Harlot s Ghost

Inside was a card in Harlot's immaculately small handwriting: “Your errant godfather.” I had solved the question by then. Even as Hugh is Harlot to some, so Angleton is Mother to many. But he is not my mother, Jessica Silverfield ...

Harlot s Ghost

With unprecedented scope and consummate skill, Norman Mailer unfolds a rich and riveting epic of an American spy. Harry Hubbard is the son and godson of CIA legends. His journey to learn the secrets of his society—and his own past—takes him through the Bay of Pigs, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the “momentous catastrophe” of the Kennedy assassination. All the while, Hubbard is haunted by women who were loved by both his godfather and President Kennedy. Featuring a tapestry of unforgettable characters both real and imagined, Harlot’s Ghost is a panoramic achievement in the tradition of Tolstoy, Melville, and Balzac, a triumph of Mailer’s literary prowess. Praise for Harlot’s Ghost “[Norman Mailer is] the right man to exalt the history of the CIA into something better than history.”—Anthony Burgess, The Washington Post Book World “Elegantly written and filled with almost electric tension . . . When I returned from the world of Harlot’s Ghost to the present I wished to be enveloped again by Mailer’s imagination.”—Robert Wilson, USA Today “Immense, fascinating, and in large part brilliant.”—Salman Rushdie, The Independent on Sunday “A towering creation . . . a fiction as real and as possible as actual history.”—The New York Times Praise for Norman Mailer “[Norman Mailer] loomed over American letters longer and larger than any other writer of his generation.”—The New York Times “A writer of the greatest and most reckless talent.”—The New Yorker “Mailer is indispensable, an American treasure.”—The Washington Post “A devastatingly alive and original creative mind.”—Life “Mailer is fierce, courageous, and reckless and nearly everything he writes has sections of headlong brilliance.”—The New York Review of Books “The largest mind and imagination [in modern] American literature . . . Unlike just about every American writer since Henry James, Mailer has managed to grow and become richer in wisdom with each new book.”—Chicago Tribune “Mailer is a master of his craft. His language carries you through the story like a leaf on a stream.”—The Cincinnati Post

New York Magazine

Harlot's Ghost, by Norman Mailer. Random House; 1,310 pages; $30. I LIKE THIS NOVEL, I REALLY DO, AND I'M not just saying that because I think Norman Mailer might hit me with it and hurt me. There is some material in Harlot's Ghost that ...

New York Magazine

New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.

Political Fiction and the American Self

14 The imagination of the state in Harlot's Ghost is , through and through , a cold war imagination , and so the inversion and frustration of Adamic simplicity begins with the title and runs through the novel .

Political Fiction and the American Self

Examining political novels that have achieved (or been denied) canonical status, John Whalen-Bridge demonstrates how Herman Melville, Jack London, Norman Mailer, Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, and Margaret Atwood have grappled with the problem of balancing radicalism and art. He shows that some books are more political than others, that some political novelists are more skillful than others, and that readers must allow for basic working distinctions between politics and aesthetics if we are to make useful judgments about which political novels to read, and why. "Whalen-Bridge demonstrates with clarity and power that the American political novel should not be ostracized but celebrated as a genre equal or superior to poetic and aesthetic ones." -- Tobin Siebers, author of Cold War Criticism and the Politics of Skepticism

For the Sake of Argument

She would not have been a liberal ; a courtesan is always a monarchist . ... Hubbard is a white collar type of CIA man , ' a ghost ' writer of planted texts , who is vicariously thrilled by the knowledge that he is working with ruthless ...

