Greek Medical Manuscripts Diels Catalogue

Tome 1 offers a reproduction of Diels’ catalogue with an index of the manuscripts. The following three tomes provide a reconstruction of the texts contained in the manuscripts listed in Diels on the basis of Diels’ catalogue.

Greek Medical Manuscripts   Diels    Catalogue

The medical literature of ancient Greece has been much studied during the 20th century, particularly from the 1970s on. In spite of this intense activity, the search for manuscripts still relies on the catalogue compiled in the early 1900s by a group of philologists led by the German historian of Greek philosophy and medicine Hermann Diels. However useful the so-called Diels has been and still is, it is now in need of a thorough revision. The present five-tome set is a first step in that direction. Tome 1 offers a reproduction of Diels’ catalogue with an index of the manuscripts. The following three tomes provide a reconstruction of the texts contained in the manuscripts listed in Diels on the basis of Diels’ catalogue. Proceeding as Diels did, these three tomes distinguish the manuscripts containing texts by (or attributed to) Hippocrates (tome 2), Galen (tome 3), and the other authors considered by Diels (tome 4). Tome 5 will list all the texts listed in Diels for each manuscript in the catalogue. The present work will be a reference for all scholars interested in Greek medical literature and manuscripts, in addition to historians of medicine, medical book, medical tradition, and medical culture.

Greek Medical Manuscripts Diels Catalogue

Tome 1 offers a reproduction of Diels’ catalogue with an index of the manuscripts. The following three tomes provide a reconstruction of the texts contained in the manuscripts listed in Diels on the basis of Diels’ catalogue.

Greek Medical Manuscripts   Diels    Catalogue

The medical literature of ancient Greece has been much studied during the 20th century, particularly from the 1970s on. In spite of this intense activity, the search for manuscripts still relies on the catalogue compiled in the early 1900s by a group of philologists led by the German historian of Greek philosophy and medicine Hermann Diels. However useful the so-called Diels has been and still is, it is now in need of a thorough revision. The present five-tome set is a first step in that direction. Tome 1 offers a reproduction of Diels’ catalogue with an index of the manuscripts. The following three tomes provide a reconstruction of the texts contained in the manuscripts listed in Diels on the basis of Diels’ catalogue. Proceeding as Diels did, these three tomes distinguish the manuscripts containing texts by (or attributed to) Hippocrates (tome 2), Galen (tome 3), and the other authors considered by Diels (tome 4). Tome 5 will list all the texts listed in Diels for each manuscript in the catalogue. The present work will be a reference for all scholars interested in Greek medical literature and manuscripts, in addition to historians of medicine, medical book, medical tradition, and medical culture.

Greek Medical Manuscripts Diels Catalogue

Tome 1 offers a reproduction of Diels’ catalogue with an index of the manuscripts. The following three tomes provide a reconstruction of the texts contained in the manuscripts listed in Diels on the basis of Diels’ catalogue.

Greek Medical Manuscripts   Diels  Catalogue

The medical literature of ancient Greece has been much studied during the 20th century, particularly from the 1970s on. In spite of this intense activity, the search for manuscripts still relies on the catalogue compiled in the early 1900s by a group of philologists led by the German historian of Greek philosophy and medicine Hermann Diels. However useful the so-called Diels has been and still is, it is now in need of a thorough revision. The present five-tome set is a first step in that direction. Tome 1 offers a reproduction of Diels’ catalogue with an index of the manuscripts. The following three tomes provide a reconstruction of the texts contained in the manuscripts listed in Diels on the basis of Diels’ catalogue. Proceeding as Diels did, these three tomes distinguish the manuscripts containing texts by (or attributed to) Hippocrates (tome 2), Galen (tome 3), and the other authors considered by Diels (tome 4). Tome 5 will list all the texts listed in Diels for each manuscript in the catalogue. The present work will be a reference for all scholars interested in Greek medical literature and manuscripts, in addition to historians of medicine, medical book, medical tradition, and medical culture.

Greek Medical Manuscripts Diels Catalogue

Greek medical manuscripts have been catalogued differently over the centuries. Based on the inventory of their texts in Diels' lists, this tome offers the first standardized catalogue.

Greek Medical Manuscripts   Diels    Catalogue

Greek medical manuscripts have been catalogued differently over the centuries. Based on the inventory of their texts in Diels' lists, this tome offers the first standardized catalogue. When appropriate, manuscript location or shelfmark according to Diels have been corrected and updated to reflect the current state of collections worldwide. This tome is the first step toward a full catalogue that will renew understanding of the Greek medical tradition and ultimately lead to the much-awaited New Diels.

