Heinrich Kaan s Psychopathia Sexualis 1844

Psyc HD PATH 1A EExu ALlso o TB44) A CLAssic T ExT IN TH E. o o Histo RY of SEXUALITY - HENRICH KAAN ED ITED EY B ENJAM 1 N KAHAN A TRAN SLATED EY ME Lissa HAY N Es Heinrich Kaan'sPsychopathia Sexualis” (1844) A volume in the series.

Heinrich Kaan s  Psychopathia Sexualis   1844

"With Heinrich Kaan's book we have then what could be called the date of birth, or in any case the date of the emergence, of sexuality and sexual aberrations in the psychiatric field." Michel Foucault, Abnormal: Lectures at the Collège de France, 1974–1975. Heinrich Kaan's fascinating work—part medical treatise, part sexual taxonomy, part activist statement, and part anti-onanist tract—takes us back to the origins of sexology. He links the sexual instinct to the imagination for the first time, creating what Foucault called "a unified field of sexual abnormality." Kaan's taxonomy consists of six sexual aberrations: masturbation, pederasty, lesbian love, necrophilia, bestiality, and the violation of statues. Kaan not only inaugurated the field of sexology, but played a significant role in the regimes of knowledge production and discipline about psychiatric and sexual subjects. As Benjamin Kahan argues in his Introduction, Kaan's text crucially enables us to see how homosexuality replaced masturbation as the central concern of Euro-American sexual regulation. Kaan's work (translated into English for the first time here) opens a new window onto the history of sexuality and the history of sexology and reconfigures our understanding of Richard von Krafft-Ebing's book of the same name, published some forty years later.

The Book of Minor Perverts

Heinrich Kaan, Heinrich Kaan'sPsychopathia Sexualis”: A Classic Text in the History of Sexuality (1844), ed. Benjamin Kahan, trans. Melissa Haynes (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2016), 82. Kaan, 82. I have adapted these paragraphs ...

The Book of Minor Perverts

-Statue-fondlers, wanderlusters, sex magicians, and nymphomaniacs: the story of these forgotten sexualities--what Michel Foucault deemed "minor perverts"--has never before been told. In The Book of Minor Perverts, Benjamin Kahan sets out to chart the proliferation of sexual classification that arose with the advent of nineteenth-century sexology. The book narrates the shift from Foucault's "thousand aberrant sexualities" to one: homosexuality. The focus here is less on the effects of queer identity and more on the lines of causation behind a surprising array of minor perverts who refuse to fit neatly into our familiar sexual frameworks. The result stands at the intersection of history, queer studies, and the medical humanities to offer us a new way of feeling our way into the past.

Decadence

Heinrich Kaan, Psychopathia sexualis, 1844, trans. Melissa Haynes (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2016), 44. 4. Vernon Lee and Clementina Anstruther-Thomson, Beauty and Ugliness, and Other Studies in Psychological Æsthetics ...

Decadence

Decadence, that flowering of a mannered literary style in France during the Second Empire, and in the last two decades of the nineteenth century in Britain, holds an endless fascination. Yet the ambiguity of the term 'decadence' and the challenges of identifying its practitioners make grasping its contours difficult. From the obsession with classical cultures, to the responses to the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 1980s and 1990s, this book offers one of the most comprehensive histories of literary Decadence. The essays here interrogate and expand the formal, geographical, and temporal frameworks for understanding Decadent literature, while offering a renewed focus on the role played by women writers. Featuring essays by leading scholars on sexuality, politics, science, translation, the New Woman, Russian and Spanish American Decadence, the influence of cinema on Decadence, and much more, it is essential reading for all those interested in the literature of the 1890s and Oscar Wilde.

Violent Sensations

Among the precursors, it is important to include the eponymous work by Heinrich Kaan published in 1844, ... a radically novel way of looking at sexual behavior; see Henrico [Heinrich] Kaan, Psychopathia sexualis (Leipzig: Voss, 1844).

Violent Sensations

Around the turn of the twentieth century, Vienna and Berlin were centers of scientific knowledge, accompanied by a sense of triumphalism and confidence in progress. Yet they were also sites of fascination with urban decay, often focused on sexual and criminal deviants and the tales of violence surrounding them. Sensational media reports fed the prurient public’s hunger for stories from the criminal underworld: sadism, sexual murder, serial killings, accusations of Jewish ritual child murder—as well as male and female homosexuality. In Violent Sensations, Scott Spector explores how the protagonists of these stories—people at society’s margins—were given new identities defined by the groundbreaking sciences of psychiatry, sexology, and criminology, and how this expert knowledge was then transmitted to an eager public by journalists covering court cases and police investigations. The book analyzes these sexual and criminal subjects on three levels: first, the expertise of scientists, doctors, lawyers, and scholars; second, the sensationalism of newspaper scandal and pulp fiction; and, third, the subjective ways that the figures themselves came to understand who they were. Throughout, Spector answers important questions about how fantasies of extreme depravity and bestiality figure into the central European self-image of cities as centers of progressive civilization, as well as the ways in which the sciences of social control emerged alongside the burgeoning emancipation of women and homosexuals.