For the Sake of Argument

'For the sake of argument, one must never let a euphemism or a false consolation pass uncontested. The truth seldom lies, but when it does lie it lies somewhere in between.'. The global turmoil of the last few years has severely tested every analyst and commentator. Few have written with such insight as Christopher Hitchens about the large events - or with such discernment and with about the small tell-tale signs of a disordered culture. For the Sake of Argument ranges from the political squalor of Washington, as a beleaguered Bush administration seeks desperately to stave off disaster and Clinton prepares for power, to the twilight of Stalinism in Prague; from the Jewish quarter of Damascus in the aftermath of the Gulf War to the embattled barrios of Central America and the imperishable resistance of Saralevo, as a difficult peace is negotiated with ruthless foes. Hitchens' unsparing account of Western realpolitik in the end shows it to rest on delusion as well as deception. The reader will find in these pages outstanding essays on political asassination in America as well as a scathing review of the evisceration of politics by pollsters and spin-doctors. Hitchens' knowledge of the tortuous history of revolutions in the twentieth century helps him to explain both the New York intelligentsia's flirtation with Trotskyism and the frailty of Communist power structures in Eastern Europe. Hitchens' pointed reassessments of Graham Greene, P.G. Wodehouse and C.L.R. James, or his riotous celebration of drinkiny and smoking, display an engaging enthusiasm and an acerbic wit. Equally entertaining is his unsparing rogues' gallery, which gives us unforgettable portraits of the lugubrious 'Dr'Kissinger, the comprehensively reactionary 'Mother' Teresa, the preposterous Paul Johnson and the predictable P.J. O'Rourke.

New York Magazine

"A book is entirely useless if it is dry or dense, or doesn't communicate. The same is true for the ... In the fall of 1991, the publication of the Norman Mailer novel Harlot's Ghost achieved precisely that effect. Harlot's Ghost came ...

New York Magazine

New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.

Postmodern Sublime

2 “Alpha, Omega" and the Sublime Object of Technology That Mailer's 1991 novel Harlot's Ghost should end on page 1282 with the words “To BE CONTINUED" is perhaps the most fitting fulfillment of his long-projected novel of America.

Postmodern Sublime

Focusing on works by Norman Mailer, Thomas Pynchon, Joseph McElroy, and Don DeLillo, Joseph Tabbi finds that a simultaneous attraction to and repulsion from technology has produced a powerful new mode of modern writing—the technological sublime.

New York Magazine

Harlot's Ghost, by Norman Mailer. Random House; 1,310 pages; $30. I LIKE THIS NOVEL, I REALLY DO, AND I'M not just saying that because I think Norman Mailer might hit me with it and hurt me. There is some material in Harlot's Ghost that ...

New York Magazine

New York magazine was born in 1968 after a run as an insert of the New York Herald Tribune and quickly made a place for itself as the trusted resource for readers across the country. With award-winning writing and photography covering everything from politics and food to theater and fashion, the magazine's consistent mission has been to reflect back to its audience the energy and excitement of the city itself, while celebrating New York as both a place and an idea.

Conspiracy Theories in American History

This concern also permeates Mailer's massive novel Harlot's Ghost (1991), whose protagonist, a fictional member of the CIA named Harry Hubbard, has firsthand knowledge of three decades of cold war espionage. The CIA is represented as ...

Conspiracy Theories in American History

The first comprehensive history of conspiracies and conspiracy theories in the United States. * Over 300 A-Z entries on various events, ideas, and persons, as well as crucial supporting and refuting evidence, and competing explanations for the origins, history, and popularity of this mode of political thought * Primary documents from organizations promoting conspiracy theories * Contributions from over 100 international scholars with a full range of historical expertise * Separate section containing about 100 illustrative extracts covering the full range of American history, each with a brief headnote placing it in context

Norman Mailer

10.6 Authoritarian and Iconoclast 55 Harlot's Ghost also occupies the territory of those Mailer refers to as ' Wasps ' , White , Protestant Americans of English , Scottish , German , Dutch and Scandinavian descent .

Norman Mailer

This book is a comprehensive study of the work of the American author Norman Mailer, charting his response to critical events in his country's development since 1945. Focusing on Mailer's descriptions of World War II, 1960s counter-culture, the Vietnam War, the Apollo 11 mission and the execution of Gary Gilmore in Utah in 1977, the book analyses the native vernaculars in ten of his most critically acclaimed works. Moving beyond politically orientated scholarship, the author outlines Mailer's New York, American GI, Mid-West and Southern styles, contextualising his prose against earlier American authors, including Henry Adams, Ernest Hemingway and John Dos Passos, and positioning his writing alongside contemporary notables such as Joan Didion, William Burroughs and Truman Capote. Incorporating over forty years of scholarship in the form of articles, reviews and interviews, this book pinpoints the American attributes in Mailer's writing with a view to identifying trends in post-war American literary movements, the Beat Generation, New Journalism and Pop Art among others.

