Hermann Cohen s Critical Idealism

A critical idealist in heart and soul, Cohen is also recognized as a man who embodied German Jewish culture. Publications on Cohen in the English language are small in number and this volume aims to fill the gap.

Hermann Cohen s Critical Idealism

Hermann Cohen (1842-1918) is an original systematic thinker and representative of the Marburg School of Critical Idealism. The Marburg School was a leading school in German academic philosophy and in German Jewish philosophy for a period of over thirty years preceding the First World War. Initially standing at the front of the ‘Return to Kant’ movement, Cohen subsequently went beyond Kant in developing a system of critical idealism in which he offered a critique of and alternative to absolute idealism, positivism, and materialism. A critical idealist in heart and soul, Cohen is also recognized as a man who embodied German Jewish culture. Publications on Cohen in the English language are small in number and this volume aims to fill the gap. It offers an analysis of Cohen’s System of Philosophy - the three-volume classic on logic, ethics, and aesthetics - and his writings on Judaism and religion. The book highlights Cohen’s contributions in these fields, including his discussions with Maimonides, Leibniz, Kant, and Hegel. It demonstrates the congeniality of Cohen’s critical idealism as expounded in the System and his writings on Judaism, and offers an overview of contemporary Cohen research.

Hermann Cohen s Critical Idealism

The question is therefore treated within the limits of this foundation.45 Cohen denies any philosophical justification to the metaphysical interest in mankind's progress . The question of progress or more generally of historical ...

Hermann Cohen s Critical Idealism

Hermann Cohen (1842-1918) is an original systematic thinker and representative of the Marburg School of Critical Idealism. The Marburg School was a leading school in German academic philosophy and in German Jewish philosophy for a period of over thirty years preceding the First World War. Initially standing at the front of the ‘Return to Kant’ movement, Cohen subsequently went beyond Kant in developing a system of critical idealism in which he offered a critique of and alternative to absolute idealism, positivism, and materialism. A critical idealist in heart and soul, Cohen is also recognized as a man who embodied German Jewish culture. Publications on Cohen in the English language are small in number and this volume aims to fill the gap. It offers an analysis of Cohen’s System of Philosophy - the three-volume classic on logic, ethics, and aesthetics - and his writings on Judaism and religion. The book highlights Cohen’s contributions in these fields, including his discussions with Maimonides, Leibniz, Kant, and Hegel. It demonstrates the congeniality of Cohen’s critical idealism as expounded in the System and his writings on Judaism, and offers an overview of contemporary Cohen research.

Critical Philosophy of Hermann Cohen The

Hermann Cohen's philosophy stood out in favor of the value of critical reason, on which scientific idealism, in the form of a revival of authentic rational idealism, is founded.

Critical Philosophy of Hermann Cohen  The

During the second half of the nineteenth century, the German philosophical scene had witnessed the extinction of absolute idealism and the predominance of the naive materialism of the adherents of scientism. Hermann Cohen's philosophy stood out in favor of the value of critical reason, on which scientific idealism, in the form of a revival of authentic rational idealism, is founded. His standpoint rejected the opposite extremes of both absolute idealism and naive materialism. The Marburg school, one of the great German philosophical schools at the turn of the century, grew out of Cohen's philosophy, which inspired a large number of twentieth-century thinkers. Cohen was, without doubt, one of the principal adherents of the "return to Kant" as a fundamental point of reference of "Critical Idealism." He based this revival on a long, historical, philosophical tradition, represented by Plato, Descartes, Leibniz, and others, apart from Kant himself.

Yearning for Form and Other Essays on Hermann Cohen s Thought

It represents one of the last expressions of great systematic thought. The papers collected in this volume deal with different aspects of Cohen’s thought, ethical, political, aesthetic and religious aspectsin particular.

