Gothic Antiquity

The volume establishes a series of dialogues between Gothic literature, architectural history, and the antiquarian interest in the material remains of the Gothic past, and argues that these discrete yet intimately related approaches to ...

Gothic Antiquity

Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, and the Architectural Imagination, 1760-1840 provides the first sustained scholarly account of the relationship between Gothic architecture and Gothic literature (fiction; poetry; drama) in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Although the relationship between literature and architecture is a topic that has long preoccupied scholars of the literary Gothic, there remains, to date, no monograph-length study of the intriguing and complex interactions between these two aesthetic forms. Equally, Gothic literature has received only the most cursory of treatments in art-historical accounts of the early Gothic Revival in architecture, interiors, and design. In addressing this gap in contemporary scholarship, Gothic Antiquity seeks to situate Gothic writing in relation to the Gothic-architectural theories, aesthetics, and practices with which it was contemporary, providing closely historicized readings of a wide selection of canonical and lesser-known texts and writers. Correspondingly, it shows how these architectural debates responded to, and were to a certain extent shaped by, what we have since come to identify as the literary Gothic mode. In both its 'survivalist' and 'revivalist' forms, the architecture of the Middle Ages in the long eighteenth century was always much more than a matter of style. Incarnating, for better or for worse, the memory of a vanished 'Gothic' age in the modern, enlightened present, Gothic architecture, be it ruined or complete, prompted imaginative reconstructions of the nation's past--a notable 'visionary' turn, as the antiquary John Pinkerton put it in 1788, in which Gothic writers, architects, and antiquaries enthusiastically participated. The volume establishes a series of dialogues between Gothic literature, architectural history, and the antiquarian interest in the material remains of the Gothic past, and argues that these discrete yet intimately related approaches to vernacular antiquity are most fruitfully read in relation to one another.

Gothic Antiquity

While Welsh, Irish, and Scottish antiquaries tended to locate the origins of their nations in Celtic and Milesian antiquity, English antiquaries often looked towards the Gothic past, the word itself deeply connected, as I show below, ...

Gothic Antiquity

Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, and the Architectural Imagination, 1760-1840 provides the first sustained scholarly account of the relationship between Gothic architecture and Gothic literature (fiction; poetry; drama) in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Although the relationship between literature and architecture is a topic that has long preoccupied scholars of the literary Gothic, there remains, to date, no monograph-length study of the intriguing and complex interactions between these two aesthetic forms. Equally, Gothic literature has received only the most cursory of treatments in art-historical accounts of the early Gothic Revival in architecture, interiors, and design. In addressing this gap in contemporary scholarship, Gothic Antiquity seeks to situate Gothic writing in relation to the Gothic-architectural theories, aesthetics, and practices with which it was contemporary, providing closely historicized readings of a wide selection of canonical and lesser-known texts and writers. Correspondingly, it shows how these architectural debates responded to, and were to a certain extent shaped by, what we have since come to identify as the literary Gothic mode. In both its 'survivalist' and 'revivalist' forms, the architecture of the Middle Ages in the long eighteenth century was always much more than a matter of style. Incarnating, for better or for worse, the memory of a vanished 'Gothic' age in the modern, enlightened present, Gothic architecture, be it ruined or complete, prompted imaginative reconstructions of the nation's past—a notable 'visionary' turn, as the antiquary John Pinkerton put it in 1788, in which Gothic writers, architects, and antiquaries enthusiastically participated. The volume establishes a series of dialogues between Gothic literature, architectural history, and the antiquarian interest in the material remains of the Gothic past, and argues that these discrete yet intimately related approaches to vernacular antiquity are most fruitfully read in relation to one another.

Spectres of Antiquity

By promoting an aesthetics of gloom, all three writers had a formative influence on the later Gothic. Yet it is not until Horace Walpole's A Castle of Otranto that the Gothic was attached to a supernatural genre all its own.

Spectres of Antiquity

Spectres of Antiquity is the first full-length study of the relationship between Greco-Roman culture and the eighteenth-century Gothic. In fascinating and compelling detail, James Uden's book rewrites the history of the Gothic genre, demonstrating that the genre was haunted by a deeper sense of history than has previously been assumed.

Sciences of Antiquity

... classical antiquity.1 These criticisms, together with the insistence on Grecian purity that seems to motivate them, are surprising in light of Walpole's lasting association with the Gothic through his neo-Gothic mansion, ...

