Growing Up in the Middle Ages

Such an unfortunate girl had her childhood cut short. While the magnitude of this problem cannot be established, given the high rates of mortality in the Middle Ages, it was probably not that uncommon. As with older boys, ...

Growing Up in the Middle Ages

Dangerous and difficult for both mother and child—what was the birth experience like in the Middle Ages? Dependent, in part, on social class, what pastimes did children enjoy? What games did they play? With often uncomfortable and even harsh living conditions, what kind of care did children receive in the home on a daily basis? These are just a few of the questions this work addresses about the day-to-day childhood experiences during the Middle Ages. Focusing on all social classes of children, the topics are wide-ranging. Chapters cover birth and baptism; early childhood; playing; clothing; care and discipline; formal education; university education; career training for peasants, craftsmen, merchants, clergy and nobility; and coming of age. In addition, three appendices are included. Appendix I provides information on the humoral theory of medicine. Appendix II offers examples of medieval math problems. Appendix III covers a unique episode in medieval history known as “The Children’s Crusade.” Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.

Growing Up in Medieval London

have an additional bias against the " old country " as well — a place that one's forebears had to leave because it was too " medieval . " As one woman said when she heard the topic of my book , " Childhood ?

Growing Up in Medieval London

Details what childhood was like in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century London, discussing the importance of education and providing narratives of individual children

Childhood in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

What is the discourse that we call "medieval family life?" The last decade has seen significant challenges to the landmark work of Philippe Aries's Centuries of Childhood by historians such as Barbara Hanawalt and Shulamith Shahar.

Childhood in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance

Earlier theses on the history of childhood can now be laid to rest and a fundamental paradigm shift initiated, as there is an overwhelming body of evidence to show that in medieval and early modern times too there were close emotional relations between parents and children. The contributors to this volume demonstrate conclusively on the one hand how intensively parents concerned themselves with their children in the pre-modern era, and on the other which social, political and religious conditions shaped these relationships. These studies in emotional history demonstrate how easy it is for a subjective choice of sources, coupled with faulty interpretations – caused mainly by modern prejudices toward the Middle Ages in particular – to lead to the view that in the past children were regarded as small adults. The contributors demonstrate convincingly that intense feelings – admittedly often different in nature – shaped the relationship between adults and children.

Children and Childhood in Western Society Since 1500

59 Shahar, Childhood in the Middle Ages, pp. 2, 3, 40–1, 84. 60 Ibid., pp. 96, 85, 99. See also M.M. McLaughlin, 'Survivors and surrogates: children and parents from the ninth to the thirteenth centuries', in de Mause, ...

Children and Childhood in Western Society Since 1500

This book investigates the relationship between ideas about childhood and the actual experience of being a child, and assesses how it has changed over the span of five hundred years. Hugh Cunningham tells an engaging story of the development of ideas about childhood from the Renaissance to the present, taking in Locke, Rosseau, Wordsworth and Freud, revealing considerable differences in the way western societites have understood and valued childhood over time. His survey of parent/child relationships uncovers evidence of parental love, care and, in the frequent cases of child death, grief throughout the period, concluding that there was as much continuity as change in the actual relations of children and adults across these five centuries. For undergraduate courses in History of the Family, European Social History, History of Children and Gender History.

Growing Up in Nineteenth Century Ireland

A Cultural History of Middle-Class Childhood and Gender Mary Hatfield ... longevity of Ariès work to the contentious and radical challenge it posed to traditional assumptions about the stability of age and the universality of childhood.

Growing Up in Nineteenth Century Ireland

Why do we send children to school? Who should take responsibility for children's health and education? Should girls and boys be educated separately or together? These questions provoke much contemporary debate, but also have a longer, often-overlooked history. Mary Hatfield explores these questions and more in this comprehensive cultural history of childhood in nineteenth-century Ireland. Many modern ideas about Irish childhood have their roots in the first three-quarters of the nineteenth century, when an emerging middle-class took a disproportionate role in shaping the definition of a 'good' childhood. This study deconstructs several key changes in medical care, educational provision, and ideals of parental care. It takes an innovative holistic approach to the middle-class child's social world, by synthesising a broad base of documentary, visual, and material sources, including clothes, books, medical treatises, religious tracts, photographs, illustrations, and autobiographies. It offers invaluable new insights into Irish boarding schools, the material culture of childhood, and the experience of boys and girls in education.

