A History Of Cambodia

Extends the history of the Southeast Asian country from 1953 (where the first edition ended) to the peace negotiations of 1990.

A History Of Cambodia

Extends the history of the Southeast Asian country from 1953 (where the first edition ended) to the peace negotiations of 1990. Includes the career of Prince Norodim Sihanouk, the regime of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, and the relative peace after the 1979 invasion by Vietnam. Draws heavily on primary sources. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

A History Of Cambodia

Cambodian history - Cambodia after Angkor - French Protectorate - Cambodia's response to France - Gaining independence - Independence to Civil war - Revolution in Cambodia - Cambodia since 1979.

A History Of Cambodia

Cambodian history - Cambodia after Angkor - French Protectorate - Cambodia's response to France - Gaining independence - Independence to Civil war - Revolution in Cambodia - Cambodia since 1979.

The Tragedy of Cambodian History

This book by David P. Chandler is the first to give a full account of this tumultuous period. Drawing on his experience as a foreign service officer in Phnom Penh, on interviews, and on archival material.

The Tragedy of Cambodian History

The political history of Cambodia between 1945 and 1979, which culminated in the devastating revolutionary excesses of the Pol Pot regime, is one of unrest and misery. This book by David P. Chandler is the first to give a full account of this tumultuous period. Drawing on his experience as a foreign service officer in Phnom Penh, on interviews, and on archival material. Chandler considers why the revolution happened and how it was related to Cambodia's earlier history and to other events in Southeast Asia. He describes Cambodia's brief spell of independence from Japan after the end of World War II; the long and complicated rule of Norodom Sihanouk, during which the Vietnam War gradually spilled over Cambodia's borders; the bloodless coup of 1970 that deposed Sihanouk and put in power the feeble, pro-American government of Lon Nol; and the revolution in 1975 that ushered in the radical changes and horrors of Pol Pot's Communist regime. Chandler discusses how Pol Pot and his colleagues evacuated Cambodia's cities and towns, transformed its seven million people into an unpaid labor force, tortured and killed party members when agricultural quotas were unmet, and were finally overthrown in the course of a Vietnamese military invasion in 1979. His book is a penetrating and poignant analysis of this fierce revolutionary period and the events of the previous quarter-century that made it possible.

Cambodian History

Two captivating manuscripts in one book: History of Cambodia The Khmer Empire

Cambodian History

Two captivating manuscripts in one book: History of Cambodia The Khmer Empire

History of Cambodia

Cambodia, or, as it was once known, Kampuchea, is a beautiful country, replete with an incredibly wondrous system of canals. Its history has been marked by the Khmer Rouge and Pol Pot.

History of Cambodia

Cambodia, or, as it was once known, Kampuchea, is a beautiful country, replete with an incredibly wondrous system of canals. Its history has been marked by the Khmer Rouge and Pol Pot.

Cambodia s Curse

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Joel Brinkley learned that almost a half of Cambodians who lived through the Khmer Rouge era suffered from P.T.S.D. -- and had passed their trauma to the next generation.

Cambodia s Curse

A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist describes how Cambodia emerged from the harrowing years when a quarter of its population perished under the Khmer Rouge. A generation after genocide, Cambodia seemed on the surface to have overcome its history -- the streets of Phnom Penh were paved; skyscrapers dotted the skyline. But under this façe lies a country still haunted by its years of terror. Although the international community tried to rebuild Cambodia and introduce democracy in the 1990s, in the country remained in the grip of a venal government. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Joel Brinkley learned that almost a half of Cambodians who lived through the Khmer Rouge era suffered from P.T.S.D. -- and had passed their trauma to the next generation. His extensive close-up reporting in Cambodia's Curse illuminates the country, its people, and the deep historical roots of its modern-day behavior.

Die Botschaft von Kambodscha The Embassy of Cambodia

Nach ihrem großen Roman »London NW« legt Zadie Smith mit dieser brillanten Erzählung nach – ein literarischer Diamant!

