Habsburg Sons

www.academicstudiespress.com/cherryorchardbooks Habsburg Sons describes Jewish participation in the Habsburg Army , 1788-1918 , concentrating on World War I. Approximately 300,000-350,000 Jews fought in the Austro - Hungarian Armies on ...

Habsburg Sons

Habsburg Sons describes Jewish participation in the Habsburg Army, 1788-1918, concentrating on World War I. Approximately 300,000-350,000 Jews fought in the Austro-Hungarian Armies on all fronts; of these, 30,000–40,000 died of wounds or illness, and at least 17% were taken prisoner in camps all over Russia and Central Asia. Many soldiers were Orthodox Ostjuden, and over 130 Feldrabbiner (chaplains) served among them. Antisemitism was present but generally not overt. The book uses personal diaries and newspaper articles (most available in English for the first time) to describe their stories, and compares the experiences of Jews in German, Russian, and Italian armies.

Empress Maria Theresa and the Politics of Habsburg Imperial Art

She greatly admired Pompeo Batoni's double portrait of the Habsburg sons , which she may have known from prints , and commissioned a painted copy of it for her private art gallery . We can surmise that its appeal was more than just ...

Empress Maria Theresa and the Politics of Habsburg Imperial Art

"Explores the intersections between monarchy, gender, and art through an investigation of the visual and architectural culture of the eighteenth-century Habsburg empress Maria Theresa"--Provided by publisher.

Habsburg Sons

Setting the Stage -- Jews in the Armies of Austro-Hungary before the Great War: A Comparative Framework -- The Kaiser Needs You!

Habsburg Sons

Habsburg Sons describes Jewish participation in the Habsburg Army. 1788-1918, concentrating on World War I. Approximately 300,000-350,000 Jews fought in the Austro-Hungarian Armies. The book uses personal diaries and newspaper articles (most available in English for the first time) to describe their experiences.

A History of the Habsburg Empire 1526 1918

These claims were blocked at first by the mere existence of Albrecht's late - born son , Ladislas [ Posthumus ] ( 1440-1457 ) . Frederick could prevent the son's accession , but he could not secure his own . Foiled later by the powerful ...

A History of the Habsburg Empire  1526 1918

Describes, surveys, and discusses the major historical aspects of the Habsburg Empire - diplomatic, political, institutional, socioeconomic, and cultural.

A History of the Habsburg Empire 1273 1700

Albert's death was a disaster for the House of Austria and for Germany.2The power of the Habsburgs in the Upper Rhine ... excluded the Habsburgs for two centuries.3 THE RENUNCIATION OF THE GERMAN THRONE Albert of Habsburg's sons, ...

A History of the Habsburg Empire 1273 1700

The first part of a two-volume history of the Habsburg Empire from its medieval origins to its dismemberment in the First World War. This important volume (which is self-contained) meets a long-felt need for a systematic survey in English of the Habsburgs and their lands in the late medieval and early modern periods. It is primarily concerned with the Habsburg territories in central and northern Europe, but the history of the Spanish Habsburgs in Spain and the Netherlands is also covered. The book, like the Habsburgs themselves, deals with an immense range of lands and peoples: clear, balanced, and authoritative, it is a remarkable feat of synthethis and exposition.

Early Modern Habsburg Women

In the process, the imagery contributed to the Habsburg's deployment of Catholic beliefs and symbolism through the ... Indeed, the Austrian Habsburgs were famous for their fecundity: Empress María had given birth to sixteen children, ...

Early Modern Habsburg Women

As the first comprehensive volume devoted entirely to women of both the Spanish and Austrian Habsburg royal dynasties spanning the sixteenth and the seventeenth centuries, this interdisciplinary collection illuminates their complex and often contradictory political functions and their interrelations across early modern national borders. The essays in this volume investigate the lives of six Habsburg women who, as queens consort and queen regent, duchesses, a vicereine, and a nun, left an indelible mark on the diplomatic and cultural map of early modern Europe. Contributors examine the national and transnational impact of these notable women through their biographies, and explore how they transferred their cultural, religious, and political traditions as the women moved from one court to another. Early Modern Habsburg Women investigates the complex lives of Philip II’s daughter, the Infanta Catalina Micaela (1567-1597); her daughter, Margherita of Savoy, Vicereine of Portugal (1589-1655); and Maria Maddalena of Austria, Grand Duchess of Florence (1589-1631). The second generation of Habsburg women that the volume addresses includes Philip IV’s first wife, Isabel of Borbón (1602-1644), who became a Habsburg by marriage; Rudolph II’s daughter, Sor Ana Dorotea (1611-1694), the only Habsburg nun in the collection; and Philip IV’s second wife, Mariana of Austria (1634-1696), queen regent and mother to the last Spanish Habsburg. Through archival documents, pictorial and historical accounts, literature, and correspondence, as well as cultural artifacts such as paintings, jewelry, and garments, this volume brings to light the impact of Habsburg women in the broader historical, political, and cultural contexts. The essays fill a scholarly need by covering various phases of the lives of early modern royal women, who often struggled to sustain their family loyalty while at the service of a foreign court, even when protecting and preparing their heirs for rule a

War Religion and Court Patronage in Habsburg Austria

Noble families were certainly eager to have their sons serve the Habsburg rulers. Thus, towards of the end of the sixteenth century, more than half of the second-born sons of the upper nobility of the Austrian hereditary lands were ...