Childhood Orphans and Underage Heirs in Medieval Rural England

C. Heywood, A History of Childhood; Children and Childhood in the West from Medieval to Modern Times (Polity Press, 2001), p. 10. See also his excellent discussion in 'Centuries of Childhood: An Anniversary—And an Epitaph?

Childhood  Orphans and Underage Heirs in Medieval Rural England

This book explores the experience of childhood and adolescence in later medieval English rural society from 1250 to 1450. Hit by major catastrophes – the Great Famine and then a few decades later the Black Death – this book examines how rural society coped with children left orphaned, and land inherited by children and adolescents considered too young to run their holdings. Using manorial court rolls, accounts and other documents, Miriam Müller looks at the guardians who looked after the children, and the chattels and lands the children brought with them. This book considers not just rural concepts of childhood, and the training and schooling young peasants received, but also the nature of supportive kinship networks, family structures and the roles of lordship, to offer insights into the experience of childhood and adolescence in medieval villages more broadly.

Illuminating Jesus in the Middle Ages

childhood of Jesus – Luke mentions only one childhood story between his infancy and his baptism; the other gospel ... However, usually medieval Christians were removed from anawareness of the rhythms of Jewish life and the Jewish ...

Illuminating Jesus in the Middle Ages

In Illuminating Jesus in the Middle Ages, editor Jane Beal and other contributing scholars analyse the reception history of Jesus in medieval cultures (6th–15th c.), considering a wide variety of Christological images and ideas and their influence.

Growing Up in France

5 Philippe Ari`es, Centuries of Childhood (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1962), pp. 125–30, 186,395–6. 6 Mayke de Jong, 'Growing Up in a Carolingian Monastery: Magister Hildemar and his Oblates', Journal of Medieval History, 9 (1983), 99–128; ...

Growing Up in France

How did French people write about their childhood between the 1760s and the 1930s?

Growing Up Mostly Normal in the Middle of Nowhere

As I have grown into adulthood and early middle age, the stories of Old Billy Hessong have faded. I no longer feel the same sense of having known him that I felt as a child. When I think about him now, I mostly think about how childhood ...

Growing Up Mostly Normal in the Middle of Nowhere

This memoir stands out as a beautifully written account of a mostly happy, mostly normal, fully real life at once both ordinary and extraordinary. Sheirer explores intensely personal experiences and relationships with humor, surprise, awe, suspense, and deep insight. With the depth of a memoir and the flow of a novel, Sheirer chronicles how his simple youth of farm, sports, school, nature, and family led him to an unlikely adulthood as an author and college professor.

Pedagogy Intellectuals and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages

Childhood as a category of abjection works as an instrument of political exclusion when it can be transferred, ... ''La Lettre volée''; Shahar, Childhood in the Middle Ages, 1–4, 95, 143–5; Hanawalt, Growing Up in Medieval London, 5–9.

Pedagogy  Intellectuals  and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages

This book is about the place of pedagogy and the role of intellectuals in medieval dissent. Focusing on the medieval English heresy known as Lollardy, Rita Copeland places heretical and orthodox attitudes to learning in a long historical perspective that reaches back to antiquity. She shows how educational ideologies of ancient lineage left their imprint on the most sharply politicized categories of late medieval culture, and how radical teachers transformed inherited ideas about classrooms and pedagogy as they brought their teaching to adult learners. The pedagogical imperatives of Lollard dissent were also embodied in the work of certain public figures, intellectuals whose dissident careers transformed the social category of the medieval intellectual. Looking closely at the prison narratives of two Lollard preachers, Copeland shows how their writings could serve as examples for their fellow dissidents and forge a new rapport between academic and non-academic communities.

Growing Up

The History of Childhood in a Global Context Peter N. Stearns ... from the vantage point of gender but deserving attention for childhood as well: from the late Middle Ages onward, western Europe developed a distinctive type of family, ...

Growing Up

Growing Up combines two flourishing historical fields—the history of childhood and world history—to address the question of how much of childhood is natural and how much is historically determined. The first lecture gauges the impact of the development of agriculture, civilization, and religion upon the premodern experience of childhood. The second lecture contrasts modern perspectives on childhood with more traditional ones before investigating how and why modern perspectives developed and spread. These lectures clearly demonstrate that the transformation of childhood is both recent and sweeping.

