How the Swans Came to the Lake

This new updated edition of How the Swans Came to the Lake includes much new information about recent events in Buddhist groups in America and discusses such issues as spiritual authority, the role of women, and social action.

How the Swans Came to the Lake

This new updated edition of How the Swans Came to the Lake includes much new information about recent events in Buddhist groups in America and discusses such issues as spiritual authority, the role of women, and social action.

How the Swans Came to the Lake

This new updated edition of How the Swans Came to the Lake includes much new information about recent events in Buddhist groups in America and discusses such issues as spiritual authority, the role of women, and social action.

How the Swans Came to the Lake

This new updated edition of How the Swans Came to the Lake includes much new information about recent events in Buddhist groups in America and discusses such issues as spiritual authority, the role of women, and social action.

The American Midwest

(1893); Rick Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake, rev. ed. (1992); Paul David Numrich, "How the Swans Came to Lake Michigan: The Social Organization of Buddhist Chicago," Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 39 (June 2000); ...

The American Midwest

This first-ever encyclopedia of the Midwest seeks to embrace this large and diverse area, to give it voice, and help define its distinctive character. Organized by topic, it encourages readers to reflect upon the region as a whole. Each section moves from the general to the specific, covering broad themes in longer introductory essays, filling in the details in the shorter entries that follow. There are portraits of each of the region's twelve states, followed by entries on society and culture, community and social life, economy and technology, and public life. The book offers a wealth of information about the region's surprising ethnic diversity -- a vast array of foods, languages, styles, religions, and customs -- plus well-informed essays on the region's history, culture and values, and conflicts. A site of ideas and innovations, reforms and revivals, and social and physical extremes, the Midwest emerges as a place of great complexity, signal importance, and continual fascination.

Journeys East

Dr John Henry Barrows, chairman of the Parliament, described the glittering exhibition on Lake Michigan's shores as “the most comprehensive and brilliant display of man's material ... 62 R. Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake, 120.

Journeys East

Journeys East tells the story of the twentieth century's encounters between East and West by exploring the lives of many of the most fascinating scientists, intellectuals, artists, and spiritual seekers of our time.

American Transcendentalism and Asian Religions

See Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake 61 ff.; see also Suzuki, Zen 342, 344. 243. See, for instance, James Russell Lowell's review of Henry Thoreau's A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers, in Massachusetts Quarterly Review 3 ...

American Transcendentalism and Asian Religions

The first major study since the 1930s of the relationship between American Transcendentalism and Asian religions, and the first comprehensive work to include post-Civil War Transcendentalists like Samuel Johnson, this book is encyclopedic in scope. Beginning with the inception of Transcendentalist Orientalism in Europe, Versluis covers the entire history of American Transcendentalism into the twentieth century, and the profound influence of Orientalism on the movement--including its analogues and influences in world religious dialogue. He examines what he calls "positive Orientalism," which recognizes the value and perennial truths in Asian religions and cultures, not only in the writings of major figures like Thoreau and Emerson, but also in contemporary popular magazines. Versluis's exploration of the impact of Transcendentalism on the twentieth-century study of comparative religions has ramifications for the study of religious history, comparative religion, literature, politics, history, and art history.

Luminous Passage

Fields , How the Swans Came to the Lake , 129 . 14. Kenneth K. Tanaka , " Epilogue : The Colors and Contours of American Buddhism , " in Prebish and Tanaka , Faces of Buddhism , 297. Also see Tweed , American Encounter , 133-56 . 15.

Luminous Passage

In Luminous Passage a well-known Buddhologist and longtime observer of Buddhism in the United States presents the first comprehensive scholarly study of American Buddhism in nearly two decades. Charles S. Prebish revisits the expanding frontier of the fastest growing religion in North America and describes its historical development, its diversity, and the significance of this ancient tradition at century's end. More than anything else, this is a book about American Buddhist communities (sanghas) and about life within those communities. Prebish considers various Buddhist practices, rituals, and liturgies, as well as the ways these communities have confronted the changing American spiritual landscape. In profiling several different sanghas Prebish reveals the ways that Buddhism is being both reinvented and Westernized. He includes the first exploration of the American Buddhist "cybersangha," a community that has emerged from recent developments in information-exchange technology, and discusses the growing community of "scholar-practitioners." The interactions of Buddhist identities that are related to ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, social engagement, and the healing professions are also examined. This book fully captures the vibrancy and importance of Buddhism in American religious life today. Finally, Prebish appraises the state of Buddhism at the millennium. Placing the development of American Buddhism squarely in the midst of the religion's general globalization, he argues for an ecumenical movement which will embrace Buddhist communities worldwide.

American Buddhism

Rick Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake: A Narrative History of Buddhism in America, revised and updated edition (Boston and London: Shambhala, 1986), 74. Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake, xiii. Philip C. Almond, The British ...

American Buddhism

This is the first scholarly treatment of the emergence of American Buddhist Studies as a significant research field. Until now, few investigators have turned their attention to the interpretive challenge posed by the presence of all the traditional lineages of Asian Buddhism in a consciously multicultural society. Nor have scholars considered the place of their own contributions as writers, teachers, and practising Buddhists in this unfolding saga. In thirteen chapters and a critical introduction to the field, the book treats issues such as Asian American Buddhist identity, the new Buddhism, Buddhism and American culture, and the scholar's place in American Buddhist Studies. The volume offers complete lists of dissertations and theses on American Buddhism and North American dissertations and theses on topics related to Buddhism since 1892.

Apparitions of Asia

Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake 205. 8. Fields cites James as “an early and important influence” for Suzuki: “James had classified the various elements of mystical experience; in the same way, Suzuki categorized satori” (How the ...