Sciences of Antiquity

In the course of the eighteenth-century, discoveries ranging from Tahiti to Pompeii initiated a scientific turn in the study of the past. Seeking a formal language to display these new findings, Romantic-era plate books presented a wide array of objects as ancient relics. This proliferation of antiquities, a product of old affinities between natural history and antiquarianism, provided new material for the formation of archaeology, geology, anthropology, and othermodern disciplines. Sciences of Antiquity traces the production of five scholarly plate books on subjects of major literary and scientific interest at the time. Focusing on illustrators, fieldworkers, and ghostwriters associated with this type of scholarly publication,Heringman explores how the expertise acquired by these largely self-educated intellectuals precipitated a major shift in the way research was done - from patronage to professionalism. Ambitious, collaborative plate books, such as The Collection of Etruscan, Greek, and Roman Antiquities (1776) and Sepulchral Monuments of Great Britain (1799), forged a broader and deeper perception of antiquity as extending far beyond the Greco-Roman world.

The Cambridge History of the Gothic Volume 2 Gothic in the Nineteenth Century

His most recent publications include Writing Britain's Ruins (with Peter N. Lindfield and Michael Carter, 2017) and Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, and the Architectural Imagination, 1760–1840 (2019). SERENA TROWBRIDGE is Reader in ...

The Cambridge History of the Gothic  Volume 2  Gothic in the Nineteenth Century

This second volume of The Cambridge History of the Gothic provides a rigorous account of the Gothic in British, American and Continental European culture, from the Romantic period through to the Victorian fin de siècle. Here, leading scholars in the fields of literature, theatre, architecture and the history of science and popular entertainment explore the Gothic in its numerous interdisciplinary forms and guises, as well as across a range of different international contexts. As much a cultural history of the Gothic in this period as an account of the ways in which the Gothic mode has participated in the formative historical events of modernity, the volume offers fresh perspectives on familiar themes while also drawing new critical attention to a range of hitherto overlooked concerns. From Romanticism, to Penny Bloods, Dickens and even the railway system, the volume provides a compelling and comprehensive study of nineteenth-century Gothic culture.

Spectres of Antiquity

Spectres of Antiquity is the first full-length study to describe the relationship between Greek and Roman culture and the Gothic novels, poetry, and drama of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

Spectres of Antiquity

Gothic literature imagines the return of ghosts from the past. But what about the ghosts of the classical past? Spectres of Antiquity is the first full-length study to describe the relationship between Greek and Roman culture and the Gothic novels, poetry, and drama of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Rather than simply representing the opposite of classical aesthetics and ideas, the Gothic emerged from an awareness of the lingering power of antiquity. The Gothic reflects a new and darker vision of the ancient world: no longer inspiring modernity through its examples, antiquity has become a ghost, haunting contemporary minds rather than guiding them. Through readings of works by authors including Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Charles Brockden Brown, and Mary Shelley, Spectres of Antiquity argues that these authors' plots and ideas preserve the remembered traces of Greece and Rome. James Uden provides evidence for many allusions to ancient texts that have never previously been noted in scholarship, and he offers an accessible guide both to the Gothic genre and to the classical world to which it responds. In fascinating and compelling detail, Spectres of Antiquity rewrites the history of the Gothic, demonstrating that the genre was haunted by a far deeper sense of history than has previously been assumed.

Suicide and the Gothic

While its mission ostensibly sought to celebrate the heroic balladry of the British Isles from Gothic antiquity onwards, it did so by implicitly and explicitly depicting the Scottish psyche, particularly that of its nobility, ...

Suicide and the Gothic

Suicide and the Gothic is the first study of the representation of suicide in Gothic texts from the eighteenth century to the present. Poems, short stories, novels, films and video games are covered from European, American and Asian contexts.

Archaeologia Or Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to Antiquity

ARCHITECTURE , specimens of Architectural Antiquities , by J. A. REPTON , Esq . , in ten plates ,from Rochester ... some observations on the Gothic Buildings abroad , particularly those in Italy , —and , on Gothic Architecture in ...

Archaeologia  Or  Miscellaneous Tracts  Relating to Antiquity


Archaeologia Or Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to Antiquity

Fordington , Roman Antiquities discovered at , 421 . Fretted Niches , and other characteristics of Gothic Architecture , origin of in the decoration of the Buttress , 337 . G. Gardiner , Stephen , bishop of Winchester , proceedings ...

Archaeologia  Or  Miscellaneous Tracts  Relating to Antiquity


Art and Antiquity in the Netherlands and Britain

... he depended on it for his Germanic studies, praising its “diverse Francike, Anglo-Saxonike, and Gothic Antiquities, no where else to be found.”24 Discussed in Chapter 2 was the fact that Vossius' and Junius' intertwined efforts have ...

Art and Antiquity in the Netherlands and Britain

How did the classical tradition survive on the North Sea shores? This book explores the writings of Franciscus Junius that paired scholarship to painter’s practice in the seventeenth century. They illuminate the reception of antiquity and the creation of an Anglo-Dutch artistic Arcadia.

Archaeologia Or Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to Antiquity

A mixed lot of valuables of this kind must have been among the spoil when the conquering Goths entered South Russia . Another example , showing what sort of industrial art was in Gothic possession ...

