Gulf Security and the U S Military

The U.S. military maintains a significant presence across the Arabian Peninsula but it must now confront a new and emerging dynamic as most Gulf Cooperation Council countries have begun to diversify their political, economic, and security ...

Gulf Security and the U S  Military

The U.S. military maintains a significant presence across the Arabian Peninsula but it must now confront a new and emerging dynamic as most Gulf Cooperation Council countries have begun to diversify their political, economic, and security partnerships with countries other than the United States—with many turning to ascending powers such as China, Russia, and India. For Gulf Arab monarchies, the choice of security partner is made more complicated by increased domestic and regional instability stemming in part from Iraq, Syria, and a menacing Iran: factors that threaten to alter totally the Middle East security dynamic. Understanding the dynamics of base politicization in a Gulf host nation—or any other—is therefore vitally important for the U.S. today. Gulf National Security and the U.S. Military examines both Gulf Arab national security and U.S. military basing relations with Gulf Arab monarchy hosts from the Second World War to the present day. Three in-depth country cases—Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and Oman—help explain the important questions posed by the author regarding when and why a host nation either terminated a U.S. military basing presence or granted U.S. military basing access. The analysis of the cases offers a fresh perspective on how the United States has adapted to sometimes rapidly shifting Middle East security dynamics and factors that influence a host nation's preference for eviction or renegotiation, based on its perception of internal versus external threats.

After the Persian Gulf War

The crisis in the Persian Gulf poses a serious threat to world order.

After the Persian Gulf War

The crisis in the Persian Gulf poses a serious threat to world order. Predictions of Iraqi actions were inaccurate and the unprecedented world response was surprising. A vision of peace, security, and stability in the future is equally perplexing. A complete U.S. military strategy including both peacekeeping and collective defense would shape this vision or strategy. Peacekeeping is essential but only part of the strategy; it is an interim solution. Peacekeeping was not intended to function as a regional collective defense. This paper focuses on collective defense. Collective defense is needed to enhance Gulf Cooperation Council security and protect U.S. interests. Collective defense can be achieved through several military options most of which were used prior to the Gulf War. The continuing post-war threats and volatile environment dictate a military option with the highest assurance of success and immediate, tangible results. A forward-deployed force is the only option that meets the criteria. This force called the Multinational Gulf Security Force (MGSF) replaces the current GCC military structure. The MGSF consists of air, ground and naval components from Arab, GCC and Western nations including U.S. participation. The most important element, the ground force, has multinational corps with uninational divisions. It is a sophisticated, lethal force that provides what the GCC cannot -- a credible self-defense. The MGSF is the key to a successful collective defense.

Persian Gulf Security improving Allied Military Contributions

Presents a discussion on the military capabilities and power of European allies in defending the Persian Gulf, and Europe's role in peacekeeping missions beyond Europe.

Persian Gulf Security  improving Allied Military Contributions

Presents a discussion on the military capabilities and power of European allies in defending the Persian Gulf, and Europe's role in peacekeeping missions beyond Europe.

The Clouded Lens Persian Gulf Security and U S Policy

This role represents a little - noticed extra dividend for the long - standing U.S.
policy of strengthening the military proficiency of the Jordan Arab Army .
Hundreds of Jordanian officers are serving in the smaller Gulf states , often in
replacement ...

The Clouded Lens  Persian Gulf Security and U S  Policy

Noyes var Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Near Eastern, African and South Asian Affairs fra 1970 til 1976. Forord af William J. Porter, tidligere Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs og tidligere ambassadør i Saudi Arabien og Algeriet.

Regional and International Powers in the Gulf Security

The Heritage Foundation, “2019 Index of U.S. Military Strength,” p. 21. 2.
Ulrichsen, Kristian, “Gulf Security: Challenges and Responses,” Proceedings of a
Conference Held at the Royal College of Defence Studies, Seaford House,
London, ...