Companion to Sexuality Studies

However, in a series of lectures in 1974–1975, Foucault moved that date earlier, to 1844, the year Heinrich Kaan's Psychopathia Sexualis was published (Foucault 2003; Kaan 2016). The following discussion begins there.

Companion to Sexuality Studies

An inclusive and accessible resource on the interdisciplinary study of gender and sexuality Companion to Sexuality Studies explores the significant theories, concepts, themes, events, and debates of the interdisciplinary study of sexuality in a broad range of cultural, social, and political contexts. Bringing together essays by an international team of experts from diverse academic backgrounds, this comprehensive volume provides original insights and fresh perspectives on the history and institutional regulatory processes that socially construct sex and sexuality and examines the movements for social justice that advance sexual citizenship and reproductive rights. Detailed yet accessible chapters explore the intersection of sexuality studies and fields such as science, health, psychology, economics, environmental studies, and social movements over different periods of time and in different social and national contexts. Divided into five parts, the Companion first discusses the theoretical and methodological diversity of sexuality studies.Subsequent chapters address the fields of health, science and psychology, religion, education and the economy. They also include attention to sexuality as constructed in popular culture, as well as global activism, sexual citizenship, policy, and law. An essential overview and an important addition to scholarship in the field, this book: Draws on international, postcolonial, intersectional, and interdisciplinary insights from scholars working on sexuality studies around the world Provides a comprehensive overview of the field of sexuality studies Offers a diverse range of topics, themes, and perspectives from leading authorities Focuses on the study of sexuality from the late nineteenth century to the present Includes an overview of the history and academic institutionalization of sexuality studies The Companion to Sexuality Studies is an indispensable resource for scholars, researchers, instructors, and students in gender, sexuality, and feminist studies, interdisciplinary programs in cultural studies, international studies, and human rights, as well as disciplines such as anthropology, psychology, history, education, human geography, political science, and sociology.

Sexual Myths of Modernity

Heinrich Kaan, Psychopathia Sexualis (Lipsia: Leopold Voss, 1844). Foucault mentioned him on a number of occasions in the discussion of nineteenth-century sexuality in his lectures at the Collège de France: for example, Michel Foucault, ...

Sexual Myths of Modernity

This ambitious and wide-ranging study of late-nineteenth- and twentieth-century culture and thought transverses texts of evolutionary biology, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, political propaganda, fiction, historiography of Nazism, and scholarship on comparative genocide to analyze the notion that mass violence is sexually motivated.

Civil Rights Amendments Act of 1979

... Heinrich Kaan's " Psychopathia Sexualis ” in 1844 gave " scientific ” legitimation to the psychologism of the age , which sought to determine the etiology and character of sexuality in all its manifestations , specifically with ...

Civil Rights Amendments Act of 1979


A Genealogy of Appetite in the Sexual Sciences

In his lecture series Abnormal, Foucault credits a work by Russian physician Heinrich Kaan titled Psychopathia Sexualis (1844) as “the first treatise of psychiatry to speak only of sexual psychopathology.”81 Kaan's text was almost ...

A Genealogy of Appetite in the Sexual Sciences

This book offers a genealogy of the medicalisation of sexual appetite in Europe and the United States from the nineteenth to twenty-first century. Histories of sexuality have predominantly focused on the emergence of sexual identities and categories of desire. They have marginalised questions of excess and lack, the appearance of a libido that dwindles or intensifies, which became a pathological object in Europe by the nineteenth century. Through a genealogical approach that draws on the writings of Michel Foucault, A Genealogy of Appetite in the Sexual Sciences examines key 'moments' in the pathologisation of sexuality and demonstrates how medical techniques assumed critical roles in shaping modern understandings of the problem of appetite. It examines how techniques of the patient case history, elixirs and devices, measurement, diagnostic manuals and pharmaceuticals were central to the medicalisation of sexual appetite. Jacinthe Flore argues that these techniques are significant for understanding how a concern with 'how much?' has transformed medical knowledge of sexuality since the nineteenth century. The questions of 'how much?', 'how often?' and 'how intense?' thus require a genealogical investigation that pays attention to the emergence of medical techniques, the transformation of forms of knowledge and their effects on the problematisations of sexual appetite.