Yearning for Form and Other Essays on Hermann Cohen s Thought

Hermann Cohen’s philosophy has now, finally, received the recognition it deserves. His thought undoubtedly has all the characteristics of a classic. It faced the great problems of philosophical tradition, with full critical awareness and at the same time, with the capacity to open up new, original routes. It represents one of the last expressions of great systematic thought. The papers collected in this volume deal with different aspects of Cohen’s thought, ethical, political, aesthetic and religious aspectsin particular. However they all represent attempts to follow the ubiquitous presence of certain important themes in Cohen and their capacity for containing meanings that cannot be limited to a single philosophical sphere: themes that are keys to reading unity of inspiration in his thought, which is more deeply imbedded than the exterior architectural unity of his work. The search for the fundamental themes behind Cohen is an important task, if we wish to see this philosopher as a present-day vital point of reference.

The Critical Philosophy of Hermann Cohen

F. Rosenzweig, Einleitung, in J I: 1, argues that, in this way, Cohen made a radical break with idealism, by rejecting reason as a principle. However, it has already been seen that the creator-creature relationship was not conceived by ...

The Critical Philosophy of Hermann Cohen

This is a translation from the Italian of a study of the work of Hermann Cohen, a figure generally recognized as the most significant Jewish thinker of the past 100 years.

The National Element in Hermann Cohen s Philosophy and Religion

Hermann Cohens neukantianischer Sozialismus und die sozialdemokratische ideologie im Kaiserreich,” in: Philosophisches Denken [s. below]. 1993: 257–269. Moos, Paul. ... Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism, Dordrecht 2005: 259–279.

The National Element in Hermann Cohen s Philosophy and Religion

Hermann Cohen was a Jewish-German thinker with a passion for philosophy. Two forms of national engagement influenced his philosophical system and his Jewish thought: a cultural-political 'Germanness' (Deutschtum) and a religious Judaism beyond the political.

Hermann Cohen

Moses, Stéphane and Wiedebach, Hartwig, eds., Hermann Cohen's Philosophy of Religion: International Conference in Jerusalem 1996. Hildesheim: Georg Olms Verlag, 1997. Munk, Reinier, ed., Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism.

Hermann Cohen

This book is the first complete intellectual biography of Hermann Cohen (1842-1918) and the only work to cover all his major philosophical and Jewish writings. Frederick C. Beiser pays special attention to all phases of Cohen's intellectual development, its breaks and its continuities, throughout seven decades. The guiding goal behind Cohen's intellectual career, he argues, was the development of a radical rationalism, one committed to defending the rights of unending enquiry and unlimited criticism. Cohen's philosophy was therefore an attempt to defend and revive the Enlightenment belief in the authority of reason; his critical idealism an attempt to justify this belief and to establish a purely rational worldview. According to this interpretation, Cohen's thought is resolutely opposed to any form of irrationalism or mysticism because these would impose arbitrary and artificial limits on criticism and enquiry. It is therefore critical of those interpretations which see Cohen's philosophy as a species of proto-existentialism (Rosenzweig) or Jewish mysticism (Adelmann and Kohnke). Hermann Cohen: An Intellectual Biography attempts to unify the two sides of Cohen's thought, his philosophy and his Judaism. Maintaining that Cohen's Judaism was not a limit to his radical rationalism but a consistent development of it, Beiser contends that his religion was one of reason. He concludes that most critical interpretations have failed to appreciate the philosophical depth and sophistication of his Judaism, a religion which committed the believer to the unending search for truth and the striving to achieve the cosmopolitan ideals of reason.

Reading Maimonides Philosophy in 19th Century Germany

Maimonidean Studies, 5 Vol., New York 1992–2008. Hyman, Arthur “Maimonidean Elements in Hermann Cohen's Philosophy of Religion”, in: Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism (ed. R. Munk), Dordrecht 2005. Ivry, Alfred L.: “Hermann Cohen, ...

