Hermetic Magic

The Postmodern Magical Papyrus of Abaris Stephen Flowers. Part I A History of Hermetic Magic 11 ORIGINS nost The kind of magic and philosophy we now. PART I: A HISTORY OF HERMETIC MAGIC.

Hermetic Magic

The Egyptians worshipped their own gods with particular rituals. This translation of The Magical Papyrus of Abaris shows modern seekers how to perform their own ritual celebrations of life.

The Metamorphosis of Magic from Late Antiquity to the Early Modern Period

1 monic magic contains as many explicit invocations as Hermetic magic , and sometimes even more . Its rituals seem more complex , even nigromantic , for reading through them , one notices such distinctive features as circles , candles ...

The Metamorphosis of Magic from Late Antiquity to the Early Modern Period

Deities, demons, and angels became important protagonists in the magic of the Late Antique world, and were also the main reasons for the condemnation of magic in the Christian era. Supplicatory incantations, rituals of coercion, enticing suffumigations, magical prayers and mystical songs drew spiritual powers to the humain domain. Next to the magician's desire to regulate fate and fortune, it was the communion with the spirit world that gave magic the potential to purify and even deify its practitioners. The sense of elation and the awareness of a metaphysical order caused magic to merge with philosophy (notably Neoplatonism). The heritage of Late Antique theurgy would be passed on to the Arab world, and together with classical science and learning would take root again in the Latin West in the High Middle Ages. The metamorphosis of magic laid out in this book is the transformation of ritual into occult philosophy against the background of cultural changes in Judaism, Graeco-Roman religion and Christianity. This volume, the first in the new series Groningen Studies in Cultural Change, offers the papers presented at the workshop The Metamorphosis of Magic from Late Antiquity to the Early Modern Period held from 22 to 24 June 2000, and organised by Jan N. Bremmer and Jan R. Veenstra. The papers have been written by scholars from such varying disciplines as classics, theology, philosophy, cultural history, and law. Their contributions shed new light upon several old obscurities; they show magic to be a significant area of culture, and they advance the case for viewing transformations in the lore and practice of magic as a barometer with which to measure cultural change.

Magical Transformations on the Early Modern English Stage

Hermetic Miracles in Sicily Shakespeare alters his source text not only by including an account of the Catholic rituals in ... Paulina insists that the context of the final scene is magical, but she qualifies this magic as spiritual and ...

Magical Transformations on the Early Modern English Stage

Magical Transformations on the Early Modern Stage furthers the debate about the cultural work performed by representations of magic on the early modern English stage. It considers the ways in which performances of magic reflect and feed into a sense of national identity, both in the form of magic contests and in its recurrent linkage to national defence; the extent to which magic can trope other concerns, and what these might be; and how magic is staged and what the representational strategies and techniques might mean. The essays range widely over both canonical plays-Macbeth, The Tempest, The Winter’s Tale, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Doctor Faustus, Bartholomew Fair-and notably less canonical ones such as The Birth of Merlin, Fedele and Fortunio, The Merry Devil of Edmonton, The Devil is an Ass, The Late Lancashire Witches and The Witch of Edmonton, putting the two groups into dialogue with each other and also exploring ways in which they can be profitably related to contemporary cases or accusations of witchcraft. Attending to the representational strategies and self-conscious intertextuality of the plays as well as to their treatment of their subject matter, the essays reveal the plays they discuss as actively intervening in contemporary debates about witchcraft and magic in ways which themselves effect transformation rather than simply discussing it. At the heart of all the essays lies an interest in the transformative power of magic, but collectively they show that the idea of transformation applies not only to the objects or even to the subjects of magic, but that the plays themselves can be seen as working to bring about change in the ways that they challenge contemporary assumptions and stereotypes.

Magic and the Dignity of Man

In her Bruno book, after noting the importance of Warburg's “unique library” in the preface, she did not develop his ideas about magic.26 Pico, she claimed, reinforced Ficino's Neoplatonic and Hermetic magic with Jewish wisdom to create ...

Magic and the Dignity of Man

Pico della Mirandola, one of the most remarkable thinkers of the Renaissance, has become known as a founder of humanism and a supporter of secular rationality. Brian Copenhaver upends this understanding of Pico, unearthing the magic and mysticism in the most famous work attributed to him, The Oration on the Dignity of Man.