Abnormal

we find the major nineteenth-century treatises on sexual psychopathology as the first realization of this task, the first being, as you know, Heinrich Kaan's Psychopathia sexualis published in Leipzig in 1844.

Abnormal

Michel Foucault remains the essential philosopher of the modern world Three decades after his death, Michel Foucault remains one of the towering intellectual figures of the last half-century. His works on sexuality, madness, the prison, and medicine are enduring classics. From 1971 until his death in 1984, Foucault gave public lectures at the famous Collège de France. These seminal events, attended by thousands, created the benchmarks for contemporary social enquiry. The lectures comprising Abnormal begin by examining the role of psychiatry in modern criminal justice, and its method of categorising individuals who “resemble their crime before they commit it.” Building on the themes of societal self-defence developed in earlier works, Foucault shows how defining “normality” became a prerogative of power in the nineteenth century, shaping the institutions—from the prisons to the family—meant to deal with “monstrosity,” whether sexual, physical, or spiritual. The Collège de France lectures add immeasurably to our appreciation and understanding of Foucault’s thought.

Sex between Body and Mind

For critical contextualization of these works see Oosterhuis, Stepchildren; Benjamin Kahan, ed., Heinrich Kaan'sPsychopathia Sexualis” (1844), trans. Melissa Haynes (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2016). 23.

Sex between Body and Mind

Ideas about human sexuality and sexual development changed dramatically across the first half of the 20th century. As scholars such as Magnus Hirschfeld, Iwan Bloch, Albert Moll, and Karen Horney in Berlin and Sigmund Freud, Wilhelm Stekel, and Helene Deutsch in Vienna were recognized as leaders in their fields, the German-speaking world quickly became the international center of medical-scientific sex research—and the birthplace of two new and distinct professional disciplines, sexology and psychoanalysis. This is the first book to closely examine vital encounters among this era’s German-speaking researchers across their emerging professional and disciplinary boundaries. Although psychoanalysis was often considered part of a broader “sexual science,” sexologists increasingly distanced themselves from its mysterious concepts and clinical methods. Instead, they turned to more pragmatic, interventionist therapies—in particular, to the burgeoning field of hormone research, which they saw as crucial to establishing their own professional relevance. As sexology and psychoanalysis diverged, heated debates arose around concerns such as the sexual life of the child, the origins and treatment of homosexuality and transgender phenomena, and female frigidity. This new story of the emergence of two separate approaches to the study of sex demonstrates that the distinctions between them were always part of a dialogic and competitive process. It fundamentally revises our understanding of the production of modern sexual subjects.

The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America

Heinrich Kaan's Psychopathia Sexualis (1844): A Classic Text in the History of Sexuality. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2016. ———. “Toward a World-System of Sexuality: Queer Weather and the Macro Environments of Sex.

The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America

Ultimately, The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America not only rewrites all dominant scholarly narratives of eighteenth-century sexual behavior but poses a major intervention into queer theoretical understandings of the relationship between sex and the subject.

Decadent Ecology in British Literature and Art 1860 1910

Heinrich Kaan, Psychopathia Sexualis, 1844, translated by Melissa Haynes (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2016), 44. Houle, “Animal, Vegetable, Mineral,” 94. Dennis Denisoff, “Ecology: the Vital Forces of Decay,” in Jane Desmarais ...

Decadent Ecology in British Literature and Art  1860   1910

Casting fresh light on late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century British art, literature, ecological science and paganism, Decadent Ecology reveals the pervasive influence of decadence and paganism on modern understandings of nature and the environment, queer and feminist politics, national identities, and changing social hierarchies. Combining scholarship in the environmental humanities with aesthetic and literary theory, this interdisciplinary study digs into works by Simeon Solomon, Algernon Swinburne, Walter Pater, Robert Louis Stevenson, Vernon Lee, Michael Field, Arthur Machen and others to address trans-temporal, trans-species intimacy; the vagabondage of place; the erotics of decomposition; occult ecology; decadent feminism; and neo-paganism. Decadent Ecology reveals the mutually influential relationship of art and science during the formulation of modern ecological, environmental, evolutionary and trans-national discourses, while also highlighting the dissident dynamism of new and recuperative pagan spiritualities - primarily Celtic, Nordic-Germanic, Greco-Roman and Egyptian - in the framing of personal, social and national identities.