The Limits of Ferocity

In Harlot's Ghost, sexual aggression reflects political aggression but is subordinate to it. Harlot is Harry's ''surrogate father'' (13), and he comes wrapped in an enigma: is he an authority or an authoritarian? ''Our real duty is to ...

The Limits of Ferocity

A powerful critique of the revolutionary mentality and sexual aggression represented in the works of authors including D. H. Lawrence, Georges Bataille, Henry Miller, and Norman Mailer.

Reading for My Life

Harlot's. Ghost. IN. 1976 INNew York magazine, Mailer sneezed black-magic metaphors all over Watergate and the CIA, Marilyn Monroe and Howard Hughes, Kafka and the Mormons. At once a shaman and an exorcist, he changed shapes and split ...

Reading for My Life

Right up until his death in 2008, John Leonard was a lion in American letters. A passionate, erudite, and wide-ranging critic, he helped shape the landscape of modern literature. He reviewed the most celebrated writers of his age—from Kurt Vonnegut and Joan Didion to Toni Morrison and Thomas Pynchon. He championed Morrison’s work so ardently that she invited him to travel with her to Stockholm when she accepted her Nobel Prize. He also contributed many pieces on television, film, politics, and the media, which continue to surprise and impress with their fervor and prescience. Reading for My Life is a monumental collection of Leonard’s most significant writings—spanning five decades—from his earliest columns for the Harvard Crimson to his final essays for The New York Review of Books. Here are Leonard’s best writings—many never before published in book form—on the cultural touchstones of a generation, each piece a testament to his sharp wit, fierce intelligence, and lasting love of the arts. Definitive reviews of Doris Lessing, Vladimir Nabokov, Maxine Hong Kingston, Tom Wolfe, Don DeLillo, Milan Kundera, and Philip Roth, among others, display his passion and nearly encyclopedic knowledge of literature in the second half of the twentieth century. His essay on Ed Sullivan and the evolution of television remains a classic. Throughout Leonard’s reviews and essays is a dedicated political spirit, pleading for social justice, advocating for the women’s movement, and forever calling attention to writers whose work challenged and excited him. With an introduction by E. L. Doctorow and remembrances by Leonard’s friends, family, and colleagues, including Gloria Steinem and Victor Navasky, Reading for My Life stands as a landmark collection from one of America’s most beloved and influential critics.

Critical essays on the mith of the american Adam

Harlot's Ghost ( 1991 ) is a ghost story in many senses ; through its corridors run the ghosts of American political history , of the Cold War and of John F. Kennedy in particular . The narrator may or may not be a ghost .

Critical essays on the mith of the american Adam


The Best Novels of the Nineties

Harlot's Ghost (¡99¡); Random House ¡99¡ (HC); Ballantine ¡992 (pbk); SETTING: USA & Europe & Latin America ¡955–¡963 Harlot's Ghost features Harry Hubbard, a CIA operative with family connections. Both his father and godfather, ...

The Best Novels of the Nineties

This reader’s guide provides uniquely organized and up-to-date information on the most important and enjoyable contemporary English-language novels. Offering critically substantiated reading recommendations, careful cross-referencing, and extensive indexing, this book is appropriate for both the weekend reader looking for the best new mystery and the full-time graduate student hoping to survey the latest in magical realism. More than 1,000 titles are included, each entry citing major reviews and giving a brief description for each book.

The Enduring Vision of Norman Mailer

Harlot's Ghost looks back to the themes, even the situations, of his earlier books, primarily An American Dream, which I believe to be the key to his most fully realized works of the past quarter century. What, then, is it that makes ...

The Enduring Vision of Norman Mailer

Cultural Writing. THE ENDURING VISION OF NORMAN MAILER is Professor Barry H. Leeds' second book about one of America's most respected, most controversial, and most prolific authors. It looks at Mailer from where Leeds' first volume left off and takes him on through his most recent works. "Leeds' ideas are engaging, his enthusiasm infectious, and his prose mercifully free of critical jargon.Recommended for contemporary literature collections"--William Gargan in Library Journal. This is literary criticism with a heart and soul, and with an appreciation of subject which is so often missed in contemporary analysis.

