Grammar in Mind and Brain

Grammar in Mind and Brain


Language Mind and Brain

This book explores these constraints and shows how linguistics could benefit by incorporating insights from research on language acquisition, language processing and neurolinguistics.

Language  Mind and Brain

Most linguists know little about the psychology of language and even less about its neural substrate. This book explores these constraints and shows how linguistics could benefit by incorporating insights from research on language acquisition, language processing and neurolinguistics.

Language Mind and Brain

This book explores the psychology of language and its neural substrate and shows how linguistics could benefit by incorporating insights from research on language acquisition, language processing, neurolinguistics and other disciplines ...

Language  Mind and Brain

This book explores the psychology of language and its neural substrate and shows how linguistics could benefit by incorporating insights from research on language acquisition, language processing, neurolinguistics and other disciplines concerned with human linguistic abilities.

Language Mind and Brain

The chapters in this volume are extended versions of material first presented at the National Interdisciplinary Symposium on Language, Mind, and Brain held April 6-9, 1978, in Gainesville, Florida.

Language  Mind  and Brain

The chapters in this volume are extended versions of material first presented at the National Interdisciplinary Symposium on Language, Mind, and Brain held April 6-9, 1978, in Gainesville, Florida. Importantly for interdisciplinary goals, the papers contained in this volume are quite “ available” ; that is, papers by philosophers can easily be read and understood by linguists and psychologists; the ideas of the linguists are readily comprehensible to any educated reader; the psychologists and neurologically oriented writers are clear and nderstandable. It is, then, a volume that cuts, not so much across disciplines, but through them. First published in 1982. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Foundations of Language

Probing the core and origins of language, a linguistics scholar shares his insights into the complex relationship between language, perception, and the human brain.

Foundations of Language

Probing the core and origins of language, a linguistics scholar shares his insights into the complex relationship between language, perception, and the human brain.

Psycholinguistics

This second edition of the successful text Psycholinguistics- Language, Mind and World considers the psychology of language as it relates to learning, mind and brain as well as various aspects of society and culture.

Psycholinguistics

How do we learn to produce and comprehend speech? How does language relate to thought? This second edition of the successful text Psycholinguistics- Language, Mind and World considers the psychology of language as it relates to learning, mind and brain as well as various aspects of society and culture. Current issues and research topics are presented in an in-depth manner, although little or no specific knowledge of any topic is presupposed. The book is divided into four main parts: First Language Learning Second Language Learning Language, Mind and Brain Mental Grammar and Language Processing These four sections include chapters covering areas such as- deaf language education, first language acquisition and first language reading, second language acquisition, language teaching and the problems of bilingualism. Updated throughout, this new edition also considers and proposes new theories in psycholinguistics and linguistics, and introduces a new theory of grammar, Natural Grammar, which is the only current grammar that is based on the primacy of the psycholinguistic process of speech comprehension, derives speech production from that process. Written in an accessible and fluent style, Psycholinguistics- Language, Mind and World will be of interest to students, lecturers and researchers from linguistics, psychology, philosophy and second language teaching.

The Mind s New Science

A theory of universal grammar is said to be an explanatory theory. To know a language is to be in a certain state of mind/brain: this state is described by a core grammar which consists of certain principles of universal grammar, ...

The Mind s New Science

The first full-scale history of cognitive science, this work addresses a central issue: What is the nature of knowledge?

InterGrammar

Chomsky 1965 : 4 ) ; in the seventies they went on to reject language as irrelevant to the study of generative grammar ( cf. Chomsky 1981 : 5 ) : we shift our focus from the language to the grammar represented in the mind / brain .

InterGrammar


An Introduction to Mind Consciousness and Language

COMPETENCE : A technical term introduced by Chomsky to refer to the knowledge of language that is in the mind / brain of the ideal native speaker . The competence is represented by a grammar . COMPLEMENT : In a tree in generative ...

An Introduction to Mind  Consciousness and Language

Much research has been directed at the brain and its more abstract counterpart, the mind. Incorporating the knowledge gained from this current research, the book looks at the relationship between language and the brain/mind.