Sex Lessons From History

Heinrich Kaan's 'Psychopathia Sexualis' (1844): A Classic Text in the History of Sexuality (Cornell Studies in the History of Psychiatry) (Cornell University Press, 2016). 7 The works of Rabelais, faithfully translated from the French ...

Sex  Lessons From History

Out now: the new book by Dr Fern Riddell, a powerful and entertaining history of sex. __________ These are the facts: throughout history human beings have had sex. Sexual culture did not begin in the sixties. It has always been celebrated, needed, wanted and desired part of what it means to be human. So: what can learn by looking at the sexual lives of our ancestors? What does it tell us about our attitudes and worries today, and how can the past teach us a better way of looking forward? In this wide-ranging and powerful new history of sex, Dr Fern Riddell will uncover the sexual lives of our ancestors and show that, just like us, they were as preoccupied with sexual identities, masturbation, foreplay, sex, deviance; facing it with the same confusion, joy and accidental hilarity that we do today. Sex: Lessons from History is a revealing and fascinating look at how we've always been obsessed with how sex makes us who we are. __________

Difference and Pathology

Heinrich Kaan , Psychopathia sexualis ( Leipzig : Leopold Voss , 1844 ) . See Foucault , History of Sexuality , pp . 63 , 118. My translation . In general , quotations are from translations indicated in the notes ; other translations ...

Difference and Pathology

A collection of essays dealing with stereotypes in language and in literary texts, especially those associating race with sexuality and pathology (organic disease or madness). The introduction (pp. 15-38) gives a psychological explanation of the need to create stereotypes of the Other and give them mythic negative characteristics in order to categorize and control the world. Negative stereotypes of Jews are discussed in ch. 6 (pp. 150-162), "The Madness of the Jews"; ch. 7 (pp. 162-174), "Race and Madness in I.J. Singer's 'The Family Carnovsky'"; ch. 8 (pp. 175-190), "Sigmund Freud and the Jewish Joke."

The Sexual Life of Our Time in Its Relations to Modern Civilization

Ivan Bloch. 458 Heinrich Kaan, “Psychopathia Sexualis” (Leipzig, 1844). 459 R. von Krafft-Ebing, “Psychopathia Sexualis” (Stuttgart, 1882).

The Sexual Life of Our Time in Its Relations to Modern Civilization

The author’s aim in writing this book was to write a complete Encyclopædia on the sexual sciences, and it will probably be acknowledged by all who study its pages that the author has accomplished his intention in a very scholarly manner, and in such form as to be of great value to the professions for whom this translation is intended. The subject is no doubt one which appeals to and affects the interests of all adult persons, but the publishers have, after very serious and careful consideration, come to the conclusion that the sale of the English translation of the book shall be limited to members of the legal and medical professions. To both these professions it is essential that a knowledge of the science of Sex and the various causes for the existence of “abnormals” should be ascertained, so that they may be guided in the future in their investigations into, and the practice of attempts to mitigate, the evil which undoubtedly exists, and to bring about a more healthy class of beings. It is the first time that the subject has been so carefully and fully gone into in the English language, and it is believed that the very exhaustive examination which the author has made into the matter, and the various cases to which he has called attention, will be of considerable use to the medical practitioner, and also to the lawyer in criminal and quasi-criminal matters, and probably in matrimonial disputes and cases of insanity.

The Government of Desire

The first treatise of psychiatry in German dedicated to sexuality and sexual abnormalities is Heinrich Kaan, Psychopathia Sexualis (Leipzig, 1844). 2 See Foucault, Abnormal, 49–52. 3 William I, Prince of Orange, also known as William ...

The Government of Desire

Liberalism, Miguel de Beistegui argues in The Government of Desire, is best described as a technique of government directed towards the self, with desire as its central mechanism. Whether as economic interest, sexual drive, or the basic longing for recognition, desire is accepted as a core component of our modern self-identities, and something we ought to cultivate. But this has not been true in all times and all places. For centuries, as far back as late antiquity and early Christianity, philosophers believed that desire was an impulse that needed to be suppressed in order for the good life, whether personal or collective, ethical or political, to flourish. Though we now take it for granted, desire as a constitutive dimension of human nature and a positive force required a radical transformation, which coincided with the emergence of liberalism. By critically exploring Foucault’s claim that Western civilization is a civilization of desire, de Beistegui crafts a provocative and original genealogy of this shift in thinking. He shows how the relationship between identity, desire, and government has been harnessed and transformed in the modern world, shaping our relations with others and ourselves, and establishing desire as an essential driving force for the constitution of a new and better social order. But is it? The Government of Desire argues that this is precisely what a contemporary politics of resistance must seek to overcome. By questioning the supposed universality of a politics based on recognition and the economic satisfaction of desire, de Beistegui raises the crucial question of how we can manage to be less governed today, and explores contemporary forms of counter-conduct. ​Drawing on a host of thinkers from philosophy, political theory, and psychoanalysis, and concluding with a call for a sovereign and anarchic form of desire, The Government of Desire is a groundbreaking account of our freedom and unfreedom, of what makes us both governed and ungovernable.

