Hispanic Spaces Latino Places

In this book, sixteen geographers and two sociologists map the regional and cultural diversity of the Hispanic/Latino population of the United States.

Hispanic Spaces  Latino Places

Hispanics/Latinos are the largest ethnic minority in the United States—but they are far from being a homogenous group. Mexican Americans in the Southwest have roots that extend back four centuries, while Dominicans and Salvadorans are very recent immigrants. Cuban Americans in South Florida have very different occupational achievements, employment levels, and income from immigrant Guatemalans who work in the poultry industry in Virginia. In fact, the only characteristic shared by all Hispanics/Latinos in the United States is birth or ancestry in a Spanish-speaking country. In this book, sixteen geographers and two sociologists map the regional and cultural diversity of the Hispanic/Latino population of the United States. They report on Hispanic communities in all sections of the country, showing how factors such as people's country/culture of origin, length of time in the United States, and relations with non-Hispanic society have interacted to create a wide variety of Hispanic communities. Identifying larger trends, they also discuss the common characteristics of three types of Hispanic communities—those that have always been predominantly Hispanic, those that have become Anglo-dominated, and those in which Hispanics are just becoming a significant portion of the population.

Di logos Placemaking in Latino Communities

30J.Curtis, “Barriospace and place inSouthEast LosAngeles, California,” inD. Arreola (ed.), Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America, Austin: Universityof TexasPress, 2004, pp.

Di  logos  Placemaking in Latino Communities

Latinos are one of the largest and fastest growing social groups in the United States, and their increased presence is profoundly shaping the character of urban, suburban, and rural places. This is a response to these developments and is the first book written for readers seeking to learn about, engage and plan with Latino communities. It considers how placemaking in marginalized communities sheds light on, and can inform, community-building practices of professionals and place dwellers alike. Diálogos: Placemaking in Latino Communities will help readers better understand the conflicts and challenges inherent in placemaking, and to make effective and sustainable choices for practice in an increasingly multi-ethnic world. The essays explore three aspects of place: the appropriation and territorialization of the built environment, the claiming of rights through collective action, and a sense of belonging through civic participation. The authors illustrate their ideas through case studies and explain the implications of their work for placemaking practice. A consistent theme about planning and design practice in Latino communities emerges throughout the book: placemaking happens with or without professional planners and designers. All of the essays in Diálogos demonstrate the need to not only imagine, build, and make places with local communities, but also to re-imagine how we practice democracy inclusive of cross-cultural exchange, understanding, and respect. This will require educators, students, and working professionals to incorporate the knowledge and skills of cultural competency into their everyday practices.

Cultures of Globalization

Curtis, J. (2004) Barrio space and place in Southeast Los Angeles, California, in: D. Arreola (Ed.) Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America (Austin, TX: University of Texas Press), pp.

Cultures of Globalization

Much has been written about the economic and political implications of the contemporary process of globalization. Much less has been written about the specific cultural implications. Previously published as a special issue of Globalizations, this book seeks to add to our knowledge of the latter by bringing together researchers from different disciplines with the common goal of exploring the emerging cultural relations among groups and individuals in terms of coherence and hybridity, identity and allegiance, and cooperation and conflict. As the world’s peoples increasingly travel, work, trade, recreate, and otherwise communicate with each other, relative cultural isolation (and isolationism) is becoming less and less possible. What does this mean for cultural coherence, stability and identity across the planet? What have been the cultural implications of, and reactions to, this increasing global interdependence among peoples? From more global and theoretical perspectives to more empirical and case-specific approaches, the various authors attempt to come to terms with the ever evolving and complex cultural content of contemporary globalization.

Contemporary Ethnic Geographies in America

Leo Grebler, Joan W. Moore, and Ralph Guzman, The Mexican-American People: The Nation's Second Largest Minority (New York: Free Press, 1970); Daniel D. Arreola, ed., Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in ...

