Horror Comics in Black and White

A History and Catalog, 1964–2004

Horror Comics in Black and White

In 1954, the comic book industry instituted the Comics Code, a set of self-regulatory guidelines imposed to placate public concern over gory and horrific comic book content, effectively banning genuine horror comics. Because the Code applied only to color comics, many artists and writers turned to black and white to circumvent the Code’s narrow confines. With the 1964 Creepy #1 from Warren Publishing, black-and-white horror comics experienced a revival continuing into the early 21st century, an important step in the maturation of the horror genre within the comics field as a whole. This generously illustrated work offers a comprehensive history and retrospective of the black-and-white horror comics that flourished on the newsstands from 1964 to 2004. With a catalog of original magazines, complete credits and insightful analysis, it highlights an important but overlooked period in the history of comics.

The Art of George Tuska

The Art of George Tuska

The Art of George Tuska is a comprehensive look at the personal and professional life of Tuska, including his early work with the Eisner-Iger studio and his involvement with the controversial crime comics of the independent publishers Tuska worked with. The book includes extensive coverage of his definitive work on Iron Man, X-Men, Hulk, Justice League, Teen Titans, Batman, T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents, and many more. A gallery of commission artwork by George and a thorough index of his extensive body of work are also included, and each section of the book is filled with examples of original artwork and photographs, as well as sketches and previously unpublished artwork. Interviews and anecdotes from his peers and fans, plus the very personal and reflective words of George himself, make this book a testament to the tremendous influence Tuska has had on the comic book industry and his legion of fans.

The Horror Comic Never Dies

A Grisly History

The Horror Comic Never Dies

Horror comics were among the first comic books published—ghastly tales that soon developed an avid young readership, along with a bad reputation. Parent groups, psychologists, even the United States government joined in a crusade to wipe out the horror comics industry—and they almost succeeded. Yet the genre survived and flourished, from the 1950s to today. This history covers the tribulations endured by horror comics creators and the broader impact on the comics industry. The genre’s ultimate success helped launch the careers of many of the biggest names in comics. Their stories and the stories of other key players are included, along with a few surprises.

Comics through Time: A History of Icons, Idols, and Ideas [4 volumes]

A History of Icons, Idols, and Ideas

Comics through Time: A History of Icons, Idols, and Ideas [4 volumes]

Focusing especially on American comic books and graphic novels from the 1930s to the present, this massive four-volume work provides a colorful yet authoritative source on the entire history of the comics medium. • Provides historical context within individual entries that allows readers to grasp the significance of that entry as it relates to the broader history and evolution of comics • Includes coverage of international material to frame the subsets of American and British comics within a global context • Presents information that will appeal and be of use to general readers of comics and supply coverage detailed enough to be of significant value to scholars and teachers working in the field of comics

The Vampire Book

The Encyclopedia of the Undead

The Vampire Book

The Ultimate Collection of Vampire Facts and Fiction From Vlad the Impaler to Barnabas Collins to Edward Cullen to Dracula and Bill Compton, renowned religion expert and fearless vampire authority J. Gordon Melton, PhD takes the reader on a vast, alphabetic tour of the psychosexual, macabre world of the blood-sucking undead. Digging deep into the lore, myths, pop culture, and reported realities of vampires and vampire legends from across the globe, The Vampire Book: The Encyclopedia of the Undead exposes everything about the blood thirsty predator. Death and immortality, sexual prowess and surrender, intimacy and alienation, rebellion and temptation. The allure of the vampire is eternal, and The Vampire Book explores it all. The historical, literary, mythological, biographical, and popular aspects of one of the world's most mesmerizing paranormal subject. This vast reference is an alphabetical tour of the psychosexual, macabre world of the soul-sucking undead. In the first fully revised and updated edition in a decade, Dr. J. Gordon Melton (president of the American chapter of the Transylvania Society of Dracula) bites even deeper into vampire lore, myths, reported realities, and legends that come from all around the world. From Transylvania to plague-infested Europe to Nostradamus and from modern literature to movies and TV series, this exhaustive guide furnishes more than 500 essays to quench your thirst for facts, biographies, definitions, and more.

The Great Monster Magazines

A Critical Study of the Black and White Publications of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s

The Great Monster Magazines

Honorable Mention, Rondo Hatton Award “Lengthy introduction…a nice job…hitting on some of the very insignificant magazines”—Mani.com “A vein worth mining”—Scarlet “In depth…both an affectionate look back, and a scholarly study, of a period in horror history”—Scary Monsters Magazine “Includes all of the Marvel B&W mags”—Famousmonsters of filmland.com.

This is a critical overview of monster magazines from the 1950s through the 1970s. “Monster magazine” is a blanket term to describe both magazines that focus primarily on popular horror movies and magazines that contain stories featuring monsters, both of which are illustrated in comic book style and printed in black and white. The book describes the rise and fall of these magazines, examining the contributions of Marvel Comics and several other well-known companies, as well as evaluating the effect of the Comics Code Authority on both present and future efforts in the field. It identifies several sub-genres, including monster movies, zombies, vampires, sword-and-sorcery, and pulp-style fiction. The work includes several indexes and technical credits.


Horror and the Horror Film

Horror and the Horror Film

Horror films can be profound fables of human nature and important works of art, yet many people dismiss them out of hand. ‘Horror and the Horror Film’ conveys a mature appreciation for horror films along with a comprehensive view of their narrative strategies, their relations to reality and fantasy and their cinematic power. The volume covers the horror film and its subgenres – such as the vampire movie – from 1896 to the present. It covers the entire genre by considering every kind of monster in it, including the human.

Spanish Horror Film

Spanish Horror Film

An original new study of Spanish horror film.