Regional and International Powers in the Gulf Security

This book discusses the threats and challenges facing the Persian Gulf and the future security in the region, providing an overview of the major regional and extra-regional actors in Gulf security. It argues that except for Iran, no regional or extra-regional actors, including the United States, China, India and Russia, have developed a strategy for Persian Gulf security, and only Turkey has expressed a willingness to provide security for the region. Importantly, the major threats to Persian Gulf security are nonconventional, rather than external, threats to Iranian hegemony or the balance of power. In conclusion, it predicts that the power struggle in the Persian Gulf in the coming decades will be between Iran and Turkey, and not between Iran and Saudi Arabia. This book is of interest to diplomats, journalists, international affairs specialists, strategists and scholars of Gulf politics and security and defence studies.

Arms and Oil

In this book Thomas L. McNaugher offers a military strategy that integrates U.S. forces into the security framework that already exists in the region.

Arms and Oil

In 1979, after a decade of enormous increases in the price of oil, U.S. influence in the oil-rich Persian Gulf region declined sharply. Early in the year the Iranian revolution replaced the shah, the principal pro-American leader in the region, with rulers hostile to the United States and to its remaining friends around the Gulf. In December Soviet troops moved into Afghanistan, bringing the Soviets closer to the Gulf and the Indian Ocean. In the United States these events spurred the announcement of the Carter Doctrine and the creation of a new military command to handle Gulf crises. Yet the United States established no new fighting forces, and U.S. friends around the Gulf proved less willing than the shah of Iran to host a U.S. military presence. Thus debate has continued about whether and how the United States can secure important interests in the Gulf region. In this book Thomas L. McNaugher offers a military strategy that integrates U.S. forces into the security framework that already exists in the region. He suggests that the United States should encourage Jordan, Pakistan, Great Britain, and others to continue their historical involvement in Gulf security, especially in such areas as internal security where U.S. forces are no better equipped than theirs and where U.S. participation may undermine the legitimacy of local rulers. In turn, the United States should focus on protecting the oil-rich states of the Arabian peninsula from external attack and on deterring further Soviet encroachment in the region. These missions demand an increase in the agility, rather than the size, of U.S. forces. But the more important requirement, McNaugher argues, is for skillfully blending U.S. military strategy into a diplomacy that exploits, rather than needlessly upsets, regional security mechanisms.

U S Military Strategy in the Gulf Routledge Revivals

Noyes, James H. The clouded lens:Persian Gulf security and United Statespolicy
(Stanford,CA: HooverInstitution Press, 1979). Nyrop, R. F. et al. Area handbook
for thePersianGulf State (Washington, D.C.: American University, 1977). Odell ...

U S  Military Strategy in the Gulf  Routledge Revivals

First published in 1989, this title explores the nature and dimensions of the U.S. strategy in the Gulf in the formative years that followed the fall of the Shah, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the outbreak of the Iran-Iraq war. It describes the formation of the U.S. Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force and the U.S. Central Command, their force structure and the network of U.S. bases and facilities in the region. The role of pro-Western countries in the wider region, in particular Pakistan, Egypt, Jordan, and Israel, in the formulation of strategy is discussed in detail, along with a more general assessment of the achievements and failures of U.S. strategy in the Gulf towards the end of the 1980s. In light of the persistent struggle for peace within the Middle East, this is a timely reissue, which will be of great interest to students researching U.S. military strategy over the past thirty years.

The Changing Security Dynamics of the Persian Gulf

Bilal Saab, 'Why the Persian Gulf Isn't Ready for Joint Security', Defense One (
2014). 5. Adviser to the GCC Sami al-Faraj, cited in Angus McDowall and William
MacLean, 'Islamic State Blows Away Gulf Qualms about Joining U.S. Military ...

The Changing Security Dynamics of the Persian Gulf

The contradictory trends of the 'post-Arab Spring' landscape form both the backdrop to, and the focus of, this volume on the changing security dynamics of the Persian Gulf, defined as the six GCC states plus Iraq and Iran. The political and economic upheaval triggered by the uprisings of 2011, and the rapid emergence of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria in 2014, have underscored the vulnerability of regional states to an intersection of domestic pressures and external shocks. The initial phase of the uprisings has given way to a series of messy and uncertain transitions that have left societies deeply fractured and ignited violence both within and across states. The bulk of the protests, with the notable exception of Bahrain, occurred outside the Gulf region, but Persian Gulf states were at the forefront of the political, economic, and security response across the Middle East. This volume provides a timely and comparative study of how security in the Persian Gulf has evolved and adapted to the growing uncertainty of the post-2011 regional landscape.