Ceteri Medici

Proceeding as Diels did, these three volumes distinguish the manuscripts containing texts by (or attributed to) Hippocrates (vol. 2), Galen (vol. 3), and the other authors considered by Diels (vol. 4).

Ceteri Medici

The medical literature of ancient Greece has been much studied during the 20th century, particularly from the 1970s on. In spite of this intense activity, the search for manuscripts still relies on the catalogue compiled in the early 1900s by a group of philologists led by the German historian of Greek philosophy and medicine Hermann Diels. However useful the so-called Diels has been and still is, it is now in need of a thorough revision. The present five-volume set is a first step in that direction. Volume 1 offers a reproduction of Diels' catalogue with an index of the manuscripts. The following three volumes provide a reconstruction of the texts contained in the manuscripts listed in Diels on the basis of Diels' catalogue. Proceeding as Diels did, these three volumes distinguish the manuscripts containing texts by (or attributed to) Hippocrates (vol. 2), Galen (vol. 3), and the other authors considered by Diels (vol. 4). Volume 5 will list all the texts listed in Diels for each manuscript in the catalogue. The present work will be a reference for all scholars interested in Greek medical literature and manuscripts, in addition to historians of medicine, medical book, medical tradition, and medical culture.

A Census of Greek Medical Manuscripts

Although it does not supersede Diels’ catalogue, it is the indispensable instrument for a New Diels, and will be the reference for years to come for any new critical edition and medico-historical research based on manuscripts, besides ...

A Census of Greek Medical Manuscripts

Manuscripts containing Greek medical texts were inventoried by author and work at the beginning of the 20th century by a group of philologists under the direction of Hermann Diels. Useful as it was - and will continue to be – Diels’ catalogue omitted authors and works, misidentified manuscripts, and overlooked codices. Furthermore, since the publication of the catalogue, some libraries have adopted a new system of classification, manuscripts have been destroyed, items have changed location, and new ones have come to light. The present Census is a checklist of the Greek medical manuscripts currently known in collections worldwide. It is both an amended and updated index of Diels’ catalogue, and a list of the items missed or overlooked in Diels, or located since. Although it does not supersede Diels’ catalogue, it is the indispensable instrument for a New Diels, and will be the reference for years to come for any new critical edition and medico-historical research based on manuscripts, besides providing the basis for a broad range of other historical inquiries, from codicology to the history of medicine and science, including Byzantine intellectual history, Renaissance studies and humanism, history of the book and early printing, and the history of medical philology and learning.

Greek Medical Manuscripts Diels Catalogue

Tome 1 offers a reproduction of Diels’ catalogue with an index of the manuscripts. The following three tomes provide a reconstruction of the texts contained in the manuscripts listed in Diels on the basis of Diels’ catalogue.

Greek Medical Manuscripts   Diels    Catalogue

The medical literature of ancient Greece has been much studied during the 20th century, particularly from the 1970s on. In spite of this intense activity, the search for manuscripts still relies on the catalogue compiled in the early 1900s by a group of philologists led by the German historian of Greek philosophy and medicine Hermann Diels. However useful the so-called Diels has been and still is, it is now in need of a thorough revision. The present five-tome set is a first step in that direction. Tome 1 offers a reproduction of Diels’ catalogue with an index of the manuscripts. The following three tomes provide a reconstruction of the texts contained in the manuscripts listed in Diels on the basis of Diels’ catalogue. Proceeding as Diels did, these three tomes distinguish the manuscripts containing texts by (or attributed to) Hippocrates (tome 2), Galen (tome 3), and the other authors considered by Diels (tome 4). Tome 5 will list all the texts listed in Diels for each manuscript in the catalogue. The present work will be a reference for all scholars interested in Greek medical literature and manuscripts, in addition to historians of medicine, medical book, medical tradition, and medical culture.

Handbook of Medieval Studies

(Robert E. Sinkewicz, and Walter H. Hayes, Manuscript Listings for the Authored Works of the Palaeologan Period, 1989; ... Also, a program aimed at producing a new listing and, later on, a catalogue of Greek medical manuscripts is ...

Handbook of Medieval Studies

This interdisciplinary handbook provides extensive information about research in medieval studies and its most important results over the last decades. The handbook is a reference work which enables the readers to quickly and purposely gain insight into the important research discussions and to inform themselves about the current status of research in the field. The handbook consists of four parts. The first, large section offers articles on all of the main disciplines and discussions of the field. The second section presents articles on the key concepts of modern medieval studies and the debates therein. The third section is a lexicon of the most important text genres of the Middle Ages. The fourth section provides an international bio-bibliographical lexicon of the most prominent medievalists in all disciplines. A comprehensive bibliography rounds off the compendium. The result is a reference work which exhaustively documents the current status of research in medieval studies and brings the disciplines and experts of the field together.