Reading Maimonides  Philosophy in 19th Century Germany

This book investigates the re-discovery of Maimonides’ Guide of the Perplexed by the Wissenschaft des Judentums movement in Germany of the nineteenth and beginning twentieth Germany. Since this movement is inseparably connected with religious reforms that took place at about the same time, it shall be demonstrated how the Reform Movement in Judaism used the Guide for its own agenda of historizing, rationalizing and finally turning Judaism into a philosophical enterprise of ‘ethical monotheism’. The study follows the reception of Maimonidean thought, and the Guide specifically, through the nineteenth century, from the first beginnings of early reformers in 1810 and their reading of Maimonides to the development of a sophisticated reform-theology, based on Maimonides, in the writings of Hermann Cohen more then a hundred years later.

Monotheism and Tolerance

In Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism, ed. Reinier Munk. Dordrecht: Springer, 2005. 3–40. ———. “Ethik als Lehre vom Menschen: Eine Einführung in Hermann Cohens Ethik des Reinen Willens.” Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 13 ...

Monotheism and Tolerance

Why are religious tolerance and pluralism so difficult to achieve? Why is the often violent fundamentalist backlash against them so potent? Robert Erlewine looks to a new religion of reason for answers to these questions. Drawing on Enlightenment writers Moses Mendelssohn, Immanuel Kant, and Hermann Cohen, who placed Christianity and Judaism in tension with tolerance and pluralism, Erlewine finds a way to break the impasse, soften hostilities, and establish equal relationships with the Other. Erlewine's recovery of a religion of reason stands in contrast both to secularist critics of religion who reject religion for the sake of reason and to contemporary religious conservatives who eschew reason for the sake of religion. Monotheism and Tolerance suggests a way to deal with the intractable problem of religiously motivated and justified violence.

Lament in Jewish Thought

Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism. Dordrecht: Springer, 2005. Ng, Julia. “Walter Benjamin's and Gershom Scholem's Reading Group Around Hermann Cohen's Kants Theorie der Erfahrung in 1918: An Introduction.” MLN 127 (2012a): 433– 439. –.

Lament in Jewish Thought

Lament, mourning, and the transmissibility of a tradition in the aftermath of destruction are prominent themes in Jewish thought. The corpus of lament literature, building upon and transforming the biblical Book of Lamentations, provides a unique lens for thinking about the relationships between destruction and renewal, mourning and remembrance, loss and redemption, expression and the inexpressible. This anthology features four texts by Gershom Scholem on lament, translated here for the first time into English. The volume also includes original essays by leading scholars, which interpret Scholem’s texts and situate them in relation to other Weimar-era Jewish thinkers, including Walter Benjamin, Franz Rosenzweig, Franz Kafka, and Paul Celan, who drew on the textual traditions of lament to respond to the destruction and upheavals of the early twentieth century. Also included are studies on the textual tradition of lament in Judaism, from biblical, rabbinic, and medieval lamentations to contemporary Yemenite women’s laments. This collection, unified by its strong thematic focus on lament, shows the fruitfulness of studying contemporary and modern texts alongside the traditional textual sources that informed them.

Yearning for Form and Other Essays on Hermann Cohen s Thought

On the one hand , Cohen's thought belongs to the philosophical tradition we could describe as « Kantian » , but which it would be better to call « critical idealism » , since opinion is now unanimous that Cohen's philosophy is much more ...

Yearning for Form and Other Essays on Hermann Cohen s Thought

A collection of papers, this volume deals with different aspects of Cohen's thought, ethical, political, aesthetic, and religious aspects in particular. It represents attempts to follow the ubiquitous presence of certain important themes in Cohen and their capacity for containing meanings that cannot be limited to a single philosophical sphere.

Exemplarity and Chosenness

See also Fiorato and Wiedebach, “Rosenzweig's Readings of Hermann Cohen's Logic of Pure Cognition,” Journal of ... For a detailed discussion of Cohen's “critical idealism,” see Andrea Poma, The Critical Philosophy of Hermann Cohen ...