War  Religion and Court Patronage in Habsburg Austria

This case study of the causes of the Thirty Years' War suggests an alternative framework to that of Absolutism, and views statebuilding as an interactive bargaining process that can engender challenges to political authority. It shows how selective court patronage changed the cultural habits of nobles in education, manners, and tastes, but failed to transform religious identities, which were intimately tied to noble interests. Instead, the confessionalization of patronage deepened divisions within the elite, providing multiple incentives for the formation of an anti-Habsburg alliance among Protestants in 1620.

Danubia A Personal History of Habsburg Europe

Charles had no surviving male children, meaning that in the face of immense quantities of faithlessness and bloodshed, his daughter Maria Theresa (ruler of the Habsburg lands 1740–1780) battled to inherit a number oftitles while her ...

Danubia  A Personal History of Habsburg Europe

A charmingly personal history of Hapsburg Europe, as lively as it is informative, by the author of Germania For centuries much of Europe and the Holy Roman Empire was in the royal hands of the very peculiar Habsburg family. An unstable mixture of wizards, obsessives, melancholics, bores, musicians and warriors, they saw off—through luck, guile and sheer mulishness—any number of rivals, until finally packing up in 1918. From their principal lairs along the Danube they ruled most of Central Europe and Germany and interfered everywhere—indeed the history of Europe hardly makes sense without the House of Hapsburg. Danubia, Simon Winder's hilarious new book, plunges the reader into a maelstrom of alchemy, royalty, skeletons, jewels, bear-moats, unfortunate marriages and a guinea-pig village. Full of music, piracy, religion and fighting, it is the history of a strange dynasty, and the people they ruled, who spoke many different languages, lived in a vast range of landscapes, believed in rival gods and often showed a marked ingratitude towards their oddball ruler in Vienna. Readers who discovered Simon Winder's storytelling genius and infectious curiosity in Germania will be delighted by the eccentric and fascinating tale of the Habsburgs and their world.

Sons and Heirs

In the case of the Habsburgs, the Familienstatut of 1839 reinforced and codified traditional rules at a time when – because of his physical and mental problems – Emperor Ferdinand was considered more or less unfit to fulfil his duties ...

Sons and Heirs

Bringing together an international team of specialists, this volume considers the place of royal heirs within their families, their education and accommodation, their ability to overcome succession crises, the consequences of the death of an heir and finally the roles royal heirs played during the First World War.

The Sinews of Habsburg Power

Ernst Rüdiger and Gundaker Thomas were in turn the sons of Konrad Balthasar Starhemberg (1612–87), stadholder of Lower Austria at the time of Sabina Christina's union with Georg Julius Gilleis.” As Starhemberg satellites, the Gilleis ...

The Sinews of Habsburg Power

The Sinews of Habsburg Power explores the domestic foundations of the immense growth of central European Habsburg power from the rise of a permanent standing army after the Thirty Years' War to the end of the Napoleonic wars. With a force that grew irregularly in size from around 25,000 soldiers to as many as half a million in the War of the Sixth Coalition, the Habsburg monarchy participated in shifting international constellations of rivalry from western Europe to the Near East and in some two dozen, partly overlapping armed conflicts. Raising forces of such magnitude constituted a central task of Habsburg government, one that ultimately required the cooperation of society and its elites. The monarchy's composite-territorial structures in the guise of the Lower Austrian Estates -- a leading representative body and privileged corps -- formed a vital, if changing, element underlying Habsburg international success and resilience. With its capital at Vienna, the archduchy below the river Enns (the historic designation of Lower Austria) was geographically, politically, and financially a key Habsburg possession. Fiscal-military exigency induced the Estates to take part in new and evolving arrangements of power that served the purposes of government; in turn the Estates were able in previously little-understood ways and within narrowing boundaries to preserve vital interests in a changing world. The Estates survived because they were necessary, not only thanks to their increasing financial potency, but also because they offered a politically viable way of exacting ever-larger quantities of money, men, and other resources from local society. These circumstances would persist as ruling became more regularized, formalized, and homogenized, and as the very understanding of the Estates as a social and political phenomenon was evolving.

A Companion to Music at the Habsburg Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

Indeed, Ferdinand I's testament called for the division of the Habsburg patrimony among his three sons: Maximilian received Lower Austria and the crowns of Hungary and Bohemia, the Tyrol went to Archduke Ferdinand II (1529-95), ...