Hippocrates and Medical Education

It is a small treatise of Greek medicine The Pulse and the Human Temperament attributed to Hippocrates, mentioned by H. Diels in his catalogue of Greek medical manuscripts, but whose content remained unknown. When I was recently reading ...

Hippocrates and Medical Education

The collection of writings known as the Corpus Hippocraticum played a decisive role in medical education for more than twenty four centuries. This is the first full-length volume on medical education in Graeco-Roman antiquity since Kudlien’s seminal article from 1970. The articles in this volume were originally presented as papers at the XIIth International Colloquium Hippocraticum in Leiden in 2005.

Medicine and Pharmacy in Byzantine Hospitals

Whereas the first recipe is rightly attributed to Ioannes Staphicaces (under the title De nonnullorum medicamentorum compositione) in the catalogue of Greek medical manuscripts of Diels 1906:55, the whole text of ff.

Medicine and Pharmacy in Byzantine Hospitals

Scholars have made conflicting claims for Byzantine hospitals as medical institutions and as the forebears of the modern hospital. In this study is the first systematic examination of the evidence of the xenôn texts, or Xenonika, on which all such claims must in part rest. These texts, compiled broadly between the ninth and thirteenth centuries, are also transcribed or edited, with the exception of the combined texts of Romanos and Theophilos that, the study proposes, were originally a single manual and teaching work for doctors, probably based on xenôn practice. A schema of their combined chapter headings sets out the unified structure of this text. A short handlist briefly describes the principal manuscripts referred to throughout the study. The introduction briefly examines our evidence for the xenônes from the early centuries of the East Roman Empire to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. Chapter 3 examines the texts in xenon medical practice and compares them to some other medical manuals and remedy texts of the Late period and to their structures. The xenôn-ascribed texts are discussed one by one in chapters 4–8; the concluding chapter 9 draw together the common, as well as the divergent, aspects of each text and looks to the comparative evidence for hospital medical practice of the time in the West.

A Companion to Byzantine Science

A. Touwaide, “Greek Medical Manuscripts. ... A. Touwaide, “Byzantine Medical Manuscripts: Towards a New Catalogue ... a Specimen for an Annotated Checklist of Manuscripts Based on an Index of Diels' Catalogue,” Byzantion 79 (2009), pp.

A Companion to Byzantine Science

This is the first book entirely devoted to Byzantine science, with essays by distinguished scholars offering the most comprehensive and up-to-date history of the field currently available, and aiming to position the field in broader scholarly conversations.

Greek and Roman in Latin Medical Texts

Touwaide, A. (2009), “Byzantine Medical Manuscripts: Towards a New Catalogue, With a Specimen for an Annotated Checklist of Manuscripts Based on an Index of Diels' Catalogue,” Byzantion 79, 453–595. Urso, A.M. (2000), “Procedimenti di ...

 Greek  and  Roman  in Latin Medical Texts

Latin medical texts transmit medical theories and practices that originated mainly in Greece. 'Greek' and 'Roman' in Latin Medical Texts studies the ways in which this cultural interaction led to innovations in the areas of anatomy, pathology and pharmacology, from the earliest Latin medical texts until well into the medieval world.

Handbook of Medieval Culture

[= Touwaide 2010b] Touwaide, Alain, “Byzantine Medical Manuscripts: Towards a New Catalogue, with a Specimen for an Annotated Checklist of Manuscripts Based on an Index of Diels' Catalogue,” Byzantion 79 (2009): 453–595.

Handbook of Medieval Culture

A follow-up publication to the Handbook of Medieval Studies, this new reference work turns to a different focus: medieval culture. Medieval research has grown tremendously in depth and breadth over the last decades. Particularly our understanding of medieval culture, of the basic living conditions, and the specific value system prevalent at that time has considerably expanded, to a point where we are in danger of no longer seeing the proverbial forest for the trees. The present, innovative handbook offers compact articles on essential topics, ideals, specific knowledge, and concepts defining the medieval world as comprehensively as possible. The topics covered in this new handbook pertain to issues such as love and marriage, belief in God, hell, and the devil, education, lordship and servitude, Christianity versus Judaism and Islam, health, medicine, the rural world, the rise of the urban class, travel, roads and bridges, entertainment, games, and sport activities, numbers, measuring, the education system, the papacy, saints, the senses, death, and money.