Language and the Brain

When we measure brain signals, then, we're not measuring the brain basis of a grammar directly, but rather we measure the reflexes of this parsing process: word parsing mind/brain state of measured sequence sentence understanding brain ...

Language and the Brain

This book introduces readers to the state-of-the-art neuroscientific research that is revolutionizing our understanding of language. Interest in the brain bases of language goes back to the birth of the modern neurosciences in the late nineteenth century. Today, tools such as fMRI and EEG allow us to study brain activity non-invasively as people perform complex cognitive tasks like talking or reading. In this book, Jonathan Brennan shows how brain signals are connected with the intricate cognitive structures that underlie human language. Each chapter focuses on specific insights including the neural codes for speech perception, meaning, and sentence structure. The book also explores larger themes such as how to connect abstract notions like "knowing a language" to concrete signals that are measured in a laboratory, and how to reconcile apparently conflicting pieces of data that arise from different experiments. Written in an accessible, conversational style, and featuring a glossary of key terms, this slim guide will appeal to a wide range of readers interested in how the human brain allows us to use language.

Patterns In The Mind

In this fascinating book, Ray Jackendoff emphasizes the grammatical commonalities across languages, both spoken and signed, and discusses the implications for our understanding of language acquisition and loss.

Patterns In The Mind

What is it about the human mind that accounts for the fact that we can speak and understand a language? Why can't other creatures do the same? And what does this tell us about the rest of human abilities? Recent dramatic discoveries in linguistics and psychology provide intriguing answers to these age-old mysteries. In this fascinating book, Ray Jackendoff emphasizes the grammatical commonalities across languages, both spoken and signed, and discusses the implications for our understanding of language acquisition and loss.

Functionalism and Grammar

This book is Prof.

Functionalism and Grammar

This book is Prof. Givon's long-awaited critical examination of the fundamental theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the functionalist approach to grammar. It challenges functionalists to take their own medicine and establish non-circular empirical definitions of both 'function' and 'structure'. Ideological hand-waving, however fervent and right-thinking, is seldom an adequate substitute for analytic rigor and empirical responsibility. If the reductionist extremism of the various structuralist schools is to be challenged on solid intellectual grounds, the challenge cannot itself be equally extreme in its reductionism. The book is divided into nine chapters: 1. Prospectus, somewhat jaundiced (overview) 2. Markedness as meta-iconicity: Distributional and cognitive correlates of syntactic structure 3. The functional basis of grammatical typology 4. Modal prototypes of truth and action 5. Taking structure seriously: Constituency and the VP node 6. Taking structure seriously II: Grammatical relations and clause union 7. The distribution of grammar in text: On interpreting conditional associations 8. Coming to terms with cognition: Coherence in text vs. coherence in mind 9. On the co-evolution of language, mind and brain.

Origins of the Mind

mind-brain connections Charles Furst ... David, 160-61 Gardner, Allen, 124 Gardner, Beatrice, 124 Gardner, Howard, Shattered Mind, The, 131-33 generative grammar, 128 Gestalts, 40-42, 199 grammar, 122, 135; universality of, 129.

Origins of the Mind

How is it possible for people to remember past events or visualize future ones? Why have only humans mastered the use of language? What are the physical processes of the different states of consciousness - seeing, waking, sleeping, dreaming, thinking, and others? Origins of the Mind answers these and other questions as it explain the relationship between mind and body and describes the physical basis for the functions of the human brain.

Talking About People A Multip

understood independently of the properties of the mind/brain". The theory of Universal Grammar (henceforth UG), initiated by Chomsky, deals with I-language. Two basic questions within UG theory (cf. Chomsky 1986az3) are: (1) What ...

Talking About People  A Multip

First Published in 1991. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Psychosyntax

This volume examines two main questions: What is linguistics about?