Exemplarity and Chosenness

Exemplarity and Chosenness is a combined study of the philosophies of Jacques Derrida (1930-2004) and Franz Rosenzweig (1886-1929) that explores the question: How may we account for the possibility of philosophy, of universalism in thinking, without denying that all thinking is also idiomatic and particular? The book traces Derrida's interest in this topic, particularly emphasizing his work on "philosophical nationality" and his insight that philosophy is challenged in a special way by its particular "national" instantiations and that, conversely, discourses invoking a nationality comprise a philosophical ambition, a claim to being "exemplary." Taking as its cue Derrida's readings of German-Jewish authors and his ongoing interest in questions of Jewishness, this book pairs his philosophy with that of Franz Rosenzweig, who developed a theory of Judaism for which election is essential and who understood chosenness in an "exemplarist" sense as constitutive of human individuality as well as of the Jews' role in universal human history.

New Directions in Jewish Philosophy

A point made by Michael Zank in his article “Cohen, Hermann,” in Rout- ledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy, ... “Jurisprudence Is the Organon of Ethics: Kant and Cohen on Ethics, Law, and Religion,” in Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism, ...

New Directions in Jewish Philosophy

Breaking with strictly historical or textual perspectives, this book explores Jewish philosophy as philosophy. Often regarded as too technical for Judaic studies and too religious for philosophy departments, Jewish philosophy has had an ambiguous position in the academy. These provocative essays propose new models for the study of Jewish philosophy that embrace wider intellectual arenas—including linguistics, poetics, aesthetics, and visual culture—as a path toward understanding the particular philosophic concerns of Judaism. As they reread classic Jewish texts, the essays articulate a new set of questions and demonstrate the vitality and originality of Jewish philosophy.

100 years of European Philosophy Since the Great War

In Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism, ed. Reinier Munk, 193–230. Amsterdam: Springer. Goodenough, Erwin. 1962. An Introduction to Philo Judaeus. New Haven: Yale University Press. Gordon, Peter Eli. 2003. Rosenzweig and Heidegger.

100 years of European Philosophy Since the Great War

This book is a collection of specifically commissioned articles on the key continental European philosophical movements since 1914. It shows how each of these bodies of thought has been shaped by their responses to the horrors set in train by World War I, and considers whether we are yet ‘post-post-war’. The outbreak of World War I in August 1914,set in chain a series of crises and re-configurations, which have continued to shape the world for a century: industrialized slaughter, the end of colonialism and European empires, the rise of the USA, economic crises, fascism, Soviet Marxism, the gulags and the Shoah. Nearly all of the major movements in European thinking (phenomenology, psychoanalysis, Hegelianism, Marxism, political theology, critical theory and neoliberalism) were forged in, or shaped by, attempts to come to terms with the global trauma of the World Wars. This is the first book to describe the development of these movements after World War I, and as such promises to be of interest to philosophers and historians of philosophy around the world.

Ethics Out of Law

Hermann Cohen and the “Neighbor” Dana Hollander ... As has been much discussed, Cohen's “critical idealism” is based on an interpretation of Kant that privileges thought and concept over intuition and that engages in a critique of ...

Ethics Out of Law

This is the first book in English to lay out the philosophical ethics and philosophy of law of Hermann Cohen, one of the leading figures in both Neo-Kantian and Jewish philosophy.

The Genesis of Neo Kantianism 1796 1880

... Cohen and the Marburg School in Context', in Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism, ed. Reinier Munk. Dordrecht: Springer, 2005, pp. 3–41. Kalmar, Ivan, “The Völkerpsychologie of Lazarus and Steinthal and the Modern Concept of Culture', ...

