Brake Up Or A Roving Commission

By Horatio Alger , Jr. 32 - The Young Acrobat By Horatio Alger , Jr. 33 - Bound to Rise By Horatio Alger , Jr. 34 -Hector's Inheritance „ By Horatio Alger , Jr. 35 - Do and Dare .By Horatio Alger , Jr. 36 - The Tin Box By Horatio Alger ...

Brake Up  Or A Roving Commission


The American Myth of Success

Horatio Alger , Jr. , Fame and Fortune ( Boston : A. K. Loring , 1868 ) , pp . vii - viii . 15. Horatio Alger , Jr. , Phil , the Fiddler in Struggling Upward and Other Works , ed . Russel Crouse ( New York : Crown Publishers , 1945 ) ...

The American Myth of Success

"Tradition has it that every American child receives, as part of his birthright, the freedom to mold his own life. . . . However inaccurate as a description of American society, the success myth reflects what millions believe that society is or ought to be. The degree to which opportunity has or has not been available in our society is a subject for empirical investigation. It rests within the realm of verifiable fact. The belief that opportunity exists for all is a subject for intellectual analysis and rests within the realm of ideology. This latter dimension of the success myth is the primary focus of this book."

The Lost Life of Horatio Alger Jr

Recounts the life of the popular nineteenth-century American novelist, explains his reasons for leaving the ministry, and assesses the influence of his rags-to-riches novels

The Lost Life of Horatio Alger  Jr

Recounts the life of the popular nineteenth-century American novelist, explains his reasons for leaving the ministry, and assesses the influence of his rags-to-riches novels

Horatio Alger Jr

This brings the boy-and his plight-to the attention of a wealthy individual. In this book: The Disagreeable Woman Rupert's ambition Ragged Dick Adrift in New York

Horatio Alger Jr

Horatio Alger Jr. (1832 - 1899) was a prolific 19th-century American writer, best known for his many young adult novels about impoverished boys and their rise from humble backgrounds to lives of middle-class security and comfort through hard work, determination, courage, and honesty. His writings were characterized by the "rags-to-riches" narrative, which had a formative effect on America during the Gilded Age. All of Alger's juvenile novels share essentially the same theme, known as the "Horatio Alger myth" a teenage boy works hard to escape poverty. Often it is not hard work that rescues the boy from his fate but rather some extraordinary act of bravery or honesty. The boy might return a large sum of lost money or rescue someone from an overturned carriage. This brings the boy-and his plight-to the attention of a wealthy individual. In this book: The Disagreeable Woman Rupert's ambition Ragged Dick Adrift in New York

Cast Upon the Breakers

Known as the "lost" Alger story, Cast Upon the Breakers first appeared under a pseudonym in serial form in Argosy magazine in 1893.The tale of Rodney Ropes and his pals, who transform hard work and integrity pay off in wealth and comfort, ...

Cast Upon the Breakers

"You look like a good truthful boy. Here are ten dollars for you.""Oh, thank you, ma'am! You're a gentleman," said Mike overjoyed. "No, I don't mean that, but I hope you'll soon get a handsome husband.""My young friend, I don't care to marry, though I appreciate your good wishes. I am an old maid from principle. I am an officer of the Female Suffrage Association.""Is it a good payin' office, ma'am?" asked Mike, visibly impressed.-from "Chapter X: Mike Puts on a Uniform"It's entirely possibly that the 20th-century concept of "the American dream" would not exist without the cheerfully idealistic novels of Horatio Alger, Jr. Enormous bestsellers in their day, Alger's rags-to-riches tales nurtured the nation's faltering idealism during the economic inequities of the Gilded Age. Known as the "lost" Alger story, Cast Upon the Breakers first appeared under a pseudonym in serial form in Argosy magazine in 1893.The tale of Rodney Ropes and his pals, who transform hard work and integrity pay off in wealth and comfort, it is vintage Alger, a relic of 19th-century Americana that is still an inspiring delight in the 21st century.American writer HORATIO ALGER, JR. (1832-1899) wrote well over 100 novels, among them Ragged Dick; or, Street Life in New York (1867), Sink or Swim (1870), and Tattered Tom; or, The Story of a Street Arab (1871).