Magic in the Cloister

For an extensive list of Hermetic texts in surviving manuscripts, see L-PC. Editions of Hermetic magic texts are forthcoming in Vittoria Perrone Compagni, Scripta Magica, CCCM 145 (Hermes Latinus V), Turnhout. On the Arabic roots of the ...

Magic in the Cloister

During the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries a group of monks with occult interests donated what became a remarkable collection of more than thirty magic texts to the library of the Benedictine abbey of St. Augustine's in Canterbury. The monks collected texts that provided positive justifications for the practice of magic and books in which works of magic were copied side by side with works of more licit genres. In Magic in the Cloister, Sophie Page uses this collection to explore the gradual shift toward more positive attitudes to magical texts and ideas in medieval Europe. She examines what attracted monks to magic texts, works, and how they combined magic with their intellectual interests and monastic life. By showing how it was possible for religious insiders to integrate magical studies with their orthodox worldview, Magic in the Cloister contributes to a broader understanding of the role of magical texts and ideas and their acceptance in the late Middle Ages.

Making Magic

Religion, Magic, and Science in the Modern World Randall Styers ... While Yates acknowledged that there were important differences between hermetic magical thought and “genuine science,” she argued that various strands of hermetic ...

Making Magic

Since the emergence of religious studies and the social sciences as academic disciplines, the concept of "magic" has played a major role in defining religion and in mediating the relation of religion to science. Across these disciplines, magic has regularly been configured as a definitively non-modern phenomenon, juxtaposed to distinctly modern models of religion and science. Yet this notion of magic has remained stubbornly amorphous. In Making Magic, Randall Styers seeks to account for the extraordinary vitality of scholarly discourse purporting to define and explain magic despite its failure to do just that. He argues that this persistence can best be explained in light of the Western drive to establish and secure distinctive norms for modern identity, norms based on narrow forms of instrumental rationality, industrious labor, rigidly defined sexual roles, and the containment of wayward forms of desire. Magic has served to designate a form of alterity or deviance against which dominant Western notions of appropriate religious piety, legitimate scientific rationality, and orderly social relations are brought into relief. Scholars have found magic an invaluable tool in their efforts to define the appropriate boundaries of religion and science. On a broader level, says Styers, magical thinking has served as an important foil for modernity itself. Debates over the nature of magic have offered a particularly rich site at which scholars have worked to define and to contest the nature of modernity and norms for life in the modern world.

Inside a Magical Lodge

In England and Scotland, a number of educated men interested in the traditions of Hermetic magic discovered the stonemasons' lodges in their communities, and leapt to the conclusion that these lodges were a survival of secret traditions ...

Inside a Magical Lodge

For centuries, magical lodges have been one of the most important and least understood parts of the Western esoteric traditions. The traditional secrecy of lodge organizations has made it next to impossible for modern students of magic to learn what magical lodges do, and how their powerful and effective traditions of ritual, symbolism and organization can be put to work. This updated and expanded edition of Inside a Magical Lodge reveals the foundations of lodge work on all levels-from the framework of group structure that allows lodges to efficiently handle the practical needs of a working magical group, through the subtle approaches to symbolism and ritual developed within lodge circles, to the potent magical methods that lodges use in their initiations and other ceremonial workings. It is a must-read for members of existing lodges, for students of magical traditions such as the Golden Dawn, for practitioners of other kinds of group magical work and for all those who have wondered about the hidden world behind lodge doors.

Wicca and the Christian Heritage

Should it be Celtic, Hermetic, Wiccan or some other synthesis? (Davies, 1999: 28–9) These extracts from letters and articles outline the confusion of conflicting ideas about magic and its place in contemporary Paganism, Wicca, ...

Wicca and the Christian Heritage

What is Wicca? Is it witchcraft, Paganism, occultism, esotericism, magic, spirituality, mysticism, nature religion, secrecy, gnosis, the exotic or 'other'? Wicca has been defined by and explored within all these contexts over the past thirty years by anthropologists, sociologists and historians, but there has been a tendency to sublimate and negate the role of Christianity in Wicca's historical and contemporary contexts. Joanne Pearson 'prowls the borderlands of Christianity' to uncover the untold history of Wicca. Exploring the problematic nature of the Wiccan claim of marginality, it contains a groundbreaking analysis of themes in Christian traditions that are inherent in the development of contemporary Wicca. These focus on the accusations which have been levelled against Catholisicm, heterodoxy and witchcraft throughout history: ritual, deviant sexuality and magic.