Contemporary Ethnic Geographies in America

Ethnic diversity has marked the United States from its inception, and it is impossible to separate ethnicity from an understanding of the United States as a country and “Americans” as a people. Since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, the United States has experienced watershed transformations in its social, cultural, and ethnic geographies. Considering the impact of these wide-ranging changes, this unique text examines the experiences of a range of ethnic groups in both historical and contemporary context. It begins by laying out a comprehensive conceptual framework that integrates immigration theory; globalization; transnational community formation; and urban, cultural, and economic geography. The contributors then present a rich set of case studies of the key Latin American, Asian American, and Middle Eastern communities comprising the vast majority of newer immigrants. Each case offers a brief historical overview of the group’s immigration experience and settlement patterns and discusses its contemporary socioeconomic dynamics. All these communities have transformed—and been transformed by—the places in which they have settled. Exploring these changing communities, places, and landscapes, this book offers a nuanced understanding of the evolution of America's contemporary ethnic geographies.

Negotiating Latinidades Understanding Identities within Space

Aparicio, Frances R. “U.S. Latino Expressive Cultures.” The Columbia History of Latinos in the United States Since 1960. ... Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America.

Negotiating Latinidades  Understanding Identities within Space

Preconceived ideas attached to space limit the ways in which the concept can be envisioned. This edited collection explores many different types of space, including exile, which prohibits one's ability to return home; transnationalism, which encourages movement between national borders typically due to dual citizenship; the borderlands, which implies legal and illegal crossings; and finally, the open road as metaphor for normative, heterosexual masculinity. At issue in all of these representations is the role of freedom to self-define and travel freely across barriers that exist to deter entry.

A Promising Problem

Charles Hirschman and Douglass S. Massey, “Places and Peoples: The New American Mosaic,” in New Faces in New Places, ... the Poultry Industry,” in Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America, ...

A Promising Problem

Chicana/o history has reached an intriguing juncture. While academic and intellectual studies are embracing new, highly nuanced perspectives on race, class, gender, education, identity, and community, the field itself continues to be viewed as a battleground, subject to attacks from outside academia by those who claim that the discipline promotes racial hatred and anti-Americanism. Against a backdrop of deportations and voter suppression targeting Latinos, A Promising Problem presents the optimistic voices of scholars who call for sophisticated solutions while embracing transnationalism and the reality of multiple, overlapping identities. Showcasing a variety of new directions, this anthology spans topics such as growth and reassessment in Chicana/o history manifested in a disruption of nationalism and geographic essentialism, the impact of legal history, interracial relations and the experiences of Latino subpopulations in the US South, race and the politics of religious history, transborder feminism in the early twentieth century, and aspirations for a field that increasingly demonstrates the relational dynamics of cultural production. As they reflect on the state of their field, the contributors offer significant insights into sociology, psychology, anthropology, political science, education, and literature, while tracing the history of activism throughout the last century and debating the very concepts of "Chicano" and "Chicano history." Although the political landscape is fraught with closed-off rhetoric, A Promising Problem encourages diversity of thought and opens the possibilities of historical imagination.

Latinos in the New South

Hispanic Spaces , Latino Places , Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America , University of Texas Press , Austin , TX , pp . 125-41 . Davis , Mike ( 2001 ) , Magical Urbanism , Latinos Reinvent the U.S. City , Verso , NY ...

Latinos in the New South

Latinos have emerged as one of the fastest-growing ethnic populations in the American South. This book presents a multidisciplinary examination of the impacts and responses across the Southeastern United States to Latino immigration. Drawing on theoretical perspectives and empirical research, each chapter is centred on the nexus between the immigrants' experiences and the construction of transformed social, economic, political and cultural spaces.

Nuevo South

Latinas/os, Asians, and the Remaking of Place Perla M. Guerrero ... Migration to the American South: The Case of the Poultry Industry,” in Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America, ed.