Norman Mailer

is one of many reflections of the Protestant ethos that shapes life in the Agency. ... The coexistence and interdependence of good and evil runs through Mailer's work but receive supreme expression in Harlot's Ghost.

Norman Mailer

An American novelist, journalist, essayist, poet, playwright, screenwriter and film director, Norman Mailer won the Pulitzer Prize twice and the National Book Award once. Along with Joan Didion, Truman Capote, and Tom Wolfe, Mailer was a practitioner of New Journalism, a genre which encompassed the essay and other nonfiction writing.

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

The CIA novel, Harlot's Ghost, appeared in 1991. The sevenyear period between books is the longest such gap in Mailer's career to date. But Harlot's Ghost, at 1,300 pages, is also his longest work. It is also a crucial work for him in ...

The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature

Alphabetically arranged entries include discussions of individual authors, literary movements, institutions, notable texts, literary developments, themes, ethnic literatures, and "topic" essays.

Norman Mailer in Context

The novel shares a belief common to much postmodern fiction that “everything is connected.”29 Harlot's Ghost however is not an Arabian nights of the atomic age in the way that Gravity's Rainbow is, with its commitment to deep fabulistic ...

Norman Mailer in Context

This volume offers new insight into the breadth of contexts that inform Norman Mailer's body of work. It examines important literary, critical, theoretical, cultural, and historical frameworks for Mailer's writing, highlighting the ways his work reflects the concerns of twentieth and twenty-first century America. This book traces Mailer's literary influences; his contributions to a variety of literary genres; his participation in the American political sphere; the philosophical, religious, and gendered contexts that shape his work; and the iconic American figures he profiled. The book concludes with reflections on Mailer's literary and cultural legacy, emphasizing his advocacy for literary freedom and the contemporary resonance of his work.

A harlot s progress

I am rubbing my eyes to find out whether I am awake or asleep , answered the magistrate , whose countenance was pressed against the grating in the hope of catching a second glimpse of the ghost . ' In all probability she is under that ...

A harlot s progress


Imagining a Great Republic

Why the title Harlot's Ghost? The “ghost” part comes from Hubbard trying to understand whether the CIA or others knocked off Montague— or whether he may have defected to Russia. The “harlot” may have been borrowed from Balzac, ...

Imagining a Great Republic

In the first comprehensive reading of dozens of American literary and social culture classics, Tom Cronin, one of America’s most astute students of the American political tradition, tells the story of the American political experiment through the eyes of forty major novelists, from Harriet Beecher Stowe to Hunter S. Thompson. They have been moral and civic consciousness-raisers as we have navigated the zigs and zags, the successes and setbacks, and the slow awkward evolution of the American political experiment. Constitutional democracy, equal justice for all, the American Dream, and American Exceptionalism are all part of our country’s narrative. But, as Imagining a Great Republic explains, there has never been just a single American narrative—we have competing stories, just as we have competing American Dreams and competing ways of imagining a more perfect political union. Recognizing and understanding these competing values is a key part of being American. Cronin’s book explains how this is possible and why we should all be proud to be American.

Norman Mailer s Later Fictions

Rather than present a historically accurate, an ideologically correct, or a clichéd conspiracy-minded portrait of the CIA, Harlot's Ghost, according to its author, endeavors to “understand the tone of its inner workings” (1169).

Norman Mailer s Later Fictions

Norman Mailer s Later Fiction considers five works - Ancient Evenings (1983), Tough Guys Don t Dance (1984), Harlot's Ghost (1991), The Gospel According to the Son (1997), The Castle in the Forest (2007) - to examine, for the first time in a full volume, Mailer s literary maturity. Essays from esteemed scholars, Mailer's wife, andeditor, discuss Mailer s modes of cultural critique, connecting his political, theological, sexual, and aesthetic insights. This book will be essential reading for all Mailer scholars and offers provocative insights in such areas as postmodern American writing, masculinity studies, and the developing interface of literary and religious studies.