The Genesis of Neo Kantianism  1796 1880

Frederick C. Beiser tells the story of the emergence of neo-Kantianism from the late 1790s until the 1880s. He focuses on neo-Kantianism before official or familiar neo-Kantianism, i.e., before the formation of the various schools of neo-Kantianism in the 1880s and 1890s (which included the Marburg school, the Southwestern school, and the Göttingen school). Beiser argues that the source of neo-Kantianism lies in three crucial but neglected figures: Jakob Friedrich Fries,

Rethinking the Messianic Idea in Judaism

Hermann Cohen, “Die Bedeutung des Judentums für den religiösen Fortschritt der Menschheit,” in Jüdische Schriften I, ... on Future and History in Hermann Cohen's Anti-Eschatological Messianism,” in Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism, ed.

Rethinking the Messianic Idea in Judaism

Over the centuries, the messianic tradition has provided the language through which modern Jewish philosophers, socialists, and Zionists envisioned a utopian future. Michael L. Morgan, Steven Weitzman, and an international group of leading scholars ask new questions and provide new ways of thinking about this enduring Jewish idea. Using the writings of Gershom Scholem, which ranged over the history of messianic belief and its conflicted role in the Jewish imagination, these essays put aside the boundaries that divide history from philosophy and religion to offer new perspectives on the role and relevance of messianism today.

Hermann Cohen and the Crisis of Liberalism

See LrE, 60; Reinier Munk, “Alterity in Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism,” Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy (JJTP) 9 (2000): 251–65. The judgment of “origin” (Ursprung), which is the immanent principle of thinking, ...

Hermann Cohen and the Crisis of Liberalism

Hermann Cohen (1842–1918) is often held to be one of the most important Jewish philosophers of the nineteenth century. Paul E. Nahme, in this new consideration of Cohen, liberalism, and religion, emphasizes the idea of enchantment, or the faith in and commitment to ideas, reason, and critique—the animating spirits that move society forward. Nahme views Cohen through the lenses of the crises of Imperial Germany—the rise of antisemitism, nationalism, and secularization—to come to a greater understanding of liberalism, its Protestant and Jewish roots, and the spirits of modernity and tradition that form its foundation. Nahme’s philosophical and historical retelling of the story of Cohen and his spiritual investment in liberal theology present a strong argument for religious pluralism and public reason in a world rife with populism, identity politics, and conspiracy theories.

Modernism Between Benjamin and Goethe

Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky, 'Hanging over the Abyss: On the Relation between Knowledge and Experience in Hermann Cohen and Walter Benjamin', in Hermann Cohen's Critical Idealism, ed. Reinier Munk (Dordrecht: Springer, 2005), 162–3.

Modernism Between Benjamin and Goethe

Widely regarded as one of the foremost cultural critics of the last century, Walter Benjamin's relation to Modernism has largely been understood in the context of his reception of the aesthetic theories of Early German Romanticism and his associated interest in avant-garde Surrealism. But this Romantic understanding only gives half the picture. Running through Benjamin's thought is also a critique of Romanticism, developed in conjunction with a positive engagement with the philosophical, artistic and historical writings of J. W. von Goethe. In demonstrating the significance of these Goethean elements, this book challenges the dominant understanding of Benjamin's philosophy as essentially Romantic and instead proposes that Goethe's Classicism, conceived as the counterpoint to Romanticism, permits a corrective to the latter's deficiencies. Benjamin's Modernist concept of criticism, it is argued, is constituted in the movement between these polarities of Romanticism and Classicism. Conversely, placing Goethe's Classicism in relation to Benjamin's practice of literary criticism reveals historical tensions with Romanticism that constitute the untimely – indeed, it will be argued, cinematic – Modernism of his work. Adopting a transcritical approach, this book alternates between Benjamin and Goethe in relation to the experiences of colour, language and technology, assembling a constellation of philosophical and artistic figures between them, including the writings of Kant, Nietzsche, Cohen, Deleuze, Koselleck, Klages, and the work of Grünewald, Marées, Klee, Turner, Hulme, Eisenstein, Tretyakov, and Murnau.