Die Botschaft von Kambodscha   The Embassy of Cambodia

Nach ihrem großen Roman »London NW« legt Zadie Smith mit dieser brillanten Erzählung nach – ein literarischer Diamant! Jeden Montag beobachtet Fatou einen Federball, der hinter den hohen Mauern der Botschaft von Kambodscha hin und her fliegt – ein scheinbar unendlich andauerndes Match. Fatou ist auf dem Weg zum Schwimmbad, wo sie jeden Montagmorgen ihre Bahnen zieht. Neben den sonntäglichen Treffen mit Andrew Okonkwo, einem bibelfesten Studenten aus Nigeria, ist dies die einzige Stunde in der Woche, die ganz ihr gehört. Den Rest der Woche arbeitet Fatou als Haushälterin bei den Derawals, kauft ein, kocht, putzt und hütet die Kinder. Nein, eine Sklavin ist Fatou nicht. Hin und wieder wird sie geschlagen, und bezahlt wird sie für ihre Arbeit nicht, das Haus aber verlässt sie regelmäßig und ohne um Erlaubnis fragen zu müssen. Fatou ist stoisch, sie geht durchs Leben, wie sie ihre Bahnen im Schwimmbad zieht, und es scheint fast, als würde alles immer so weitergehen – bis Fatou einem der Kinder zufällig das Leben rettet und damit das eingespielte Gleichgewicht der Familie Derawal durcheinanderbringt.Mit »Die Botschaft von Kambodscha« stellt die großartige Zadie Smith einmal mehr unter Beweis, dass es manchmal nur weniger Worte bedarf, um eine große Geschichte zu erzählen. »Dieses prägnante Glanzstück zeigt einmal mehr, warum Zadie Smith im Alter von 38 Jahren zu den kenntnisreichsten, witzigsten, differenziertesten Beobachtern der post-kolonialen Landschaft zählt.« The Star

A Short History of Cambodia

New in the Short History of Asia series, edited by Milton Osborne, this is a concise and readable history of Cambodia, from its rich and powerful past, through the era of French protection, the Vietnamese conflict, the Pol Pot regime and to ...

A Short History of Cambodia

A concise history of Cambodia, from its rich and powerful past, through the era of French protection, the Vietnamese conflict, the Pol Pot regime and to its present day incarnation as a constitutional monarchy and popular tourist destination.

The History of Cambodia

The novelist Marguerite Duras later wrote that her mother, a settler in Cambodia at the time, was disgusted by the ... Two of the early Résidents, Jean Moura and Étienne Aymonier, both wrote serious books about Cambodian history— Le ...

The History of Cambodia

This book includes a narrative history that provides a chronological examination of the political, cultural, philosophical, social, and religious continuities in Cambodia's long rich history. It overviews the history of Cambodia, from the fall of Angkor and the French Protectorate period (1432-1863) to the present. More than half of the book is dedicated to the period from 1970 through the present, with chapters on the Khmer Republic, Democratic Kampuchea, the second civil war, the road to democracy, and Cambodia under Hun Sen. An introductory chapter overviews the country's geography, political institutions, economy, and culture. The book includes black & white historical and contemporary photographs, a chronology, and profiles of key figures.

Angkor and the Khmer Empire

The Khmer Empire was the most powerful in Southeast Asia for 600 years.

Angkor and the Khmer Empire

The Khmer Empire was the most powerful in Southeast Asia for 600 years. Ruled by kings called "god-kings," it dominated much of the Mekong and Chao Phraya River basins between 802 and 1431 and built some of the most impressive temples in the world. Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam are all former Khmer territories. For hundreds of years before its collapse in 1431, the Khmer Empire dominated Southeast Asia. With its capital at Angkor, it was the region's largest and most powerful Empire, incorporating parts of Vietnam, Thailand, Burma, and Malaysia into its territory. Historians disagree on the reason for its fall. One theory is that it was a result of an internal power struggle. Another theory is that the Empire's citizens were unhappy with their ruler and demanded another leader, which led to the collapse of Angkor. Another popular theory is that because no central government was in charge, local leaders started fighting with each other over land rights. Some historians also think that foreign invaders might have played a role in ending Khmer influence over Southeast Asia and causing their downfall. They say this because after Angkor was abandoned by its people and left unattended for centuries, several different groups took control over it—including Europeans who colonized Vietnam and Thailand during this period (18th century). To them, this suggests there must've been some conflict between these new rulers of the Khmer Empire." Historians think Angkor had a population between 750,000 and 1 million by the 12th century, making it one of the largest cities ever built. Angkor Wat is also the largest religious building in the world, with a footprint of 400 acres or 162 hectares. It covers an area greater than Manhattan Island in New York City. Angkor Wat was built as a Hindu temple, but it also reflects influences from Buddhism and Jainism. The temple was constructed by King Suryavarman II during his reign from 1113 to 1145. It took about 30 years to build, but today only 15 percent of the original structure remains standing. The architecture at Angkor is unmatched for its scale, complexity, and harmony. Compared to other temple complexes in Asia, the temples of Angkor are the most significant religious buildings in the world.

