all find balance and happiness every day.

The Routledge Handbook of Place

Oxford, John Wiley & Sons. Rosenberger, R. (2017) Callous Objects: Designs Against the Homeless. Cambridge, MA, University of Minnesota Press. Sasaki, F. (2017) Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism. New York, W. W. Norton.

The Routledge Handbook of Place

The handbook presents a compendium of the diverse and growing approaches to place from leading authors as well as less widely known scholars, providing a comprehensive yet cutting-edge overview of theories, concepts and creative engagements with place that resonate with contemporary concerns and debates. The volume moves away from purely western-based conceptions and discussions about place to include perspectives from across the world. It includes an introductory chapter, which outlines key definitions, draws out influential historical and contemporary approaches to the theorisation of place and sketches out the structure of the book, explaining the logic of the seven clearly themed sections. Each section begins with a short introductory essay that provides identifying key ideas and contextualises the essays that follow. The original and distinctive contributions from both new and leading authorities from across the discipline provide a wide, rich and comprehensive collection that chimes with current critical thinking in geography. The book captures the dynamism and multiplicity of current geographical thinking about place by including both state-of-the-art, in-depth, critical overviews of theoretical approaches to place and new explorations and cases that chart a framework for future research. It charts the multiple ways in which place might be conceived, situated and practised. This unique, comprehensive and rich collection will be an essential resource for undergraduate and graduate teaching, for experienced academics across a wide range of disciplines and for policymakers and place-marketers. It will provide an invaluable and up-to-date guide to current thinking across the range of disciplines, such as Geography, Sociology and Politics, and interdisciplinary fields such as Urban Studies, Environmental Studies and Planning.

Waste

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism. Translated by Eriko Sugita. New York: W. W. Norton, 2017. Sasaki Töru. MCON Report 109: Shöenerugi jidai no mákechingu senryaku. Tokyo: Mäkechingu Kondankai, 1979. Satake Hiroaki.

Waste

In Waste, Eiko Maruko Siniawer innovatively explores the many ways in which the Japanese have thought about waste—in terms of time, stuff, money, possessions, and resources—from the immediate aftermath of World War II to the present. She shows how questions about waste were deeply embedded in the decisions of everyday life, reflecting the priorities and aspirations of the historical moment, and revealing people’s ever-changing concerns and hopes. Over the course of the long postwar, Japanese society understood waste variously as backward and retrogressive, an impediment to progress, a pervasive outgrowth of mass consumption, incontrovertible proof of societal excess, the embodiment of resources squandered, and a hazard to the environment. Siniawer also shows how an encouragement of waste consciousness served as a civilizing and modernizing imperative, a moral good, an instrument for advancement, a path to self-satisfaction, an environmental commitment, an expression of identity, and more. From the late 1950s onward, a defining element of Japan’s postwar experience emerged: the tension between the desire for the privileges of middle-class lifestyles made possible by affluence and dissatisfaction with the logics, costs, and consequences of that very prosperity. This tension complicated the persistent search for what might be called well-being, a good life, or a life well lived. Waste is an elegant history of how people lived—how they made sense of, gave meaning to, and found value in the acts of the everyday.

The Power of Chowa

Finding Your Balance Using the Japanese Wisdom of Chowa Akemi Tanaka. Rosenberger, Nancy R. (ed.) (1992), Japanese Sense of Self. Cambridge University Press. Sasaki, Fumio (2017), Goodbye, Things: The new Japanese minimalism.

The Power of Chowa

'Following Tanaka's wisdom is an easy way to start making life feel just a little more balanced' the Independent The Japanese wisdom of chowa offers a fresh perspective on how to live, and new ways to find balance among the many different directions that modern life pulls us in. Chowa is a Japanese concept that is often translated as 'harmony', but more accurately means 'the search for balance'. Chowa is both a philosophy and a set of practices that can help us get to the heart of what is most important to us, and change our way of thinking about ourselves and others. This book will teach you how to apply the lessons of chowa to your own life to better focus on what really matters and cultivate an everyday state of equilibrium and calm that will help you feel ready for anything. Chowa helps us to better balance our priorities and our relationships and find inner strength and flexibility in times of change and difficulty. Whether you are searching for balance at home, at work, in your relationships or in any other area of your life, chowa offers new solutions and a way of thinking that we could all benefit from, now more than ever.

Effortless

An alternative is offered by Fumio Sasaki : Fumio Sasaki , Goodbye , Things : The New Japanese Minimalism ( New York : Norton , 2017 ) , 87 . Eric Ries : Eric Ries , “ Minimum Viable Product : A Guide , ” Startup Lessons Learned ...