Lacan A Genealogy

The first treatise of psychiatry in German dedicated to sexuality and sexual abnormalities is Heinrich Kaan's own Psychopathia Sexualis (Leipzig, 1844). 45. J. Lacan and M. Cénac, E 147/120. 46. J. Lacan, S VII 219–20/187. 47.

Lacan  A Genealogy

Lacan: A Genealogy provides a genealogical account of Lacan's work as a whole, from his early writings on paranoid psychosis to his later work on the real and surplus enjoyment. Beistegui argues that Lacan's work requires an in-depth genealogy to chart and interpret the his key concept of desire. The genealogy is both a historical and critical approach, inspired by Foucault, which consists in asking how – that is, by what theoretical and practical transformations, by the emergence of which discourses of truth, which institutions, and which power relations – our current subjectivity was shaped. Desire is a crucial thread throughout because it lies at the heart not only of liberal political economy, psychiatry and psychopathology, and the various discourses of recognition (from philosophy to psychology and the law) that shape our current politics of identity, but also, and more importantly, of the manner in which we understand, experience and indeed govern ourselves, ethically and politically. A novel reading of Lacan that foregrounds the radicality and urgency of his concepts and the relationship between desire, norm and the law.

The Cambridge Companion to American Gay and Lesbian Literature

Historians of sexuality also point to previous significant events in the history of sexology, including Heinrich Kaan's publication of an earlier Psychopathia Sexualis in 1844; Karl Heinrich Ulrichs's use of Urning, a term roughly ...

The Cambridge Companion to American Gay and Lesbian Literature

This Companion examines the connections between LGBTQ populations and American literature from the late eighteenth to twenty-first centuries. It surveys primary and secondary writings under the evolving category of gay and lesbian authorship, and incorporates current thinking in US-based LGBTQ studies as well as critical practices within the field of American literary studies. This Companion also addresses the ways in which queerness pervades persons, texts, bodies, and reading, while paying attention to the transnational component of such literatures. In so doing, it details the chief genres, conventional historical backgrounds, and influential interpretive practices that support the analysis of LGBTQ literatures in the United States.

Foucault s Last Decade

This is a translation of a text that first appeared in Johann Heinrich Kopp, Jahrbuch der Staatsartzneikunde, vol. IX, Frankfurt, Hermann, 1817. ... Henrico [Heinrich] Kaan, Psychopathia sexualis, Lipsiae: Leopoldum Voss, 1844.

Foucault s Last Decade

On 26 August 1974, Michel Foucault completed work on Discipline and Punish, and on that very same day began writing the first volume of The History of Sexuality. A little under ten years later, on 25 June 1984, shortly after the second and third volumes were published, he was dead. This decade is one of the most fascinating of his career. It begins with the initiation of the sexuality project, and ends with its enforced and premature closure. Yet in 1974 he had something very different in mind for The History of Sexuality than the way things were left in 1984. Foucault originally planned a thematically organised series of six volumes, but wrote little of what he promised and published none of them. Instead over the course of the next decade he took his work in very different directions, studying, lecturing and writing about historical periods stretching back to antiquity. This book offers a detailed intellectual history of both the abandoned thematic project and the more properly historical version left incomplete at his death. It draws on all Foucault’s writings in this period, his courses at the Collège de France and lectures elsewhere, as well as material archived in France and California to provide a comprehensive overview and synthetic account of Foucault’s last decade.

Michel Foucault A Research Companion

214 In [A]: 266/{Ab}: 266, Foucault mentions the doctor Heinrich Kaan who in his Psychopathia sexualis from 1844 describes how excessive masturbation can lead to partial paralysis, total paralysis, and even brain tumors. on immediate ...

Michel Foucault  A Research Companion

Michel Foucault continues to be hugely influential. His diagnoses challenge us to rethink crucial phenomena such as madness, discipline, the human sciences, the state, neoliberalism, sexuality and subject formation. Based on his work in its entirety, and with special emphasis on his many recently published lecture series, this book provides an updated, comprehensive and original account of his thought. By reading Foucault as a philosopher, it offers an extensive systematic assessment and discussion of his unique conception of philosophical practice and brings a unifying trajectory in his work to light.