The Middle Ages

King Death: The Black Death and Its Aftermath in LateMedieval England. Toronto, University of Toronto ... Hanawalt, Barbara A. Growing Up in Medieval London: The Experience of Childhood in History. New York: Oxford University Press, ...

The Middle Ages

A brisk narrative of battles and plagues, monastic orders, heroic women, and knights-errant, barbaric tortures and tender romance, intrigue, scandals, and conquest, The Middle Ages: An Illustrated History mixes a spirited and entertaining writing style with exquisite, thorough scholarship. Barbara A. Hanawalt, a renowned medievalist, launches her story with the often violent amalgamation of Roman, Christian, and Germanic cultures following the destruction and pillaging of the crown jewel of the Roman Empirethe great city of Rome. The story moves on to the redrawn map of Europe, in which power players like Byzantium and the newly-established Frankish kingdom begin a precarious existence in a "sea of tribes" (in the words of a contemporary). Savage peoplesthe bloodthirsty Germans, the wild Visigoths and Ostrogoths, the fierce Anglo-Saxons, and the Slavs to the Eastas well as the sophisticated and ever-expanding Arabs threaten each others borders, invade cities and have their own cities sacked, fight victorious battles and get conquered in turn. Hanawalt charts the spread of Christianity in Europe, maps out the trail of misery and mayhem the Crusades left in their wake, explains feudalism and Church reform, familiarizes us with the astrolabe and the masterpieces of Romanesque and Gothic architecture, tracks the progress of the Hundred Years' War, and brings great historical figures--such as Charlemagne, King Henry II, Joan of Arc, Dante, and Justinian--to life. Spanning the millennium between the fifth and the fifteenth centuries, The Middle Ages: An Illustrated History captures the major historical and political events in great depth and clarity, but never loses sight of the plain and often-overlooked facts of lifelife as lived by peasants and townsfolk, kings and monks, men and women. Hanawalt offers fascinating tidbits on diverse facets of medieval society, from herbal medical cures to table etiquette and drinking habits, from tabloid-worthy court scandals to a unique listing of the rules of a monastic order. She examines rare textsfrom illuminated manuscripts to Carolingian minusculeand takes us inside the awe-inspiring Hagia Sofia in Constantinople. Barbara Hanawalt makes use of eclectic source material, including inscriptions, chronicles, artifacts, and literature, from the Koran to the Scriptures, and from Omar Khayam to the Goliardic poems. Fascinating stories--like that of the discovery of the burial site of an Anglo-Saxon chieftain which contained, among other treasures, an entire 86-foot long shipare interspersed among the chronicles of great historical upheavals. The author takes a sweeping approach to the subject, building a comprehensive, animated portrait of every aspect of life in that period by including material on women's place in medieval society, agriculture, art and literature, religion and superstitions, philosophy, and weaponry. Lavishly illustrated with art, photographs, documents, artifacts, and maps, The Middle Ages also includes a glossary, index, chronology, and suggestions for further reading. A collection of lavishly illustrated single-volume histories, Oxford Illustrated Histories present well-documented chronologies on topics like Britain, theater, Greece, opera, English literature, modern Europe, and more. Each history includes color and black and white illustrations, as well as photographs, and is compiled by a taskforce of leading scholars in its respective field of interest. These titles are ideal for any casual reader and also, because of the scholarship, serve as companions to any budding researcher's reference collection.

Growing Up in America

... traditional assumptions about the changelessness of childhood and argued instead that the idea of childhood had not even existed before the fifteenth or sixteenth centuries . Before this period , during the Middle Ages , Ariès says ...

Growing Up in America

Growing Up in America offers substantial and dramatic evidence that the history of childhood has come of age. Its authors demonstrate the breadth and depth of interest, as well as high quality of work, in a field that is finally attracting the attention it deserves. Strongly influenced by new social history and its concern for the powerless and inarticulate, Growing Up in America provides illuminating insights on children from infancy to adolescence and from the colonial period to present. "The very title of this fine and enormously instructive anthology of essays makes its quiet but important point---that children grow up in a particular nation, rather than in a family or home isolated from the influence of social, cultural, political, and historical forces. . . . An admirably diverse and instructive collection." -- Georgia Historical Quarterly

Cognitive Sciences and Medieval Studies

A good overview of the scholarship on medieval childhood can be found in Daniel Pigg, 'Children and Childhood in the Middle Ages', in Albrecht Classen (ed.), Handbook of Medieval Culture (Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2015), pp.

