Great Valley Patriots

Great Bridge, 49, 50, 100, 142, 170. Great Carrying Place, 52, 53, 54. Great Dismal Swamp, 179. Great Levels of Greenbrier, see Lewisburg Great Smoky Mountains, 194. Green, James, 217. Green Spring, 186. ... Helm, 254 Great Valley Patriots.

Great Valley Patriots


Puritans Patriots and Pioneers An Elwell Family History

McGuire, Thomas J., The Philadelphia Campaign, Volume II: Germantown and the Roads to Valley Forge, (Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania: Stackpole Books, 2006) Morrissey, Brendan, Monmouth Courthouse 1778: The Last Great Battle in the North, ...

Puritans  Patriots and Pioneers  An Elwell Family History

Like leaves in the wind, the lives of seven generations of the Elwell Family were driven by early American history. A short fourteen years after the Mayflower, Robert Elwell landed at the Massachusetts Bay Colony and prospered in one of the first settlements in the New World. His children fought in the first Indian War and endured the Salem Witch Trials. A new frontier in West Jersey became a refuge; and, two generations later, the starting point for a westward migration that lasted for over a century. Patriot Thomas Elwell sought his fortune on the Allegheny frontier and sharpened his skills as a soldier in Dunmore's War. He survived eight years of Revolutionary War service including front line combat in key northern battles, Valley Forge and the final southern campaign leading to Yorktown. Thomas moved west to Cumberland to welcome troops mustering to put down the Whiskey Rebellion before homesteading as an early settler in Ohio. His children pushed westward to build lives in the new Northwest Territory.

The Shenandoah Valley 1861 1865

4. Howard McKnight Wilson , Great Valley Patriots ( Verona , Va .: McClure Press , 1976 ) , 4 ; Wayland , German Element of the Shenandoah Valley , 20 ; Leyburn , The Scotch - Irish , 203-7 . 5. Thomas D. Gold , History of Clarke County ...

The Shenandoah Valley  1861 1865

Has the significance of the Shenandoah Valley during the Civil War been overestimated? An extensive array of primary sources--including Philip Sheridan's official report--point to this revisionist conclusion.

Ulster to America

Augusta County Vestry Book, April 6, 1747, Augusta County Courthouse. 21. Peyton, History ofAugusta County, 97. 22. The story has been told from a clearly American point of view in Howard McKnight Wilson, Great Valley Patriots—Western ...

Ulster to America

In Ulster to America: The Scots-Irish Migration Experience, 1680–1830, editor Warren R. Hofstra has gathered contributions from pioneering scholars who are rewriting the history of the Scots-Irish. In addition to presenting fresh information based on thorough and detailed research, they offer cutting-edge interpretations that help explain the Scots-Irish experience in the United States. In place of implacable Scots-Irish individualism, the writers stress the urge to build communities among Ulster immigrants. In place of rootlessness and isolation, the authors point to the trans-Atlantic continuity of Scots-Irish settlement and the presence of Germans and Anglo-Americans in so-called Scots-Irish areas. In a variety of ways, the book asserts, the Scots-Irish actually modified or abandoned some of their own cultural traits as a result of interacting with people of other backgrounds and in response to many of the main themes defining American history. While the Scots-Irish myth has proved useful over time to various groups with their own agendas—including modern-day conservatives and fundamentalist Christians—this book, by clearing away long-standing but erroneous ideas about the Scots-Irish, represents a major advance in our understanding of these immigrants. It also places Scots-Irish migration within the broader context of the historiographical construct of the Atlantic world. Organized in chronological and migratory order, this volume includes contributions on specific U.S. centers for Ulster immigrants: New Castle, Delaware; Donegal Springs, Pennsylvania; Carlisle, Pennsylvania; Opequon, Virginia; the Virginia frontier; the Carolina backcountry; southwestern Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. Ulster to America is essential reading for scholars and students of American history, immigration history, local history, and the colonial era, as well as all those who seek a fuller understanding of the Scots-Irish immigrant story.

Tragedy at Chu Lai

As the high school days of pranks, hunting and target shooting, chasing girls and racing on the streets waned, ... Great Valley's Patriots, as its sports teams were called, had been toddlers the last time their country had fought a war, ...