Nuevo South

Latinas/os and Asians are rewriting the meaning and history of race in the American South by complicating the black/white binary that has frequently defined the region since before the Civil War. Arriving in southern communities as migrants or refugees, Latinas/os and Asians have experienced both begrudging acceptance and prejudice as their presence confronts and troubles local understandings of race and difference—understandings that have deep roots in each community's particular racial history, as well as in national fears and anxieties about race. Nuevo South offers the first comparative study showing how Latinas/os and Asians are transforming race and place in the contemporary South. Integrating political, economic, and social analysis, Perla M. Guerrero examines the reception of Vietnamese, Cubans, and Mexicans in northwestern Arkansas communities that were almost completely white until the mid-1970s. She shows how reactions to these refugees and immigrants ranged from reluctant acceptance of Vietnamese as former US allies to rejection of Cubans as communists, criminals, and homosexuals and Mexicans as "illegal aliens" who were perceived as invaders when they began to establish roots and became more visible in public spaces. Guerrero's research clarifies how social relations are constituted in the labor sphere, particularly the poultry industry, and reveals the legacies of regional history, especially anti-Black violence and racial cleansing. Nuevo South thus helps us to better understand what constitutes the so-called Nuevo South and how historical legacies shape the reception of new people in the region.

Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U S South

Greig Guthey, “Mexican Places in Southern Spaces: Globalization, Work, and Daily Life in and around the North Georgia Poultry Industry,” in Murphy, Blanchard, and Hill, Latino Workers in the Contemporary South, 57-67; David Griflith, ...

Latino Immigrants and the Transformation of the U S  South

The Latino population in the South has more than doubled over the past decade. The mass migration of Latin Americans to the U.S. South has led to profound changes in the social, economic, and cultural life of the region and inaugurated a new era in southern history. This multidisciplinary collection of essays, written by U.S. and Mexican scholars, explores these transformations in rural, urban, and suburban areas of the South. Using a range of different methodologies and approaches, the contributors present in-depth analyses of how immigration from Mexico and Central and South America is changing the South and how immigrants are adapting to the southern context. Among the book’s central themes are the social and economic impact of immigration, the resulting shifts in regional culture, new racial dynamics, immigrant incorporation and place-making, and diverse southern responses to Latino newcomers. Various chapters explore ethnic and racial tensions among poultry workers in rural Mississippi and forestry workers in Alabama; the “Mexicanization” of the urban landscape in Dalton, Georgia; the costs and benefits of Latino labor in North Carolina; the challenges of living in transnational families; immigrant religious practice and community building in metropolitan Atlanta; and the creation of Latino spaces in rural and urban South Carolina and Georgia.

Latino Heartland

“Soccer and Latino Cultural Space: Metropolitan Washington Futbol Leagues.” In Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporize America, ed. David Arreola, 167–86. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2004.

Latino Heartland

National immigration debates have thrust both opponents of immigration and immigrant rights supporters into the news. But what happens once the rallies end and the banners come down? What is daily life like for Latinos who have been presented nationally as “terrorists, drug smugglers, alien gangs, and violent criminals”? Latino Heartland offers an ethnography of the Latino and non-Latino residents of a small Indiana town, showing how national debate pitted neighbor against neighbor—and the strategies some used to combat such animosity. It conveys the lived impact of divisive political rhetoric on immigration and how race, gender, class, and ethnicity inform community belonging in the twenty-first century. Latino Heartland illuminates how community membership was determined yet simultaneously re-made by those struggling to widen the scope of who was imagined as a legitimate resident citizen of this Midwestern space. The volume draws on interviews with Latinos—both new immigrants and long-standing U.S. citizens—and whites, as well as African Americans, to provide a sense of the racial dynamics in play as immigrants asserted their right to belong to the community. Latino Hoosiers asserted a right to redefine what belonging meant within their homes, at their spaces of worship, and in the public eye. Through daily acts of ethnic belonging, Spanish-speaking residents navigated their own sense of community that did not require that they abandon their difference just to be accepted. In Latino Heartland, Sujey Vega addresses the politics of immigration, showing us how increasingly diverse towns can work toward embracing their complexity.

Latino Food Culture

Ramón Grosfoguel, “Latino Caribbean Diasporas in New York,” in Mambo Montage, ed. Laó-Montes and Dávila, p. 98. 29. Inés M. Miyares, “Changing Latinization of New York City,” in Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural ...