A Companion to Music at the Habsburg Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries

A Companion to Music at the Habsburgs Courts in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries, edited by Andrew H. Weaver, is the first in-depth survey of the Habsburg family’s musical patronage over a broad span of time.

The Habsburg Empire

In the final years of his reign, Ferdinand partitioned his possessions, in accordance with the Habsburg tradition of dividing up the dynasty's possessions among sons. Ferdinand's eldest son, Maximilian, who had been elected king of the ...

The Habsburg Empire

The Habsburgs are the most famous dynasty in continental Europe. From the thirteenth to the twentieth centuries, they ruled much of Central Europe, and for two centuries were also rulers of Spain. Through the Spanish connection, they acquired lands around the Mediterranean and a chunk of the New World, spreading eastwards to include the Philippines. Reaching from South-East Asia to what is now Ukraine, the Habsburg Empire was truly global. In this Very Short Introduction Martin Rady looks at the history of the Habsburgs, from their tenth-century origins in Switzerland, to the dissolution of the Habsburg Empire in 1918. He introduces the pantheon of Habsburg rulers, which included adventurers, lunatics, and at least one monarch who was so malformed that his true portrait could never be exhibited. He also discusses the lands and kingdoms that made up the Habsburg Empire, and the decisive moments that shaped their history. Dynasty, Europe, global power, and the idea of the multi-national state all converge on the history of the Habsburg Empire. Martin Rady shows how. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

The Habsburg Monarchy 1618 1815

Habsburg. empire. (1700—1740). The European powers had been preparing for Charles II's death for his entire ... Moreover, as the father of two healthy sons, Leopold enjoyed the luxury of promoting the candidacy of the younger Archduke ...

The Habsburg Monarchy  1618   1815

This is a revised and updated edition of a highly acclaimed history of the early modern Habsburg monarchy. Charles W. Ingrao challenges the conventional notion of Habsburg state and society as peculiarly backward by tracing its emergence as a military and cultural power of enormous influence. The Habsburg monarchy was undeniably different from other European polities: geography and linguistic diversity made this inevitable, but by 1789 it had laid the groundwork for a single polity capable of transcending its uniquely diverse cultural and historic heritage. Charles W. Ingrao unravels the web of social, political, economic and cultural factors that shaped the Habsburg monarchy during the period, and presents this complex story in a manner that is both authoritative and accessible to non-specialists. This edition includes a revised text and bibliographies, new genealogical tables, and an epilogue which looks forward to the impact of the Habsburg monarchy on twentieth-century events.

The Habsburg Empire 1700 1918

This was not because he wanted to reconstitute the monarchy ofCharles V. Since he hadtwo sons, he hoped togive up his rightsin favour of his younger son Charles who had been born in 1686, and to bring up his elder son Joseph, ...

The Habsburg Empire 1700 1918

This is the eagerly awaited second volume of Jean Bérenger's history of the Habsburgs. It covers the last two centuries of their rule and provides a compelling account of the fluctuations of Habsburg dynastic power and its disintegration after World War One. Bérenger gives a rich portrait of Habsburg greatness under Maria Theresa and Joseph II and shows how their successors proved more adroit at riding the tide of nationalism in their multi-ethnic empire than is often recognised.

Nutrition and Economic Development in the Eighteenth Century Habsburg Monarchy

of American slaves, who were taller than boys in the Habsburg Monarchy after age nine.” Only compared with that of London slum boys does the height of the Habsburg boys appear favorable. By twentieth-century standards, boys of the ...

Nutrition and Economic Development in the Eighteenth Century Habsburg Monarchy

John Komlos examines the industrial expansion of Austria from a fresh viewpoint and develops a new model for the industrial revolution. By integrating recent advances in the study of human biology and nutrition as they relate to physical stature, population growth, and levels of economic development, he reveals an intense Malthusian crisis in the Habsburg lands during the second half of the eighteenth century. At that time food shortages brought about by the accelerated population growth of the 1730s forced the government to adopt a reform program that opened the way for the beginning of the industrial revolution in Austria and in the Czech Crownlands. Comparing this "Austrian model" of economic growth to the industrial revolution in Britain, Komlos argues that the model is general enough to explain demographic and economic growth elsewhere in Europe--despite obvious regional differences. The main feature of the model is the interplay between a persistent, even if small, tendency to accumulate capital and a population with an underlying tendency to grow in numbers while remaining subject to Malthusian checks, particularly a limited availability of food. According to Komlos, modern economic growth in Europe began when the food constraint was finally lifted. Originally published in 1989. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Hitler and the Habsburgs

Following the Archduke's 1914 assassination, his sons became the owners of Konopiste and Chlumetz, properties he had ... When the Czechoslovakian government seized the “Habsburg” properties of his Hohenberg children, Franz Ferdinand was ...