Tragedy at Chu Lai

Nicky Venditti, a U.S. Army helicopter pilot with a love of fast cars and practical jokes, went to Vietnam in 1969 and was dead in 11 days, killed by an Americal Division grenade training explosion at Chu Lai. The full story of the incident did not come out until the author, David Venditta (a different spelling), Venditti's cousin, made a chance discovery that began a decades-long effort to find out exactly what happened, what the Army did about it and who was held responsible. This book documents the Army's mishandling of the incident and the effects on the families and friends of Venditti and of the two other young soldiers who died with him.

Gentry and Common Folk

Wilson, Great Valley Patriots, p. 17. 29. Arthur Campbell to William Campbell, 29 Aug. 1774, CampbellPreston Papers, reel 1, #45; Arthur Campbell to Preston, 28 Aug. 1774, 3QQ85. Apparently Drake had used the same tactics in an earlier ...

Gentry and Common Folk

In the late eighteenth century, the Upper Valley of Virginia experienced a conflict between the elitist culture of the gentry and the more republican values of the populace. Albert Tillson addresses here several major issues in historical scholarship on Virginia and the southern backcountry, focusing on changing political values in the late colonial and Revolutionary eras. In the colonial period, Tillson shows, the Upper Valley's deferential culture was much less pervasive than has often been suggested. Although the gentry maintained elitist values in the county courts and some other political arenas, much of the populace rejected their leadership, especially in the militia and other defense activities. Such dissent indicates the beginnings of an alternative political culture, one based on the economic realities of small-scale agriculture, the preference for less hierarchical styles of leadership, and a stronger attachment to local neighborhoods than to county, colony, or empire. Despite the strength of this division, the Upper Valley experienced less disorder than many other areas of the southern backcountry. Tillson attributes this in part to the close ties between the elite and provincial authorities, in part to their willingness to compromise with popular dissidents. Indeed, many of the subsidiary leaders in direct contact with local neighborhoods and militia training companies came to act as intermediaries between their superiors and popular groups. As Tillson shows, the events and ideology of the Revolutionary period interacted to transform the region's political culture. By creating tremendous demands for manpower and economic support, the war led to greater discontent and forced regional leaders to make substantial concessions to popular sentiment. The republican ideology sanctioned by the Revolution not only justified these concessions but also legitimated popular support for challenges to established leaders and institutions.

The Bicentennial of the United States of America

ELIZABETH HEARD ; SHENANDOAH VALLEY OUTDOOR DRAMA ASSOCIATION ; STRASBURG , VA 22657 . ... ROSE OF SHARON SINGERS , GOOCHLAND COUNTY BAND & JAZZ CONCERT AT SURRY HIGH SCHOOL AFTER FESTIVAL . ... GREAT HOUSE CLOSES AT 5:00 PM .

The Bicentennial of the United States of America


A Devil of a Whipping

Wilson, Howard M. Great Valley Patriots: Western Virginia in the Struggle for Liberty. Vérone, Va., 1976. Winham, William. A Plan of Discipline, Composed for the Use of the Militia of the County of Norfolk. 1759. Reprint.

A Devil of a Whipping

The battle of Cowpens was a crucial turning point in the Revolutionary War in the South and stands as perhaps the finest American tactical demonstration of the entire war. On 17 January 1781, Daniel Morgan's force of Continental troops and militia routed British regulars and Loyalists under the command of Banastre Tarleton. The victory at Cowpens helped put the British army on the road to the Yorktown surrender and, ultimately, cleared the way for American independence. Here, Lawrence Babits provides a brand-new interpretation of this pivotal South Carolina battle. Whereas previous accounts relied on often inaccurate histories and a small sampling of participant narratives, Babits uses veterans' sworn pension statements, long-forgotten published accounts, and a thorough knowledge of weaponry, tactics, and the art of moving men across the landscape. He identifies where individuals were on the battlefield, when they were there, and what they saw--creating an absorbing common soldier's version of the conflict. His minute-by-minute account of the fighting explains what happened and why and, in the process, refutes much of the mythology that has clouded our picture of the battle. Babits put the events at Cowpens into a sequence that makes sense given the landscape, the drill manual, the time frame, and participants' accounts. He presents an accurate accounting of the numbers involved and the battle's length. Using veterans' statements and an analysis of wounds, he shows how actions by North Carolina militia and American cavalry affected the battle at critical times. And, by fitting together clues from a number of incomplete and disparate narratives, he answers questions the participants themselves could not, such as why South Carolina militiamen ran toward dragoons they feared and what caused the "mistaken order" on the Continental right flank.