Beyond Containment

Defending U. S. Interests in the Persian Gulf Richard D. Sokolsky ... including
refocusing the biennial Bright Star exercise with Egypt □ create a Gulf security
fund within the U.S. foreign military financing program to underwrite the
development ...

Beyond Containment

Summarizes the key judgments & recommendations of a Nat. Defense University book entitled ¿The U.S. & the Persian Gulf: Redesigning U.S. Forces for the Post-Containment Era.¿ Written in 2002, before the U.S. invasion of Iraq, it notes that with or without regime change in Iraq, the U.S. military posture toward the Persian Gulf will require significant adjustments over the next decade. The future of Iraq -- & the outcome of U.S. efforts to effect regime change & Baghdad¿s compliance with U.N. Security Council resolutions -- will be the key driver of the size & character of these changes. The U.S. will need to diversify its dependence on regional basing & forward presence, as well as reduce the visibility & predictability of its forward-deployed forces.

Shaping U S Military Forces for the Asia Pacific

... R. Kraig is assistant professor of national security studies in the Department of
International Security and Military Studies ... Foundation between 2005 and 2009
and implemented major projects on U.S. security strategy, Persian Gulf security, ...

Shaping U S  Military Forces for the Asia Pacific

Shaping U.S. Military Forces for the Asia-Pacific examines how U.S. Joint Forces should be used to face the threat of a rising China at a time when future crises and even wars are likely to be defined by relatively limited political stakes alongside competing nationalist identities.

Security and Territoriality in the Persian Gulf

Iran's revolutionary call for returning to Islamic values has never had territorial or
military implications against any country. The US initiative for a Persian Gulf
security system with the participation of Egypt, Syria and the GCC countries is not
, ...

Security and Territoriality in the Persian Gulf

This study presents the story of successes and failures of the treatment of security matters pertaining to territorial and boundary affairs in the maritime areas of the Persian Gulf, and at the same time provides an example of the impact of territoriality on world-wide maritime security.

National Security in Saudi Arabia

Reveals recent progress in Saudi reform efforts and formulates a plan to forge a true strategic partnership with the United States for the future.

National Security in Saudi Arabia

Reveals recent progress in Saudi reform efforts and formulates a plan to forge a true strategic partnership with the United States for the future.

Gulf Military Forces in an Era of Asymmetric Wars

Cordesman and Al-Rodhan provide an analytic study of how transnational terrorism, the threat of WMD proliferation, and the Iraq insurgency are having impacts upon the strategically vital states of the oil-rich Persian Gulf.

Gulf Military Forces in an Era of Asymmetric Wars

Cordesman and Al-Rodhan provide an analytic study of how transnational terrorism, the threat of WMD proliferation, and the Iraq insurgency are having impacts upon the strategically vital states of the oil-rich Persian Gulf.

Gulf Security and the Iran Iraq War

Should either the Carter Doctrine or the Reagan Extension be invoked, what
would be the mission of a US military intervention without clear policy objectives?
It would appear that Presidents Carter and Reagan have made firm commitments
to ...

Gulf Security and the Iran Iraq War


The Persian Gulf and the West RLE Iran D

It has examined in some detail both the debate about Gulf security in the United
States and the content of U.S. policy ... America's dominant military capability
makes the United States a key strategic actor in both Europe and the Persian Gulf
.

The Persian Gulf and the West  RLE Iran D

This volume provides a broadly comparative and historical re-examination of the fundamental strategic dilemmas that confront the Western world in the Persian Gulf region. This systematic study of how the West has defined and dealt with its security interests in this region reveals three central strategic dilemmas: strategy versus capability, globalism versus regionalism, and unilateralism versus collectivism. The first part of the book focuses on US policy with particular emphasis on the Iranian Revolution and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. The author explains why there has been a persistent gap between American perceptions of the Middle East and the political and strategic realities of the region. The second part of the book examines the frustrated efforts of NATO members to form a cooperative response to their collective interests in the region.

Reforming Military Command Arrangements

Our national security system turns our overall capabilities into active assets, protects us against the threats of an anarchic international system and makes it possible to exploit its opportunities.