John Dee Interdisciplinary Studies in English Renaissance Thought

Here she identifies the specific texts of the Hermetic corpus as the “vital core of Renaissance thought on nature” and linked them very directly to the start of the Scientific Revolution through the Hermetic conception of magic.20 In ...

John Dee  Interdisciplinary Studies in English Renaissance Thought

Intellectual History and the Identity of John Dee In April 1995, at Birkbeck College, University of London, an interdisciplinary colloquium was held so that scholars from diverse fields and areas of expertise could 1 exchange views on the life and work of John Dee. Working in a variety of fields – intellectual history, history of navigation, history of medicine, history of science, history of mathematics, bibliography and manuscript studies – we had all been drawn to Dee by particular aspects of his work, and participating in the colloquium was to c- front other narratives about Dee’s career: an experience which was both bewildering and instructive. Perhaps more than any other intellectual figure of the English Renaissance Dee has been fragmented and dispersed across numerous disciplines, and the various attempts to re-integrate his multiplied image by reference to a particular world-view or philosophical outlook have failed to bring him into focus. This volume records the diversity of scholarly approaches to John Dee which have emerged since the synthetic accounts of I. R. F. Calder, Frances Yates and Peter French. If these approaches have not succeeded in resolving the problematic multiplicity of Dee’s activities, they will at least deepen our understanding of specific and local areas of his intellectual life, and render them more historiographically legible.

Labeling

Advocates of this thesis of continuity have stressed the formative roles played by natural magic in the emergence of early ... While Yates acknowledged that there were important differences between hermetic magical thought and ' genuine ...

Labeling

A diverse group of contributors, from the fields of education, psychology, philosophy and cultural studies, explore the social phenomenon of labeling. The authors question the nature of labeling, its contexts and processes, looking in particular at its prescriptive and confining effects. The assumption that labels are neutral and applied neutrally is rejected as the political nature of labeling is revealed. Topics discussed by the contributors include: *the politics of labeling *whiteness as a label for western cultural politics *labeling in institutions *popular culture and labeling *school communities and classrooms and the politics of labeling *labeling and race *sexual labelings *the impact of categorization on our children *labeling in the special education system *immigrants and limited English proficiency groups. Contributors include: Michael Apple, Peter McLaren, Cameron McCarthy and Maxine Greene.

Tragedy and After

Instead , he associates the " resurrection ” scene with the kind of Hermetic magic of which Bruno had been the major spokesman during his lifetime . As though remembering the punishment in store for those involved in black magic ...

Tragedy and After


The Lore of the Bard

Plus , according to the principles of high druidic / bardic magic , this is sufficient , because the power of ... In that sense , it is very similar to the old Hermetic magical tradition , which strongly emphasizes utilizing a mental ...

The Lore of the Bard

The only book available on the complete practice of the Celtic bard, this title is designed for anyone drawn to the enchantment of Celtic music, myth, and poetry.

The Encyclopedia of Magic and Alchemy

Most Hermetic writings were done during the first four centuries after Christ; some were written even later. ... Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn The most influential secret society in the Western magical tradition.

The Encyclopedia of Magic and Alchemy

A comprehensive illustrated reference guide with more than 400 entries on the subjects of magic and alchemy.

Magic Symbols and Texts of Magic

These correlation tables are not only necessary to interpret the Hermetic magic symbols and narratives, but also to decipher the magical ideograms. Generally speaking, one can say, magic was the first human practice in making practical ...

Magic  Symbols and Texts of Magic

Here, the magic is studied in its linguistic and semiotic aspects and is defined as well: Magic is objectified language and symbols to operate with power over the world by a magician to the particular interest of an user into a community, whose interaction constitutes a system. The study demands specific and analytical tools as well: 1. The Linguistics and Semiotics to study the expression of magic. 2. The Information Theory and its science involved (Dianetics and Bioenergetics) to show how magical effectiveness is reached. 3. The Theory of Post-modernity to analyze the scenic characteristics of magical ritual. The theatre aesthetics of magic is important for producing emotional reactions toward healing by the magical action. 4. The Theory of Speech Act and Philosophy of Symbolic Forms to show how manages to operate the magic with power over the world and its creatures. 5. The Theory of Discourse to establish the structure of magical discourse. 6. The Theory of Symbols to establish the symbolic structure of magic.