Horatio Alger Jr Collection Novels

This brings the boy-and his plight-to the attention of a wealthy individual. In this book: Grit Luck and Pluck Ragged Dick The Store Boy In Search of Treasure

Horatio Alger Jr   Collection Novels

Horatio Alger Jr. (1832 -1899) was a prolific 19th-century American writer, best known for his many young adult novels about impoverished boys and their rise from humble backgrounds to lives of middle-class security and comfort through hard work, determination, courage, and honesty. His writings were characterized by the "rags-to-riches" narrative, which had a formative effect on America during the Gilded Age. All of Alger's juvenile novels share essentially the same theme, known as the "Horatio Alger myth" a teenage boy works hard to escape poverty. Often it is not hard work that rescues the boy from his fate but rather some extraordinary act of bravery or honesty. The boy might return a large sum of lost money or rescue someone from an overturned carriage. This brings the boy-and his plight-to the attention of a wealthy individual. In this book: Grit Luck and Pluck Ragged Dick The Store Boy In Search of Treasure

Horatio Alger Jr

Horatio Alger  Jr


The Publishers Weekly

Alger . Ragged Dick ; or , Street : Life in New Alger . The Young Adventurer ; or , Tom's Trip York . By Horatio Alger , Jr. 16moj illustrated , cloth Across the Plains . By Horatio Alger , Jr. 16mo , extra , $ 1.25 . illustrated ...

The Publishers Weekly


Dime Novel Roundup

Alger Seminar ) 387-110 ( Alger , Horatio , Jr. ) , The Alger Fakes ( Alger books by Stratemeyer ) by Ralph Adimari , 349-105 ( Alger , Horatio , Jr. ) , Alger Heroes , The Merriwelis , et al . , by Ralph D. Gardner , 445-100 ( Alger ...

Dime Novel Roundup

This book includes a chronological listing of issues of the Dime Novel Roundup, which was published for over fifty years. It also features an index to the contents of the Dime Novel Roundup. .

The Publishers Trade List Annual

With sixteen full - page illustrations , by F. 0. C. DARLEY . Small 4to . Cloth extra , black and gold , inlaid centre ....... 2 00 ALGER . - Ragged Dick ; or , Street Life in New York . By HORATIO ALGER , Jr. Illustrated , 16mo .

The Publishers  Trade List Annual


Brave and Bold 1874 By Horatio Alger

Alger secured his literary niche in 1868 with the publication of his fourth book, Ragged Dick, the story of a poor bootblack's rise to middle-class respectability. This novel was a huge success.

Brave and Bold  1874   By  Horatio Alger

Horatio Alger Jr. ( January 13, 1832 - July 18, 1899) was a prolific 19th-century American writer, best known for his many young adult novels about impoverished boys and their rise from humble backgrounds to lives of middle-class security and comfort through hard work, determination, courage, and honesty. His writings were characterized by the "rags-to-riches" narrative, which had a formative effect on America during the Gilded Age. All of Alger's juvenile novels share essentially the same theme, known as the "Horatio Alger myth" a teenage boy works hard to escape poverty. Often it is not hard work that rescues the boy from his fate but rather some extraordinary act of bravery or honesty. The boy might return a large sum of lost money or rescue someone from an overturned carriage. This brings the boy-and his plight-to the attention of a wealthy individual. Alger secured his literary niche in 1868 with the publication of his fourth book, Ragged Dick, the story of a poor bootblack's rise to middle-class respectability. This novel was a huge success. His many books that followed were essentially variations on Ragged Dick and featured casts of stock characters: the valiant hard-working, honest youth, the noble mysterious stranger, the snobbish youth, and the evil, greedy squire. In the 1870s, Alger's fiction was growing stale. His publisher suggested he tour the American West for fresh material to incorporate into his fiction. Alger took a trip to California, but the trip had little effect on his writing: he remained mired in the tired theme of "poor boy makes good." The backdrops of these novels, however, became the American West rather than the urban environments of the northeastern United States. In the last decades of the 19th century, Alger's moral tone coarsened with the change in boys' tastes. Sensational thrills were wanted by the public. The Protestant work ethic had loosened its grip on America, and violence, murder, and other sensational themes entered Alger's works. Public librarians questioned whether his books should be made available to the young. They were briefly successful, but interest in Alger's novels was renewed in the first decades of the 20th century, and they sold in the thousands. By the time he died in 1899, Alger had published around a hundred volumes. He is buried in Natick, Massachusetts. Since 1947, the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans has awarded scholarships and prizes to deserving individuals. Pen name: Carl Cantab Arthur Hamilton Caroline F. Preston Arthur Lee Putnam Julian Starr

Horatio Alger Jr

Horatio Alger  Jr


Bound to Rise 1873 By Horatio Alger

Alger secured his literary niche in 1868 with the publication of his fourth book, Ragged Dick, the story of a poor bootblack's rise to middle-class respectability. This novel was a huge success.