Reforming Military Command Arrangements

Our national security system turns our overall capabilities into active assets, protects us against the threats of an anarchic international system and makes it possible to exploit its opportunities. Today, however, the system is arguably in dire need of reform. Much remains in the dark about how the organizations that safeguard our national security are reformed because international circumstances change. The author examines a crucial historical case of military reform: the establishment of the Rapid Deployment Joint Task Force (RDJTF)--the direct predecessor of Central Command. He discusses how the U.S. military adapted to the emerging security challenges in the Persian Gulf in the late 1970s by recasting military command arrangements. The RDJTF was one of the components of President Carter's Persian Gulf Security Framework, which marked a critical strategic reorientation towards the region as a vital battleground in the global competition with the Soviet Union. The author also suggests how national security reforms can be understood more generally. In this way, he lays out some of today's challenges that we must face in effectively restructuring our security and defense establishment. Especially in these times of fiscal restraint, a better grasp of institutional reform is very much needed. Based upon original interviews with key civilians and military officers as well as extensive archival research, including the analysis of material only recently declassified, this monograph is the most complete account of the establishment of the RDJTF thus far

Turning Point

The editors of this volume have assembled the world's foremost military authorities to reexamine the nature of warfare in the wake of the Persian Gulf War.

Turning Point

Now that the initial patriotic euphoria over the spectacular "Desert Storm" campaign has settled down, people are looking for more sophisticated accounts of the war and what it can teach us for the future. The editors of this volume have assembled the world's foremost military authorities to reexamine the nature of warfare in the wake of the Persian Gulf War. Not just a book for military specialists, Turning Point offers a broad perspective on the nature of warfare and its role in international politics. The chapters are all written in an engaging, jargon-free style by authors whose individual works have found wide general appeal. Furthermore, the authors offer significant elaborations upon their previous writings. For example, noted strategist Edward Luttwak offers a piece on his argument for an era of "geoeconomics." Joseph Nye expands on his notion of "soft power," Martin van Creveld refines the argument of his recent book The Transformation of War, and Thomas Schelling develops his analysis of nuclear weapons' strategic impact. The book features a gripping account of the ground war from John Keegan, the air war from Eliot Cohen, and the "endgame" from General John Cushman (including some criticism of Norman Schwarzkopf's planning). Covering a broad range of political-military subjects, from the development of U.S. military doctrine to the nature of combat in the Gulf and the future of security challenges in Europe and the Far East, these preeminent authors provide insightful analysis that makes Turning Point a superb source for everyone interested in U.S. foreign policy and strategy.

The Persian Gulf War

Yet military hardware is not the same as military power. ... Unlike both those
countries, the GCC states' primary security interest is to maintain stability and
security in the Arabian Peninsula and its ... it is simplistically assumed that the
GCC states would be willing to act as an American surrogate in maintaining Gulf
security.

The Persian Gulf War

The stability of the Persian Gulf is of great importance to the economies of the entire world--as amply demonstrated by recent events. This collection of essays surveys the state of the Persian Gulf in the wake of the 1980-88 Iran-Iraq War. By evaluating the geopolitical landscape of the Gulf, the book places into a clearer perspective the political, security, and diplomatic dimensions of the war. It also serves as a guide for reassessing those factors that affected the conflict's outcome and that will continue to influence developments in the region.

Gulf Security

Given the US relationship with Iran, it is unsurprising that their military preserve in
the region arouse Iranian fears, despite the recent reduction in US force levels in
the Gulf. Most of those in authority in Iran believe the US military presence is ...

Gulf Security


The Gulf Military Balance

July 30, 2008 – The Defense Security Cooperation Agency notified Congress of a
possible Foreign Military Sale to Iraq of ... support equipment, publications and
technical data, personnel training and training equipment, US Government and ...

The Gulf Military Balance

The United States faces major challenges in dealing with Iran, the threat of terrorism, and the tide of political instability in the Arabian Peninsula. The presence of some of the world’s largest reserves of oil and natural gas, vital shipping lanes, and Shia populations throughout the region have made the peninsula the focal point of US and Iranian strategic competition.