The Source

Wilson , Howard M. Great Valley Patriots : Western Virginia in the Struggle for Liberty , A Bicentennial Project . Verona , Va .: McClure Press , 1976 . Eckenrode , Hamilton J. Virginia Soldiers of the American Revolution . 2 vols .

The Source

Genealogists and other historical researchers have valued the first two editions of this work, often referred to as the genealogist's bible."" The new edition continues that tradition. Intended as a handbook and a guide to selecting, locating, and using appropriate primary and secondary resources, The Source also functions as an instructional tool for novice genealogists and a refresher course for experienced researchers. More than 30 experts in this field--genealogists, historians, librarians, and archivists--prepared the 20 signed chapters, which are well written, easy to read, and include many helpful hints for getting the most out of whatever information is acquired. Each chapter ends with an extensive bibliography and is further enriched by tables, black-and-white illustrations, and examples of documents. Eight appendixes include the expected contact information for groups and institutions that persons studying genealogy and history need to find. ""

Blue Ridge Folklife

In Great Valley Patriots: Western Virginia in the Struggle for Liberty (Verona, Va.: McClure Press, 1976), Howard McKnight Wilson underscores the fact that the residents of the Virginia Blue Ridge and the Shenandoah Valley were also ...

Blue Ridge Folklife

In the years immediately preceding the founding of the American nation the Blue Ridge region, which stretches through large sections of Virginia and North Carolina and parts of surrounding states along the Appalachian chain, was the American frontier. In colonial times, it was settled by hardy, independent people from several cultural backgrounds that did not fit with the English-dominated society. The landless, the restless, and the rootless followed Daniel Boone, the most famous of the settlers, and pushed the frontier westward. The settlers who did not migrate to new lands became geographically isolated and politically and economically marginalized. Yet they created fulfilling lives for themselves by forging effective and oftentimes sophisticated folklife traditions, many of which endure in the region today. In 1772 the Blue Ridge was the site of the Watauga Association, often cited as the first free and democratic non-native government on the American continent. In 1780 Blue Ridge pioneers helped win the Revolutionary War for the patriots by defeating Patrick Ferguson's army of British loyalists at the Battle of Kings Mountain. When gold was discovered in the southernmost section of the Blue Ridge, America experienced its first gold rush and the subsequent tragic displacement of the region's aboriginal people. Having been spared by the coincidence of geology and topography from the more environmentally damaging manifestations of industrialization, coal mining, and dam building, the Blue Ridge region still harbors scenic natural beauty as well as vestiges of the earliest cultures of southern Appalachia. As it describes the most characteristic and significant verbal, customary, and material traditions, this fascinating, fact-filled book traces the historical development of the region's distinct folklife.

Revolutions in the Western World 1775 1825

25 For additional summaries of the Tory movement see Evans, "Trouble in the Backcountry"; and Howard McKnight Wilson, Great Valley Patriots: Western Virginia in the Struggle for Liberty (Verona, Va., 1976), 120-34.

Revolutions in the Western World 1775   1825

Considering what has been described as an Age of Revolutions, Black assesses a formative period in world history by examining the North American, European, Haitian and Latin American Revolutions. Causes, courses and consequences are all clarified in the articles selected and an introduction charts the major themes.

Report to the Congress Pursuant to Public Law 93 179

... Ohio CIP 20th Anniversary Conference Council of International Programs $ 5,000 Cleveland , Ohio LaSalle Expedition II $ 10,000 LaSalle Expedition II Chicago , Illinois Great Valley Patriots Augusta County Historical Society $ 5,000 ...

Report to the Congress Pursuant to Public Law 93 179


For Virginia and for Independence

WMQ, 1st ser., 11 (1903): 2–3– 14. Williams, Samuel C. “Nathaniel Gist: Father of Sequoyah.” East Tennessee Historical Society Publica- tion, no. 5 (1933): 39–54. Wilson, Howard N. Great Valley Patriots: Western Virginians in the ...