Bound to Rise  1873   By  Horatio Alger

Horatio Alger Jr. ( January 13, 1832 - July 18, 1899) was a prolific 19th-century American writer, best known for his many young adult novels about impoverished boys and their rise from humble backgrounds to lives of middle-class security and comfort through hard work, determination, courage, and honesty. His writings were characterized by the "rags-to-riches" narrative, which had a formative effect on America during the Gilded Age. All of Alger's juvenile novels share essentially the same theme, known as the "Horatio Alger myth" a teenage boy works hard to escape poverty. Often it is not hard work that rescues the boy from his fate but rather some extraordinary act of bravery or honesty. The boy might return a large sum of lost money or rescue someone from an overturned carriage. This brings the boy-and his plight-to the attention of a wealthy individual. Alger secured his literary niche in 1868 with the publication of his fourth book, Ragged Dick, the story of a poor bootblack's rise to middle-class respectability. This novel was a huge success. His many books that followed were essentially variations on Ragged Dick and featured casts of stock characters: the valiant hard-working, honest youth, the noble mysterious stranger, the snobbish youth, and the evil, greedy squire. In the 1870s, Alger's fiction was growing stale. His publisher suggested he tour the American West for fresh material to incorporate into his fiction. Alger took a trip to California, but the trip had little effect on his writing: he remained mired in the tired theme of "poor boy makes good." The backdrops of these novels, however, became the American West rather than the urban environments of the northeastern United States. In the last decades of the 19th century, Alger's moral tone coarsened with the change in boys' tastes. Sensational thrills were wanted by the public. The Protestant work ethic had loosened its grip on America, and violence, murder, and other sensational themes entered Alger's works. Public librarians questioned whether his books should be made available to the young. They were briefly successful, but interest in Alger's novels was renewed in the first decades of the 20th century, and they sold in the thousands. By the time he died in 1899, Alger had published around a hundred volumes. He is buried in Natick, Massachusetts. Since 1947, the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans has awarded scholarships and prizes to deserving individuals. Pen name: Carl Cantab Arthur Hamilton Caroline F. Preston Arthur Lee Putnam Julian Starr

Cast Upon the Breakers 1893 By Horatio Alger

Alger secured his literary niche in 1868 with the publication of his fourth book, Ragged Dick, the story of a poor bootblack's rise to middle-class respectability. This novel was a huge success.

Cast Upon the Breakers  1893   By  Horatio Alger

Horatio Alger Jr. ( January 13, 1832 - July 18, 1899) was a prolific 19th-century American writer, best known for his many young adult novels about impoverished boys and their rise from humble backgrounds to lives of middle-class security and comfort through hard work, determination, courage, and honesty. His writings were characterized by the "rags-to-riches" narrative, which had a formative effect on America during the Gilded Age. All of Alger's juvenile novels share essentially the same theme, known as the "Horatio Alger myth" a teenage boy works hard to escape poverty. Often it is not hard work that rescues the boy from his fate but rather some extraordinary act of bravery or honesty. The boy might return a large sum of lost money or rescue someone from an overturned carriage. This brings the boy-and his plight-to the attention of a wealthy individual. Alger secured his literary niche in 1868 with the publication of his fourth book, Ragged Dick, the story of a poor bootblack's rise to middle-class respectability. This novel was a huge success. His many books that followed were essentially variations on Ragged Dick and featured casts of stock characters: the valiant hard-working, honest youth, the noble mysterious stranger, the snobbish youth, and the evil, greedy squire. In the 1870s, Alger's fiction was growing stale. His publisher suggested he tour the American West for fresh material to incorporate into his fiction. Alger took a trip to California, but the trip had little effect on his writing: he remained mired in the tired theme of "poor boy makes good." The backdrops of these novels, however, became the American West rather than the urban environments of the northeastern United States. In the last decades of the 19th century, Alger's moral tone coarsened with the change in boys' tastes. Sensational thrills were wanted by the public. The Protestant work ethic had loosened its grip on America, and violence, murder, and other sensational themes entered Alger's works. Public librarians questioned whether his books should be made available to the young. They were briefly successful, but interest in Alger's novels was renewed in the first decades of the 20th century, and they sold in the thousands. By the time he died in 1899, Alger had published around a hundred volumes. He is buried in Natick, Massachusetts. Since 1947, the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans has awarded scholarships and prizes to deserving individuals. Pen name: Carl Cantab Arthur Hamilton Caroline F. Preston Arthur Lee Putnam Julian Starr

Digging for Gold Horatio Alger Jr

Horatio Alger Jr.(1832 - 1899), wrote over 100 poems, short stories, and novels during his lifetime, which included four adult novels and one adult novella.

Digging for Gold Horatio Alger Jr

Horatio Alger Jr.(1832 - 1899), wrote over 100 poems, short stories, and novels during his lifetime, which included four adult novels and one adult novella. He gained notoriety when his friendship with 'William Taylor Adams', a boys' author, changed Alger's interest to writing for the juvenile market. His first book for young people, "Ragged Dick, or Street Life in New York," was a huge success, securing the author's fame among the youth of America.

Alger Street

Alger Street


From Rags to Riches

A biography of Horatio Alger.

From Rags to Riches

A biography of Horatio Alger. Alger's own life was so unlike his heroes that the public would have been shocked to know about it. Offers insights into the man and his writings, the America he lived in (1834-1899), and the curious phenomenon he helped give voice to--the American dream.