Hitler and the Habsburgs

“A detailed and moving picture of how the Habsburgs suffered under the Nazi regime…scrupulously sourced, well-written, and accessible.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review) It was during five youthful years in Vienna that Adolf Hitler's obsession with the Habsburg Imperial family became the catalyst for his vendetta against a vanished empire, a dead archduke, and his royal orphans. That hatred drove Hitler's rise to power and led directly to the tragedy of the Second World War and the Holocaust. The royal orphans of Archduke Franz Ferdinand—offspring of an upstairs-downstairs marriage that scandalized the tradition-bound Habsburg Empire—came to personify to Adolf Hitler, and others, all that was wrong about modernity, the twentieth century, and the Habsburgs’ multi-ethnic, multi-cultural Austro-Hungarian Empire. They were outsiders in the greatest family of royal insiders in Europe, which put them on a collision course with Adolf Hitler. As he rose to power Hitler's hatred toward the Habsburgs and their diverse empire fixated on Franz Ferdinand's sons, who became outspoken critics and opponents of the Nazi party and its racist ideology. When Germany seized Austria in 1938, they were the first two Austrians arrested by the Gestapo, deported to Germany, and sent to Dachau. Within hours they went from palace to prison. The women in the family, including the Archduke's only daughter, Princess Sophie Hohenberg, declared their own war on Hitler. Their tenacity and personal courage in the face of betrayal, treachery, torture, and starvation sustained the family during the war and in the traumatic years that followed. Through a decade of research and interviews with the descendants of the Habsburgs, scholar James Longo explores the roots of Hitler's determination to destroy the family of the dead Archduke—and uncovers the family members' courageous fight against the Führer.

A Companion to Eighteenth Century Europe

Louis XIV outlived his son and eldest grandson, bequeathing the throne to a young great-grandson who required a ... the Austrian Habsburgs were biologically unlucky, losing rulers and heirs to smallpox and failing to produce sons, ...

A Companion to Eighteenth Century Europe

This Companion contains 31 essays by leading internationalscholars to provide an overview of the key debates oneighteenth-century Europe. Examines the social, intellectual, economic, cultural, andpolitical changes that took place throughout eighteenth-centuryEurope Focuses on Europe while placing it within its internationalcontext Considers not just major western European states, but also theoften neglected countries of eastern and northern Europe

Queen Mother and Stateswoman

Habsburg children saw their parents regularly but lived in the queen's side of the palace and grew up under her ... Philip respected this tradition during his son's minority, decreeing that the child-king would continue to live in his ...

Queen  Mother  and Stateswoman

When Philip IV of Spain died in 1665, his heir, Carlos II, was three years old. In addition to this looming dynastic crisis, decades of enormous military commitments had left Spain a virtually bankrupt state with vulnerable frontiers and a depleted army. In Silvia Z. Mitchell’s revisionist account, Queen, Mother, and Stateswoman, Queen Regent Mariana of Austria emerges as a towering figure at court and on the international stage, while her key collaborators—the secretaries, ministers, and diplomats who have previously been ignored or undervalued—take their rightful place in history. Mitchell provides a nuanced account of Mariana of Austria’s ten-year regency (1665–75) of the global Spanish Empire and examines her subsequent role as queen mother. Drawing from previously unmined primary sources, including Council of State deliberations, diplomatic correspondence, Mariana’s and Carlos’s letters, royal household papers, manuscripts, and legal documents, Mitchell describes how, over the course of her regency, Mariana led the monarchy out of danger and helped redefine the military and diplomatic blocs of Europe in Spain’s favor. She follows Mariana’s exile from court and recounts how the dowager queen used her extensive connections and diplomatic experience to move the negotiations for her son’s marriage forward, effectively exploiting the process to regain her position. A new narrative of the Spanish Habsburg monarchy in the later seventeenth century, this volume advances our knowledge of women’s legitimate political entitlement in the early modern period. It will be welcomed by scholars and students of queenship, women’s studies, and early modern Spain.

The Statistician and Economist

Son of Albert IV , Count of Habsburg 1273—1291 18 Adolphus I ... HOUSE OF NASSAU . Elected in opposition to Albert I ... 1292—1298 6 Albert I .. 1 HOUSE OF HABSBURG . Son of Rudolphus I ..... 1298-1308 10 Henry VII .. Louis IV .

The Statistician and Economist


McCarty s Annual Statistician

Son of Henry I. Otho I .. 44 66 Otho III . ... 1256-1273 800-814 14 814-840 26 840-843 843-876 880-887 887-899 899-911 HOUSE OF HABSBURG . Son of Albert IV , Count of Habsburg 1273-1291 HOUSE OF NASSAU . Elected in opposition to Albert ...

McCarty s Annual Statistician