For Virginia and for Independence

The phrase “American Revolutionary War Hero” usually brings to mind George Washington, John Paul Jones and other famous officers. Heroes, however, existed throughout the ranks during the Revolution, and many made their marks without ever receiving proper recognition. These portraits of 28 Virginia Revolutionary soldiers expand the historical record of those who can be called a “hero.” Whether as infantryman, cavalryman, marine, militiaman, spy, frontier fighter or staffer, all performed with distinction that contributed to victory. A strongman who performed superhuman feats during battle; a woman who fought as a soldier; a militiaman who sounded a fateful alarm—some gave their lives, others were terribly wounded, but all demonstrated heroism beyond the call of duty.

Second report to the Congress pursuant to Public law 93 179

... Ohio CIP 20th Anniversary Conference Council of International Programs $ 5,000 Cleveland , Ohio LaSalle Expedition II $ 10,000 LaSalle Expedition II Chicago , Illinois Great Valley Patriots Augusta County Historical Society $ 5,000 ...

Second report to the Congress pursuant to Public law 93 179


Master Register of Bicentennial Projects February 1976

... page 53 George Washington Birthplace National Monument Improvements Sponsor : National Park Service Washington Birthplace , Virginia Section 1 , page 90 Great Valley Patriots Sponsor : Augusta County Historical Society Staunton ...

Master Register of Bicentennial Projects  February 1976


A Bibliography of Tennessee History 1973 1996

Great Valley Patriots : Western Virginia in the Struggle for Liberty : A Bicentennial Project of the Augusta County Historical Society . Verona , Va .: McClure Press , 1976. 273 pp . Evan Shelby , Valentine Sevier , Anthony Bledsoe ...

A Bibliography of Tennessee History  1973 1996

With some 6,000 entries, A Bibliography of Tennessee History will prove to be an invaluable resource for anyone--students, historians, librarians, genealogists--engaged in researching Tennessee's rich and colorful past. A sequel to Sam B. Smith's invaluable 1973 work, Tennessee History: A Bibliography, this book follows a similar format and includes published books and essays, as well as many unpublished theses and dissertations, that have become available during the intervening years. The volume begins with sections on Reference, Natural History, and Native Americans. Its divisions then follow the major periods of the state's history: Before Statehood, State Development, Civil War, Late Nineteenth Century, Early Twentieth Century, and Late Twentieth Century. Sections on Literature and County Histories round out the book. Included is a helpful subject index that points the reader to particular persons, places, incidents, or topics. Substantial sections in this index highlight women's history and African American history, two areas in which scholarship has proliferated during the past two decades. The history of entertainment in Tennessee is also well represented in this volume, including, for example, hundreds of citations for writings about Elvis Presley and for works that treat Nashville and Memphis as major show business centers. The Literature section, meanwhile, includes citations for fiction and poetry relating to Tennessee history as well as for critical works about Tennessee writers. Throughout, the editors have strived to achieve a balance between comprehensive coverage and the need to be selective. The result is a volume that will benefit researchers for years to come. The Editors: W. Calvin Dickinson is professor of history at Tennessee Technological University. Eloise R. Hitchcock is head reference librarian at the University of the South.

Community Leaders of Virginia 1976 1977

film , which rec'd . a 1975 citation from the Historical Foun . , Montreat , NC – Author of " Great Valley Patriots : Western VA in the Struggle for Liberty , ” being published in 1976 , a Registered Bicent . proj .; Ethnic Background ...

Community Leaders of Virginia  1976 1977


Branches Twigs

GREAT VALLEY PATRIOTS : ... Great Valley Patriots : Western Virginia in the Struggle for Liberty . By Howard McKnight Wilson . xiv , 273 pp .. clothbound . Order from Freedom Heritage Books , 114 Boddington Road , Staunton VA 24401.

Branches   Twigs


Catalog of Copyright Entries Third Series

3274 Great winter values , A 7744 76 . ... Green , D. W. SEE Green , Donald W. The Great World Series program collection , vcl . 1 . A 799385 . ... 2626 Great Valley patriots : western Virginia in the struggle for liberty . A795446 .

Catalog of Copyright Entries  Third Series


Tennessee Historical Quarterly

Great Valley Patriots : Western Virginia in the Struggle for Liberty . By Howard McKnight Wilson ( Verona , Virginia : A Bicentennial Project of the Augusta County Historical Society , 1976. Pp . xiii , 273.

Tennessee Historical Quarterly