Effortless

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A Times (UK) Best Book of the Year • From the author of the million-copy-selling Essentialism comes an empowering guide to achieving your goals. It all starts with a simple principle: Not everything has to be so hard. “In a world beset by burnout, Greg McKeown’s work is essential.”—Daniel H. Pink, author of When, Drive, and To Sell Is Human “At a time when fear, uncertainty, and our ever-growing list of responsibilities have come to feel like much too much to handle, Effortless couldn’t be timelier, or more necessary.”—Eve Rodsky, author of Fair Play Do you ever feel like: • You’re teetering right on the edge of burnout? • You want to make a higher contribution, but lack the energy? • You’re running faster but not moving closer to your goals? • Everything is so much harder than it used to be? As high achievers, we’ve been conditioned to believe that the path to success is paved with relentless work. That if we want to overachieve, we have to overexert, overthink, and overdo. That if we aren’t perpetually exhausted, we’re not doing enough. But lately, working hard is more exhausting than ever. And the more depleted we get, the more effort it takes to make progress. Stuck in an endless loop of “Zoom, eat, sleep, repeat,” we’re often working twice as hard to achieve half as much. Getting ahead doesn’t have to be as hard as we make it. No matter what challenges or obstacles we face, there is a better way: instead of pushing ourselves harder, we can find an easier path. Effortless offers actionable advice for making the most essential activities the easiest ones, so you can achieve the results you want, without burning out. Effortless teaches you how to: • Turn tedious tasks into enjoyable rituals • Prevent frustration by solving problems before they arise • Set a sustainable pace instead of powering through • Make one-time choices that eliminate many future decisions • Simplify your processes by removing unnecessary steps • Make relationships easier to maintain and manage • And much more The effortless way isn't the lazy way. It's the smart way. It may even be the only way. Not every hard thing in life can be made easy. But we can make it easier to do more of what matters most.

An Essential Guide to Aging Well

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism. New York: W.W. Norton, 2017. Strom, Max. There is No App for Happiness: Finding Joy and Meaning in the Digital Age with Mindfulness, Breathwork and Yoga. New York: Skyhorse, 2016.

An Essential Guide to Aging Well

This book is a refreshingly honest self-help guide to aging well. It encourages readers to dispel gloom or overcome denial around the subject of aging and offers advice in a realistic, non-prescriptive format. Practical yet personable, chapters move through pertinent topics such as making the decision to retire and successfully navigating that transition; designing daily routines (your practice) and engaging in activities (your projects); connecting with others as relationships shift and evolve; and managing moods and emotional issues. The guide also supports readers coping with illness or injury, experiencing loss and grief, and those searching for meaning as they grow older. Written in a conversational style, An Essential Guide to Aging Well motivates its readers to be curious about this time of life, and to design the best possible version of it for themselves.

The Human Scaffold

Goodbye, Things: The New Japanese Minimalism. Translated by E. Sugita, E. New York: Norton. Schwartz, G. 2012. “Growth, Development, and Life History throughout the Evolution of Homo.” Current Anthropology 53(S6): S395–408.

The Human Scaffold

Humanity has precipitated a planetary crisis of resource consumption—a crisis of stuff. So ingrained is our stuff-centric view that we can barely imagine a way out beyond substituting a new portmanteau of material things for the one we have today. In The Human Scaffold, anthropologist Josh Berson offers a new theory of adaptation to environmental change. Drawing on niche construction, evolutionary game theory, and the enactive view of cognition, Berson considers cases in the archaeology of adaptation in which technology in the conventional sense was virtually absent. Far from representing anomalies, these cases exemplify an enduring feature of human behavior that has implications for our own fate. The time has come to ask what the environmental crisis demands of us not as consumers but as biological beings. The Human Scaffold offers a starting point.

Buddhism and Waste

... Goodbye, Things (Sasaki 2015), reveals both a romantic idealization of the “minimalist heart” of Japanese culture ... Despite being initially hesitant about meditation, Zen, and yoga because of their “New Age, sketchy feel” (ibid.

Buddhism and Waste

In what ways do Buddhists recognize, define, and sort waste from non-waste? What happens to Buddhist-related waste? How do new practices of Buddhist consumption result in new forms of waste and consequently new ways of dealing with waste? This book explores these questions in a close examination of a religion that is often portrayed as anti-materialist and non-economic. It provides insight into the complexity of Buddhist consumption, conceptions of waste, and waste care. Examples include scripture that has been torn and cannot be read, or an amulet that has disintegrated, as well as garbage left behind on a pilgrimage, or the offerings of food and prayer scarves that create ecological contamination. Chapters cover mass-production and over-consumption, the wastefulness of consumerism, the by-products of Buddhist practices like rituals and festivals, and the impact of increased Buddhist consumption on religious practices and social relations. The book also looks at waste in terms of what is discarded, exploring issues of when and why particular objects and practices are sorted and handled as sacred and disposable. Contributors address how sacred materiality is destined to wear and decay, as well as ideas about redistribution, regeneration or recycling, and the idea of waste as afterlife.

The Art of Self Improvement

World (New York: Random House, 2018); and Erling Kagge, Silence: In the Age of Noise (London: Penguin, 2018). 11. ... 2019); and Fumio Sasaki, Goodbye, Things: On Minimalist Living (New York: W. W. Norton, 2017). ... For more on Japan ...

The Art of Self Improvement

A brilliant distillation of the key ideas behind successful self-improvement practices throughout history, showing us how they remain relevant today "Schaffner finds more in contemporary self-improvement literature to admire than criticize. . . . [A] revelatory book."--Kathryn Hughes, Times Literary Supplement Self-help today is a multi-billion-dollar global industry, one often seen as a by-product of neoliberalism and capitalism. Far from being a recent phenomenon, however, the practice of self-improvement has a long and rich history, extending all the way back to ancient China. For millennia, philosophers, sages, and theologians have reflected on the good life and devised strategies on how to achieve it. Focusing on ten core ideas of self-improvement that run through the world's advice literature, Anna Katharina Schaffner reveals the ways they have evolved across cultures and historical eras, and why they continue to resonate with us today. Reminding us that there is much to learn from looking at time-honed models, Schaffner also examines the ways that self-improvement practices provide powerful barometers of the values, anxieties, and aspirations that preoccupy us at particular moments in time and expose basic assumptions about our purpose and nature.