Archaeologia  Or  Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to Antiquity


Late Antiquity A Very Short Introduction

Gothic,. classical,. and. Christian. culture. Theodahad did not write this piece of complex Latin. Its author, Cassiodorus, was a Roman aristocrat, who was also a senior civil servant of the Ostrogoth regime. His grandfather was a Roman ...

Late Antiquity  A Very Short Introduction

Sheds light on the concept of late antiquity and the events of its time, showing that this was in fact a period of great transformation

Byron s Ghosts

Dale Townshend is senior lecturer in gothic and romantic literature at the university of stirling, scotland. his publications ... 2013). he is currently at work on three major projects: a monograph entitled Gothic Antiquity: History, ...

Byron s Ghosts

In Byron's Ghosts British and American scholars join together to overturn some of the prevailing assumptions that romance scholars have made about Byron, offering a fresh new reading of his poetry. Informed by recent critical theory focused on spectrality, they look at ghosts in his work, both in the conventional sense—what Mary Shelley once described as the “true, old-fashioned, foretelling, flitting, gliding ghost”—and in a postmodern sense, one concerned with a range of phantom effects. Balancing attention on these diverse concepts of the ghost, their essays complicate the popular images of Byron as a materialist, skeptic, and anti-Romantic, revealing crucial new insights about his poetry.

Fonthill Recovered

The recipient of an AHRC Leadership Fellowship for a project entitled 'Writing Britain's Ruins, 1700– 1850: The Architectural Imagination', he is currently completing a monograph entitled Gothic Antiquity: History, Romance, ...

Fonthill Recovered

Fonthill, in Wiltshire, is traditionally associated with the writer and collector William Beckford who built his Gothic fantasy house called Fonthill Abbey at the end of the eighteenth century. The collapse of the Abbey’s tower in 1825 transformed the name Fonthill into a symbol for overarching ambition and folly, a sublime ruin. Fonthill is, however, much more than the story of one man’s excesses. Beckford’s Abbey is only one of several important houses to be built on the estate since the early sixteenth century, all of them eventually consumed by fire or deliberately demolished, and all of them oddly forgotten by historians. Little now remains: a tower, a stable block, a kitchen range, some dressed stone, an indentation in a field. Fonthill Recovered draws on histories of art and architecture, politics and economics to explore the rich cultural history of this famous Wiltshire estate. The first half of the book traces the occupation of Fonthill from the Bronze Age to the twenty-first century. Some of the owners surpassed Beckford in terms of their wealth, their collections, their political power and even, in one case, their sexual misdemeanours. They include Charles I’s Chancellor of the Exchequer, and the richest commoner in the nineteenth century. The second half of the book consists of essays on specific topics, filling out such crucial areas as the complex history of the designed landscape, the sources of the Beckfords’ wealth and their collections, and one essay that features the most recent appearance of the Abbey in a video game.

The Migration Period between the Oder and the Vistula 2 vols

It is best regarded as a record of Gothic history meant for an audience content with this ending or incapable of affecting it”.84 And subsequently: “It also is not intended to be a storehouse of authentic Gothic antiquities or to fill a ...

The Migration Period between the Oder and the Vistula  2 vols

This collection of studies is the result of a six-year interdisciplinary research project undertaken by an international team, and constitutes a completely new approach to environmental, cultural and settlement changes around the mid-first millennium AD in Central Europe.

East and West in Late Antiquity

The events that make up Cassiodorus' Scytho-Gothic prehistory are set mostly in Thrace, Dacia, and Scythia, that is in today's eastern Balkans and southeastern Ukraine, although those involving the Amazons are set in Asia Minor.70 It ...

East and West in Late Antiquity

East and West in Late Antiquity combines published and unpublished articles by emeritus professor Wolf Liebeschuetz. Among the topics discussed are defensive strategies, the settlement inside the Empire of invaders and immigrants, and the modification of identities with the formation of new communities.

Constructing Chicago

Adopting Gothic forms for an entire church building strengthened the distinction between religious and secular forms ... buildings were not encouraged to engage in the historicist fantasy that the structure had stood since antiquity .

Constructing Chicago

Traces the architectural history of nineteenth century Chicago, looks at Chicago's parks, churches, offices, and civic buildings, and looks at the image of Chicago they created

The North British Review

There is hardly a word that can be named which has its roots more deeply imbedded in Gothic antiquity . It is hard , and perhaps impossible , to say whether this “ mel ” should be regarded as originally signifying time , or mark ...

The North British Review


Lectures on the History of Literature

The spirit , indeed , is that of Gothic antiquity , the fictions and the personages are derived from the pagan legends of the north ; but all these are changed and purified by the predominant feeling and the faith of love , which have ...

Lectures on the History of Literature