Cognitive Sciences and Medieval Studies

With the rapid development of the cognitive sciences and their importance to how we contemplate questions about the mind and society, recent research in the humanities has been characterised by a ‘cognitive turn’. For their part, the humanities play an important role in forming popular ideas of the human mind and in analysing the way cognitive, psychological and emotional phenomena are experienced in time and space. This collection aims to inspire medievalists and other scholars within the humanities to engage with the tools and investigative methodologies deriving from cognitive sciences. Contributors explore topics including medieval and modern philosophy of mind, the psychology of religion, the history of psychological medicine and the re-emergence of the body in cognition. What is the value of mapping how neurons fire when engaging with literature and art? How can we understand psychological stress as a historically specific phenomenon? What can medieval mystics teach us about contemplation and cognition?

The Middle Ages

drinking from the sea , lifting up the world serpent , and fighting against Old Age . ... ( RA grades 1-3 , IR grades 4-5 ) Growing Up In Viking Times ( Growing Up In Series ) , by Dominic Tweddle ( Troll , 1993 ) .

The Middle Ages

Presents a history of the ancient world, from 6000 B.C. to 400 A.D.

Infirmity in Antiquity and the Middle Ages

In addition to disability history she has published on medieval hagiography, childhood and folk beliefs. Ray Laurence is Professor of Roman History and Archaeology at the University of Kent ('the UK's European University').

Infirmity in Antiquity and the Middle Ages

This volume discusses infirmitas (’infirmity’ or ’weakness’) in ancient and medieval societies. It concentrates on the cultural, social and domestic aspects of physical and mental illness, impairment and health, and also examines frailty as a more abstract, cultural construct. It seeks to widen our understanding of how physical and mental well-being and weakness were understood and constructed in the longue durée from antiquity to the Middle Ages. The chapters are written by experts from a variety of disciplines, including archaeology, art history and philology, and pay particular attention to the differences of experience due to gender, age and social status. The book opens with chapters on the more theoretical aspects of pre-modern infirmity and disability, moving on to discuss different types of mental and cultural infirmities, including those with positive connotations, such as medieval stigmata. The last section of the book discusses infirmity in everyday life from the perspective of healing, medicine and care.

Childhood in Medieval Poland 1050 1300

collapsing time and trying to reconstruct one late medieval version of “childhood” where in fact many “childhoods” existed during the long span of the Middle Ages and its various regions. An alternative the Shahar's overly broad ...

Childhood in Medieval Poland  1050 1300

This book shows that childhood was an essential element in the arguments and purposes of authors in medieval Poland from 1050-1300 CE. This role of childhood in medieval mindsets has salient parallels throughout Europe and this is also explored in this volume.

Medieval Maidens

Several recent studies provide useful summaries of the debate , especially James A. Schultz , The Knowledge of Childhood in the German Middle Ages , 1100-1350 ( Philadelphia , 1995 ) , pp . 2–9 ; Paul Griffiths , Youth and Authority ...

Medieval Maidens

The medieval landscape, as viewed through the eyes of scholars, was hardly populated by women. Particularly, young unmarried women or "maidens" have been paid little attention. This book aims to fill that gap by examining the meaning, experiences and voices of young womanhood. The life-phase of “adolescence” was different for maidens than for young men, and as such merits study in its own right. At the same time a study of young womanhood provides insights into ideals of feminine gender roles and identities at different social levels.

What is Masculinity

Hanawalt, Growing Up, pp. ... Key publications on medieval masculinities include: JeffreyJerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler (eds), Becoming Male in the Middle Ages (New York, ... See ShulamithShahar, Childhood in the MiddleAges, trans.

What is Masculinity

Across history, the ideas and practices of male identity have varied much between time and place: masculinity proves to be a slippery concept, not available to all men, sometimes even applied to women. This book analyses the dynamics of 'masculinity' as both an ideology and lived experience - how men have tried, and failed, to be 'Real Men'.

The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Women s Writing

Finucane , Ronald C. The Rescue of the Innocents : Endangered Children in Medieval Miracles . New York : St Martin's Press , 1997 . Goldberg , P. J. P. ' Girls Growing Up in Later Medieval England . ' History Today 45 ( 1995 ) : 25-32 .

The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Women s Writing

This Companion examines the lives of medieval women by focusing on the texts that emerged from and shaped their experience.