An Economic History of Cambodia in the Twentieth Century

She also asks whether economic factors in some way instigated war and revolution. In exploring these issues, the book tracks the erratic path taken by Cambodia's political elite and earlier colonial rulers to develop a national economy.

An Economic History of Cambodia in the Twentieth Century

The course of economic change in twentieth century Cambodia was marked by a series of deliberate ""conscious human efforts"" that were typically extreme and ideologically driven. While colonization, protracted war and violent revolution are commonly blamed for Cambodia's failure to modernize its economy in the twentieth century, Margaret Slocomb's Economic History of Cambodia in the Twentieth Century questions whether these circumstances changed the underlying structures and relations of production. She also asks whether economic factors in some way instigated war and revolution. In exploring these issues, the book tracks the erratic path taken by Cambodia's political elite and earlier colonial rulers to develop a national economy. The book closes around 2005, by which time Cambodia had be reintegrated into both the regional and into the global economy as a fully-fledged member of the World Trade Organization. To document Cambodia's path towards a modern economy, the author draws on resources from the State Archives of Cambodia not previously referenced in scholarly texts. The book provides information that is academically important but is also relevant to investors, aid workers and development specialists seeking to understand the shift from a traditional to a modern market economy.

History Buddhism and New Religious Movements in Cambodia

This volume showcases some of the most current and exciting research being done on Cambodian religious ideas and practices by a new generation of scholars from a variety of disciplines.

History  Buddhism  and New Religious Movements in Cambodia

This volume showcases some of the most current and exciting research being done on Cambodian religious ideas and practices by a new generation of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The different contributors examine in some manner the relationship between religion and the ideas and institutions that have given shape to Cambodia as a social and political body, or nation. Although they do not share the same approach to the idea of "nation," all are concerned with the processes of religion that give meaning to social interaction, which in some way includes "Cambodian" identity. Chapters touch on such far-reaching theoretical issues as the relation to religion of Southeast Asian polity; the nature of colonial religious transformation; "syncretism" in Southeast Asian Buddhism; the relation of religious icon to national identity, religion, and gender; transnationalism and social movements; and identity among diaspora communities. While much has been published on Cambodia's recent civil war and the Pol Pot period and its aftermath, few English language works are available on Cambodian religion. This book takes a major step in filling that gap, offering a broad overview of the subject that is relevant not only for the field of Cambodian studies, but also for students and scholars of Southeast Asian history, Buddhism, comparative religion, and anthropology. Contributors: Didier Bertrand, Penny Edwards, Elizabeth Guthrie, Hang Chan Sophea, Anne Hansen, John Marston, Kathryn Poethig, Ashley Thompson, Teri Shaffer Yamada.

Cambodia Under the Tricolour

Illustrating the social and political history of Cambodia during the heyday of the French mission civilisatrice in the Sisowath years, this book examines the contradictory nature of the ancient kingdom.

Cambodia Under the Tricolour

Illustrating the social and political history of Cambodia during the heyday of the French mission civilisatrice in the Sisowath years, this book examines the contradictory nature of the ancient kingdom.

At the Edge of the Forest

Inspired by David Chandler's groundbreaking work on Cambodian attempts to find order in the aftermath of turmoil, these essays explore Cambodian history using a rich variety of sources that cast light on Khmer perceptions of violence, ...

At the Edge of the Forest

Inspired by David Chandler's groundbreaking work on Cambodian attempts to find order in the aftermath of turmoil, these essays explore Cambodian history using a rich variety of sources that cast light on Khmer perceptions of violence, wildness, and order, examining the "forest" and cultured space, and the fraught "edge" where they meet.

A History of Cambodia

Unlike the other countries of mainland Southeast Asia, Cambodia has no mountain ranges running north to south that ... Cambodia's vulnerability to attack, especially after the decline of Angkor, is a recurrent feature of its history and ...

A History of Cambodia

In this clear and concise volume, author David Chandler provides a timely overview of Cambodia, a small but increasingly visible Southeast Asian nation. Praised by the Journal of Asian Studies as an ''original contribution, superior to any other existing work'', this acclaimed text has now been completely revised and updated to include material examining the early history of Cambodia, whose famous Angkorean ruins now attract more than one million tourists each year, the death of Pol Pot, and the revolution and final collapse of the Khmer Rouge. The fourth edition reflects recent research by major scholars as well as Chandler's long immersion in the subject and contains an entirely new section on the challenges facing Cambodia today, including an analysis of the current state of politics and sociology and the increasing pressures of globalization. This comprehensive overview of Cambodia will illuminate, for undergraduate students as well as general readers, the history and contemporary politics of a country long misunderstood.