Latino Food Culture

Latino cuisine has always been a part of American foodways, but the recent growth of a diverse Latino population in the form of documented and undocumented immigrants, refugees, and exiles has given rise to a pan-Latino food phenomenon. These various food cultures in the United States are expertly overviewed here together in depth for the first time. Many Mexican American, Cuban American, Puerto Ricans, Dominican American, and Central and South American communities in the United States are considered transnational because they actively participate in the economy, politics, and culture of both the United States and their countries of origin. The pan-Latino food culture that is emerging in the United States is also a transnational phenomenon that constantly nurtures and is nurtured by national and regional cuisines. They all combine in kaleidoscopic ways their shared gastronomic wealth of Spanish and Amerindian cuisines with different African, European and Asian culinary traditions. This book discusses the ongoing development of Latino food culture, giving special attention to how Latinos are adapting and transforming Latin American and international elements to create one of the most vibrant cuisines today. This is essential reading for crucial cultural insight into Latinos from all backgrounds. Readers will learn about the diverse elements of an evolving pan-Latino food culture-the history of the various groups and their foodstuffs, cooking, meals and eating habits, special occasions, and diet and health. Representative recipes and photos are interspersed in the essays. A chronology, glossary, resource guide, and bibliography make this a one-stop resource for every library.

The Oxford Handbook of Latino Studies

See also Juan Javier Pescador, “Los Heroes del Domingo: Soccer, Borders, and Social Spaces in Great Lakes Mexican ... “Soccer and Latino Cultural Space: Metropolitan Washington Futbol Leagues,” in Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: ...

The Oxford Handbook of Latino Studies

At the beginning of the third decade of the 21st century, the Latino minority, the biggest and fastest growing in the United States, is at a crossroads. Is assimilation taking place in comparable ways to previous immigrant groups? Are the links to the countries of origin being redefined in the age of contested globalism? How are Latinos changing America and how is America changing Latinos? The Oxford Handbook of Latino Studies reflects on these questions, offering a sweeping exploration of Latinas and Latinos' complex experiences in the United States. Edited by leading expert Ilan Stavans, the handbook traces the emergence of Latino studies as a vibrant and interdisciplinary field of research starting in the 1980s, assessing the current state of the discipline while suggesting new paths for exploration. With its twenty-three essays and a conversation by established and emerging scholars, the book discusses various aspects of Latino life and history, from literature, popular culture, and music, to religion, philosophy, and language identity. The articles present new interpretations of important themes such as the Chicano Movement, gender and race relations, the changes in demographics, the tension between rural and urban communities, immigration and the US/Mexico border, the legacy of colonialism, and the controversy surrounding Spanglish. The first handbook on Latino Studies, this collection offers a multifaceted and thought-provoking look at how Latinos are redefining the American identity.

The Routledge Handbook of Spanish as a Heritage Language

One is their potential role in the teaching about Spanish and Latinos in the U.S. LL research findings could be ... In D. D. Arreola (Ed.), Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America (pp.

The Routledge Handbook of Spanish as a Heritage Language

The Routledge Handbook of Spanish as a Heritage Language brings together contributions from leading linguists, educators and Latino Studies scholars involved in teaching and working with Spanish heritage language speakers. This state-of-the-art overview covers a range of topics within five broad areas: Spanish in U.S. public life, Spanish heritage language use and systems, educational contexts, Latino studies perspectives and Spanish outside the U.S. The Routledge Handbook of Spanish as a Heritage Language addresses for the first time the linguistic, educational and social aspects of heritage Spanish speakers in one volume making it an indispensable reference for anyone working with Spanish as a heritage language.

Latin America Second Edition

Latin American migrations to the U.S. heartland: Changing social landscapes in middle America. Urbana– Champaign: University of Illinois Press. Arreola, D. D. (Ed.). (2004). Hispanic spaces, Latino places: Community and cultural ...

Latin America  Second Edition

Popular among students for its engaging, accessible style, this text provides an authoritative overview of Latin America's human geography as well as its regional complexity. Extensively revised to reflect the region's ongoing evolution in the first decades of the 21st century, the second edition's alternating thematic and regional chapters trace Latin America's historical development while revealing the diversity of its people and places. Coverage encompasses cultural history, environment and physical geography, urban development, agriculture and land use, social and economic processes, and the contemporary patterns of the Latin American diaspora. Pedagogical features include vivid topical vignettes, end-of-chapter recommended readings and other resources, and 217 photographs, maps, and figures. New to This Edition *Discussions of climate change and its impacts, the demise of the Monroe doctrine, neoliberal agriculture, the growing influence of Chinese investment, and other new topics. *13 new vignettes highlighting current issues such as the thaw in United States-Cuba relations, drug violence in Mexico, aerial gondolas in the Andes, and the first Latin pope. *Annotated website and film recommendations for most chapters. *The latest development trends, population and economic data, and current events of local and global significance. *26 new photographs, maps, and figures.