Behind the Masks of God

This brought them into contact with the Gardnerian tradition of magical religion (or religious magic) and deeply influenced that tradition in return. In the West adherents believe in or practice various forms of magic. The Hermetic ...

Behind the Masks of God


The Mysteries of Magic

Thus the fabulous history of the Golden Fleece epitomises , while it veils , the Hermetic and magical doctrines of Orpheus , and if we refer only to the mysterious poetry of Greece , it is because the sanctuaries of Egypt and India to ...

The Mysteries of Magic

Selections from the writings of the French (largely theoretical) magus, Eliphas Levi, by a fellow occultist and scholar, A.E. Waite. (Includes an account of Levi?s rare venture into practical magic with a spirit evocation.).

Western Esotericism and the Science of Religion

of Giordano Bruno and the Hermetic Tradition : ' The great forward movements of the Renaissance all derive their ... Synesius and the Chaldaean Oracles in Marsilio Ficino's De Vita Libri Tres : Hermetic Magic or Neoplatonic Magic ?

Western Esotericism and the Science of Religion

This volume is based upon papers read during the innovative section "Western Esotericism and the Science of Religion" organized at the 17th International Congress of the International Association for the History of Religions (IAHR) in Mexico City, August 5-12, 1995. The section was created in order to fill a long-standing hiatus in the academic study of religions: whereas phenomena such as gnosticism and hermetism in antiquity, and even the occult sciences of that period, have long been recognized as subjects worthy of serious investigation, the history of similar and related phenomena in more recent periods has hardly received the same measure of scholarly attention and recognition. The present volume is devoted to the academic emancipation of these areas as constituting a legitimate domain of research, which may be referred to by the generic label "western esotericism". Preceded by an introductory essay on the birth of this new discipline in the study of religion, the volume provides a sample of current research in the field and devotes special attention to some central methodological questions.

The Princess and the Prophet

The Secret History of Magic, Race, and Moorish Muslims in America Jacob S. Dorman ... Ficino used hermetic texts to create a system of “ natural magic ” whereby magicians attempted to harness the astrological power of the stars by using ...

The Princess and the Prophet

The just-discovered story of how two enigmatic circus performers and the cultural ferment of the Gilded Age sparked the Black Muslim movement in America Delving into new archives and uncovering fascinating biographical narratives, secret rituals, and hidden identities, historian Jacob Dorman explains why thousands of Americans were enthralled by the Islamic Orient, and why some came to see Islam as a global antiracist movement uniquely suited to people of African descent in an era of European imperialism, Jim Crow segregation, and officially sanctioned racism. The Princess and the Prophet tells the story of the Black Broadway performer who, among the world of Arabian acrobats and equestrians, Muslim fakirs, and Wild West shows, discovered in Islam a greater measure of freedom and dignity, and a rebuttal to the racism and parochialism of white America. Overturning the received wisdom that the prophet was born on the East Coast, Dorman has discovered that Noble Drew Ali was born Walter Brister in Kentucky. With the help of his wife, a former lion tamer and “Hindoo” magician herself, Brister renamed himself Prophet Noble Drew Ali and founded the predecessor of the Nation of Islam, the Moorish Science Temple of America, in the 1920s. With an array of profitable businesses, the “Moors” built a nationwide following of thousands of dues-paying members, swung Chicago elections, and embedded themselves in Chicago’s dominant Republican political machine at the height of Prohibition racketeering, only to see their sect descend into infighting in 1929 that likely claimed the prophet’s life. This fascinating untold story reveals that cultures grow as much from imagination as inheritance, and that breaking down the artificial silos around various racial and religious cultures helps to understand not only America’s hidden past but also its polycultural present.

John Dee

The cabala – an integral part of Renaissance magical theory – was considered to be the oral part of God's ... Renaissance Hermetic magic was an enlightened and refined discipline and quite different from the dark and primitive black ...

John Dee

First published in 1987. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Tarot

The first architect of Renaissance magical theory was Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499), who is best known for having translated Plato's works. More important for our purposes, however, ... Moreover, this Hermetic magic was natural magic, ...

The Tarot

A guide to the origin and meaning of Tarot cards traces the Tarot's history, demonstrates how the Tarot works from a scientific and metaphysical viewpoint, and offers advice on reading the cards for divination, meditation, and inner growth