Cambodia 1975 1982

Traces the history of Cambodia from the formation of the Pol Pot regime to the conquering of the country by Vietnam

Cambodia  1975 1982

Traces the history of Cambodia from the formation of the Pol Pot regime to the conquering of the country by Vietnam

The Khmer Kings and the History of Cambodia

This book also discusses the origin of the Khmers and how Chenla, the state under the vassalage of Funan, came to conquer its master state, but ultimately the kingdom had to split into the Land and Water Chenla.

The Khmer Kings and the History of Cambodia

The history of Cambodia is essentially the history of the Khmer kings. Power can be very seductive and addictive; and for this reason, kings or people with power would not voluntarily relinquish what they had and they would use any means necessary to maintain their control for absolute power. Sometimes it was easier for the king to rule his country than his family. This was certainly true for Cambodia when the kings begat many children from their multiple wives and concubines, creating many possible successors in competition for his throne. These shared bloodlines, across multiple generations, resulting in complicated and tumultuous family relationships wherein the family members would conspire against one another for power or the right to rule. This book also discusses the origin of the Khmers and how Chenla, the state under the vassalage of Funan, came to conquer its master state, but ultimately the kingdom had to split into the Land and Water Chenla. The breakup of Chenla brought chaos and civil wars into the region. Srivijaya (Java) invaded Water Chenla and subjugated the country to a vassal state before Jayavarman II declared Kambuja's independence from Java. A new emerging period sprung up and Angkor, also known as the Kambuja Period, replaced Chenla as the dominant state in the region. The ascendancy of Angkor reached its zenith under the reigns of Suryavarman II, the builder of Angkor Wat, and Jayavarman VII, the builder of Bayon. The emergence of Ayutthaya brought economic and military challenges to Angkor, which resulted in the fall of Angkor. The rivalry between Ayutthaya and Angkor pushed the Khmer kings to relocate their capitals farther east which started a new period, known as the Longvek period. Throughout the above periods, the Chief Brahman priests who held hereditary functions since the time of Jayavarman II were always involved in the affairs of the state and were close advisors to the kings. Their roles in shaping up the policies and affairs of the country were second only to those of the kings.

Lost Goddesses

In prehistoric times, Southeast Asian women enjoyed high status. When, how and why did that change? This book explores the history of gender relations through economics, politics, art and literature.

Lost Goddesses

In prehistoric times, Southeast Asian women enjoyed high status. When, how and why did that change? This book explores the history of gender relations through economics, politics, art and literature. This title is a narrative and visual tour de force, of interest to scholars and the general public.

Cambodian Buddhism

This impressive new work by Ian Harris thus fills a major gap and offers English-language scholars a booklength, up-to-date treatment of the religious aspects of Cambodian culture.

Cambodian Buddhism

The study of Cambodian religion has long been hampered by a lack of easily accessible scholarship. This impressive new work by Ian Harris thus fills a major gap and offers English-language scholars a booklength, up-to-date treatment of the religious aspects of Cambodian culture. Beginning with a coherent history of the presence of religion in the country from its inception to the present day, the book goes on to furnish insights into the distinctive nature of Cambodia's important yet overlooked manifestation of Theravada Buddhist tradition and to show how it reestablished itself following almost total annihilation during the Pol Pot period. Historical sections cover the dominant role of tantric Mahayana concepts and rituals under the last great king of Angkor, Jayavarman VII (1181–c. 1220); the rise of Theravada traditions after the collapse of the Angkorian civilization; the impact of foreign influences on the development of the nineteenth-century monastic order; and politicized Buddhism and the Buddhist contribution to an emerging sense of Khmer nationhood. The Buddhism practiced in Cambodia has much in common with parallel traditions in Thailand and Sri Lanka, yet there are also significant differences. The book concentrates on these and illustrates how a distinctly Cambodian Theravada developed by accommodating itself to premodern Khmer modes of thought. Following the overthrow of Prince Sihanouk in 1970, Cambodia slid rapidly into disorder and violence. Later chapters chart the elimination of institutional Buddhism under the Khmer Rouge and its gradual reemergence after Pol Pot, the restoration of the monastic order's prerevolutionary institutional forms, and the emergence of contemporary Buddhist groupings.

Historical Dictionary of Cambodia

Profiles the changes in government over Cambodia's history, detailing the driving forces that transformed the monarchy of the pre-colonial period to the current near-democracy.

Historical Dictionary of Cambodia

Profiles the changes in government over Cambodia's history, detailing the driving forces that transformed the monarchy of the pre-colonial period to the current near-democracy.