Psychosyntax

This volume examines two main questions: What is linguistics about? And how do the results of linguistic theorizing bear on inquiry in related fields, particularly in psychology? The book develops views that depart from received wisdom in both philosophy and linguistics. With regard to questions concerning the subject matter, methodological goals, and ontological commitments of formal syntactic theorizing, it argues that the cognitive conception adopted by most linguists and philosophers is not the only acceptable view, and that the arguments in its favor collapse under scrutiny. Nevertheless, as the book shows, a detailed examination of the relevant psycholinguistic results and computational models does support the claim that the theoretical constructs of formal linguistics are operative in real-time language comprehension. These constructs fall into two categories: mental phrase markers and mental syntactic principles. Both are indeed psychologically real, but in importantly different ways. The book concludes by drawing attention to the importance of the often-elided distinction between personal and subpersonal psychological states and processes, as well as the logical character of dispositional and occurrent states. By clarifying these concepts, particularly by reference to up-and-running psychological and computational models, the book yields a richer and more satisfying perspective on the psychological reality of language.

Human Language and Our Reptilian Brain

See also Aphasia; Basal ganglia: damage; Parkinson's disease Brain-mind-language relationship. ... theories of syntax, 1, 11, 164; language regulation theory, 8; transformational grammar theory, 12, 147, 163; generative grammar theory, ...

Human Language and Our Reptilian Brain

This book is an entry into the fierce current debate among psycholinguists, neuroscientists, and evolutionary theorists about the nature and origins of human language. A prominent neuroscientist here takes up the Darwinian case, using data seldom considered by psycholinguists and neurolinguists to argue that human language--though more sophisticated than all other forms of animal communication--is not a qualitatively different ability from all forms of animal communication, does not require a quantum evolutionary leap to explain it, and is not unified in a single "language instinct." Using clinical evidence from speech-impaired patients, functional neuroimaging, and evolutionary biology to make his case, Philip Lieberman contends that human language is not a single separate module but a functional neurological system made up of many separate abilities. Language remains as it began, Lieberman argues: a device for coping with the world. But in a blow to human narcissism, he makes the case that this most remarkable human ability is a by-product of our remote reptilian ancestors' abilities to dodge hazards, seize opportunities, and live to see another day.

Language

Reviewed by HOLGER DIESSEL , University of Jena Language is grounded in the human mind / brain , and linguists agree that language , notably grammar , is to a large extent the way it is because of cognitive and neurological constraints ...

Language


Language and Meaning

What connectionism does is to pick up two elements of generative grammar, one of which — language learning in children and the place of grammar in the mind/brain — is considered irrelevant to generative grammar by one group of ...

Language and Meaning

This book illustrates the structuralist idea that language creates the reality we perceive. The data presented in this volume focus on the problematic issues of the passive construction and irregular (strong) verbs, with examples taken primarily from English with separate subsections on German and Russian. The author presents a new and different analysis of these complex topics which proceeds from the levels of form to meaning rather than the traditional and generative methodologies that follow the opposite path from meaning to form. This book will be of interest to all linguists who have ever confronted the controversial question of the interaction between lexical exceptions and grammatical rules. The scope of this volume is rather broad and it compares and contrasts text grammar versus sentence grammar in an innovative way.

Voices on the Past

It does show , however , that we need a theory of grammar in order to study syntactic change at all . ... or language change , but in terms of changes in these grammars , which are represented in the mind / brains of individuals .

Voices on the Past

The purpose of this volume is to offer a number of scholarly papers dealing with various aspects of medieval English language and literature. Voices on Medieval is organised in three main sections, according to contents: (1) medical and scientific texts and manuscripts, (2) language and linguistics, and (3) literature and culture. Bibliographic references and primary sources are given after each article, preceding the notes. We have devoted a special section to studies which portray ongoing research in the field of scientific and medical manuscripts. These essays correspond to a reflection of projects and individual work currently carried out in different European research centres and universities, such as in the Department of English of the University of Helsinki, in the Department of Modern Philology of the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, and in the Department of English of the University of Málaga. This special section will represent, we hope, a further contribution to the field and, also, to the forthcoming titles by Irma Taavitsainen and Päivi Pahta Medical and Scientific Writing in Late Medieval English (OUP) and Corpus of Middle English Medical Texts (John Benjamins).