The Routledge Handbook to the History and Society of the Americas

Conclusion One of the primary features of urbanization in the Americas is the sharp dichotomy between Latin/Mediterranean cities and North American or Anglo-American cities. In the former, the town is the main settlement space, ...

The Routledge Handbook to the History and Society of the Americas

The colonial heritage and its renewed aftermaths – expressed in the inter-American experiences of slavery, indigeneity, dependence, and freedom movements, to mention only a few aspects – form a common ground of experience in the Western Hemisphere. The flow of peoples, goods, knowledge and finances have promoted interdependence and integration that cut across borders and link the countries of North and South America together. The nature of this transversally related and multiply interconnected region can only be captured through a transnational, multidisciplinary, and comprehensive approach. The Routledge Handbook to the History and Society of the Americas explores the history and society of the Americas, placing particular emphasis on collective and intertwined experiences. Forty-four chapters cover a range of concepts and dynamics in the Americas from the colonial period until the present century: The shared histories and dynamics of Inter-American relationships are considered through pre-Hispanic empires, colonization, European hegemony, migration, multiculturalism, and political and economic interdependences. Key concepts are selected and explored from different geopolitical, disciplinary, and epistemological perspectives. Highlighting the contested character of key concepts that are usually defined in strict disciplinary terms, the Handbook provides the basis for a better and deeper understanding of inter-American entanglements. This multidisciplinary approach will be of interest to a broad array of academic scholars and students in history, sociology, political science cultural, postcolonial, gender, literary, and globalization studies.

Latinos and Latinas at Risk Issues in Education Health Community and Justice 2 volumes

Arreola, Daniel D. Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America. 1st ed. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2004. Bacon, David. „The Fruits of NAFTA.‰ ZNet Recent Items.

Latinos and Latinas at Risk  Issues in Education  Health  Community  and Justice  2 volumes

This two-volume collection of essays addresses the Latino/a experience in present-day America, covering six major areas of importance: education, health, family, children, teens, and violence. • Provides information from authoritative sources and data based on recent research • Includes ancillary tables, figures, and statistics for visual support • Features thoughtful questions and reflections on the chapters that support readers' further exploration of the topics • Shares some first-hand accounts and autobiographies along with selected interviews

Placing Latin America

ethnoburb: Originally coined by Li (2009), the term refers to suburban ethnic minority residential areas that, in contrast to other ... Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America.

Placing Latin America

This comprehensive study offers a thematic approach to Latin America, focusing on the dynamic connections between people, places, and environments rather than on pre-defined notions about the region. The book s well-rounded and accessible analysis includes discussions of borders and migration; transnationalism and globalization; urbanization and the material, environmental and social landscapes of cities; and the connections between economic development and political change. The authors also explore social and cultural themes such as the illegal drug trade, tourism, children, and cinema. Offering a nuanced and clear perspective, this book will be a valuable resource for all those interested in the politics, economy, and society of a rapidly globalizing continent. Contributions by: Fernando J. Bosco, J. Christopher Brown, James Craine, Altha J. Cravey, Giorgio Hadi Curti, James Hayes, Edward L. Jackiewicz, Thomas Klak, Mirek Lipinski, Regan M. Maas, Araceli Masterson-Algar, Kent Mathewson, Sarah A. Moore, Linda Quiquivix, Zia Salim, Kate Swanson, and Benjamin Timms."

New Faces in New Places

“'Making Carpet by the Mile': The Emergence of a Mexican Immigrant Community in an Industrial Region of the U.S. ... In Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: A Geography of Regional and Cultural Diversity, edited by Daniel D. Arreola.