Medieval Textual Cultures

However useful it has been, my further work has shown that Diels's catalogue is not as accurate and complete as one would wish, particularly for the texts whose manuscripts I was trying to locate. See Touwaide, Greek Medical Manuscripts ...

Medieval Textual Cultures

Understanding how medieval textual cultures engaged with the heritage of antiquity (transmission and translation) depends on recognizing that reception is a creative cultural act (transformation). These essays focus on the people, societies and institutions who were doing the transmitting, translating, and transforming -- the "agents". The subject matter ranges from medicine to astronomy, literature to magic, while the cultural context encompasses Islamic and Jewish societies, as well as Byzantium and the Latin West. What unites these studies is their attention to the methodological and conceptual challenges of thinking about agency. Not every agent acted with an agenda, and agenda were sometimes driven by immediate needs or religious considerations that while compelling to the actors, are more opaque to us. What does it mean to say that a text becomes “available” for transmission or translation? And why do some texts, once transmitted, fail to thrive in their new milieu? This collection thus points toward a more sophisticated “ecology” of transmission, where not only individuals and teams of individuals, but also social spaces and local cultures, act as the agents of cultural creativity.

Bibliographic Access to Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts

Only the first part of Daremberg's survey of manuscripts containing Greek medical texts was published ( Daremberg ... The catalogue ( Diels , 1905 , 1906 and 1907 ) provoked many corrections and additions thereafter , for example ...

Bibliographic Access to Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts

This practical book is a detailed guide to various databases and computer services worldwide that provide access to medieval manuscripts. Covering everything from First Century Latin texts and ancient Greek manuscripts to medieval and Renaissance mathematical studies, Bibliographic Access to Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts provides thorough descriptions of electronic cataloging methods and the databanks either in progress or in existence that include these manuscripts. Five independent systems of cataloging these materials with computers and PCs are explained and evaluated in detail. This thorough volume features a discussion of the difficulties of using MARCs and AMCs to handle manuscript descriptions for which they were not designed and offers new ideas for meeting the needs of individual users and the needs of libraries networking through computer systems. Authoritative contributors include international experts in the use of computers for humanistic research and prominent scholars in the history of science and mathematics, medieval history and literature, and cartography. The helpful chapters contain valuable information on computer systems created to function as information retrieval catalogs for book descriptions in readable formats. Researchers will appreciate the practical advice for locating and using manuscripts and rare books in libraries. Archivists and rare collections librarians will find this a helpful and in-depth tool in finding information on successful cataloging and access to medieval sources.

Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen

At the start it is said that man After presenting this paper, I found a second unpublished Greek text which discusses the theory of the four temperaments. It is the text listed in the catalogue of Diels, HandschriftenI, p.

Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen

This volume makes available in English translation a selection of Jacques Jouanna's papers on Greek and Roman medicine, ranging from the early beginnings of Greek medicine to late antiquity.

Herbs and Healers from the Ancient Mediterranean through the Medieval West

Also, more recently, Alain Touwaide, “Byzantine Medical Manuscripts: Toward a New Catalogue,” Byzantinische Zeitschrift ... for an Annotated Checklist of Manuscripts Based on an Index of Diels' Catalogue,” Byzantion 79 (2009): 453–595.

Herbs and Healers from the Ancient Mediterranean through the Medieval West

Herbs and Healers from the Ancient Mediterranean through the Medieval West brings together eleven papers by leading scholars in ancient and medieval medicine and pharmacy. Fittingly, the volume honors Professor John M. Riddle, one of today's most respected medieval historians, whose career has been devoted to decoding the complexities of early medicine and pharmacy. "Herbs" in the title generally connotes drugs in ancient and medieval times; the essays here discuss interesting aspects of the challenges scholars face as they translate and interpret texts in several older languages. Some of the healers in the volume are named, such as Philotas of Amphissa, Gariopontus, and Constantine the African; many are anonymous and known only from their treatises on drugs and/or medicine. The volume's scope demonstrates the breadth of current research being undertaken in the field, examining both practical medical arts and medical theory from the ancient world into early modern times. It also includes a paper about a cutting-edge Internet-based system for ongoing academic collaboration. The essays in this volume reveal insightful research approaches and highlight new discoveries that will be of interest to the international academic community of classicists, medievalists, and early-modernists because of the scarcity of publications objectively evaluating long-lived traditions that have their origin in the world of the ancient Mediterranean.