New Faces in New Places

Beginning in the 1990s, immigrants to the United States increasingly bypassed traditional gateway cites such as Los Angeles and New York to settle in smaller towns and cities throughout the nation. With immigrant communities popping up in so many new places, questions about ethnic diversity and immigrant assimilation confront more and more Americans. New Faces in New Places, edited by distinguished sociologist Douglas Massey, explores today's geography of immigration and examines the ways in which native-born Americans are dealing with their new neighbors. Using the latest census data and other population surveys, New Faces in New Places examines the causes and consequences of the shift toward new immigrant destinations. Contributors Mark Leach and Frank Bean examine the growing demand for low-wage labor and lower housing costs that have attracted many immigrants to move beyond the larger cities. Katharine Donato, Charles Tolbert, Alfred Nucci, and Yukio Kawano report that the majority of Mexican immigrants are no longer single male workers but entire families, who are settling in small towns and creating a surge among some rural populations long in decline. Katherine Fennelly shows how opinions about the growing immigrant population in a small Minnesota town are divided along socioeconomic lines among the local inhabitants. The town's leadership and professional elites focus on immigrant contributions to the economic development and the diversification of the community, while working class residents fear new immigrants will bring crime and an increased tax burden to their communities. Helen Marrow reports that many African Americans in the rural south object to Hispanic immigrants benefiting from affirmative action even though they have just arrived in the United States and never experienced historical discrimination. As Douglas Massey argues in his conclusion, many of the towns profiled in this volume are not equipped with the social and economic institutions to help assimilate new immigrants that are available in the traditional immigrant gateways of New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago. And the continual replenishment of the flow of immigrants may adversely affect the nation's perception of how today's newcomers are assimilating relative to previous waves of immigrants. New Faces in New Places illustrates the many ways that communities across the nation are reacting to the arrival of immigrant newcomers, and suggests that patterns and processes of assimilation in the twenty-first century may be quite different from those of the past. Enriched by perspectives from sociology, anthropology, and geography New Faces in New Places is essential reading for scholars of immigration and all those interested in learning the facts about new faces in new places in America.

Race Ethnicity and Place in a Changing America Third Edition

Tejano South Texas: A Mexican American Cultural Province. Austin: University of Texas Press. Arreola, D. D. (ed.). 2004. Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America.

Race  Ethnicity  and Place in a Changing America  Third Edition

Uses both historical and contemporary case studies to examine how race and ethnicity affect the places we live, work, and visit. This book examines major Hispanic, African, and Asian diasporas in the continental United States and Puerto Rico from the nineteenth century to the present, with particular attention on the diverse ways in which these immigrant groups have shaped and reshaped American places and landscapes. Through both historical and contemporary case studies, the contributors examine how race and ethnicity affect the places we live, work, and visit, illustrating along the way the behaviors and concepts that comprise the modern ethnic and racial geography of immigrant and minority groups. While primarily addressed to students and scholars in the fields of racial and ethnic geography, these case studies will be accessible to anyone interested in race-place connections, race-ethnicity boundaries, the development of racialization, and the complexity of human settlement patterns and landscapes that make up the United States and Puerto Rico. Taken together, they show how individuals and culture groups, through their ideologies, social organization, and social institutions, reflect both local and regional processes of place-making and place-remaking that occur within and beyond the continental United States.

Latinos at the Golden Gate

“Barrio under Siege: Latino Sense of Place in San Francisco, California.” In Hispanic Spaces, Latino Places: Community and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary America, edited by Daniel D. Arreola. Austin: University of Texas Press, ...

Latinos at the Golden Gate

Born in an explosive boom and built through distinct economic networks, San Francisco has a cosmopolitan character that often masks the challenges migrants faced to create community in the city by the bay. Latin American migrants have been part of the city's story since its beginning. Charting the development of a hybrid Latino identity forged through struggle--latinidad--from the Gold Rush through the civil rights era, Tomas F. Summers Sandoval Jr. chronicles the rise of San Francisco's diverse community of Latin American migrants. This latinidad, Summers Sandoval shows, was formed and made visible on college campuses and in churches, neighborhoods, movements for change, youth groups, protests, the Spanish-language press, and business districts. Using diverse archival sources, Summers Sandoval gives readers a panoramic perspective on the transformation of a multinational, multigenerational population into a visible, cohesive, and diverse community that today is a major force for social and political activism and cultural production in California and beyond.