Apparitions of Asia

Apparitions of Asia traces a literary intimacy between the U.S. and East Asia that spans the twentieth century. Commercial and political bridges generated transpacific literary alliances, and Park analyzes American bards who capitalized on these ties and interrogates the price of such intimacies in the work of Asian American poets.

Yoga Journal

HOW THE SWANS CAME TO THE LAKE— A NARRATIVE HISTORY OF BUDDHISM IN AMERICA by Rick Fields. Shambhala Publications, Boulder, 1981. Softcover, 397 pages. $8.95. By. Francesca. Hampton. W. hen His Holiness the Karmapa, one of the highest ...

Yoga Journal

For more than 30 years, Yoga Journal has been helping readers achieve the balance and well-being they seek in their everyday lives. With every issue,Yoga Journal strives to inform and empower readers to make lifestyle choices that are healthy for their bodies and minds. We are dedicated to providing in-depth, thoughtful editorial on topics such as yoga, food, nutrition, fitness, wellness, travel, and fashion and beauty.

The Oxford Handbook of Religion and the American News Media

Rick Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake: A Narrative History of Buddhism in the United States (Boulder, CO: Shambhala Publications, 1992), 126–27. 8. Tweed, The American Encounter with Buddhism, 32. 9.

The Oxford Handbook of Religion and the American News Media

Whether the issue is the rise of religiously inspired terrorism, the importance of faith based NGOs in global relief and development, or campaigning for evangelical voters in the U.S., religion proliferates in our newspapers and magazines, on our radios and televisions, on our computer screens and, increasingly, our mobile devices. Americans who assumed society was becoming more and more secular have been surprised by religions' rising visibility and central role in current events. Yet this is hardly new: the history of American journalism has deep religious roots, and religion has long been part of the news mix. Providing a wide-ranging examination of how religion interacts with the news by applying the insights of history, sociology, and cultural studies to an analysis of media, faith, and the points at which they meet, The Oxford Handbook of Religion and the American News Media is the go-to volume for both secular and religious journalists and journalism educators, scholars in media studies, journalism studies, religious studies, and American studies. Divided into five sections, this handbook explores the historical relationship between religion and journalism in the USA, how religion is covered in different media, how different religions are reported on, the main narratives of religion coverage, and the religious press.

Zen Master Who

Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese Zen in the West For this section I primarily drew upon several volumes mentioned above: most notably How the Swans Came to the Lake and The Faces ofBuddhism in America. For an overview of Chinese Buddhism ...

Zen Master Who

Zen Master Who? is the first-ever book to provide a history of Zen's arrival in North America, surveying the shifts and challenges to Zen as it finds its Western home. With the exception of parts of Rick Field's How the Swans Came to the Lake, there has been no previous attempt to write this chronicle. James Ishmael Ford begins by tracing Zen's history in Asia, looking at some of Zen's most seminal figures--the Sixth Ancestor Huineng, Dogen Zenji (the founder of the Soto Zen school), Hakuin Ekaku (the great reformer of the Rinzai koan way), and many others--and then outlines the state of Zen in North America today. Clear-eyed and even-handed, Ford shows us the history and development of the institution of Zen--both its beauty and its warts. Ford also outlines the many subtle differences in teachings, training, ordination, and transmission among schools and lineages. This book will aid those looking for a Zen center or a teacher, but who may not know where to start. Suggesting what might be possible, skillful, and fruitful in our communities, it will also be of use to those who lead the Zen centers of today and tomorrow.

Tibet to Texas

Fields , How the Swans Came to the Lake , 280 . Chapter 3 1. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra : Web site , www.kagyu.org/ karmapa / kar / kar021html , “ How the Karmapa's Lineage Came to the West , " part 1 , 1998 , 1-2 . 2.

Tibet to Texas


The New Buddhism

Rick Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake: A Narrative History of Buddhism in America, rev. ed. (Boston: Shambhala, 1986), p. 2 3o. i 7. Ken McLeod, "The Three- Year Retreat, "in Buddhist America: Centers, Retreats, Practices, ed.

The New Buddhism

In our multicultural society, faiths formerly seen as exotic have become attractive alternatives for many people seeking more satisfying spiritual lives. This is especially true of Buddhism, which is the focus of constant media attention--thanks at least in part to celebrity converts, major motion pictures, and the popularity of the Dalai Lama. Following this recent trend in the West, author James Coleman argues that a new and radically different form of this ancient faith is emerging. The New Buddhism sheds new light on this recent evolution of Buddhist practice in the West. After briefly recounting the beginnings and spread of Buddhism in the East, Coleman chronicles its reinterpretation by key Western teachers in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, ranging from the British poet Sir Edwin Arnold to the Beat writer Alan Watts. Turning to the contemporary scene, he finds that Western teachers have borrowed liberally from different Buddhist traditions that never intersect in their original contexts. Men and women practice together as equals; ceremonies and rituals are simpler, more direct, and not believed to have magical effects. Moreover, the new Buddhism has made the path of meditation and spiritual awakening available to everyone, not just an elite cadre of monks. Drawing on interviews with noted teachers and lay practitioners, as well as a survey completed by members of seven North American Buddhist centers, Coleman depicts the colorful variety of new Buddhists today, from dilettantes to devoted students and the dedicated teachers who guide their spiritual progress. He also details the problems that have arisen because of some Western influences--especially with regard to gender roles, sex, and power. Exploring the appeal of this exotic faith in postmodern society and questioning its future in a global consumer culture, The New Buddhism provides a thorough and fascinating guide to Western Buddhism today.

Pilgrimage in the Marketplace

... the United States titled How the Swans Came to the Lake. Fields takes his title from the quotation cited at the start of this chapter, made by the Sixteenth Karmapa (the senior figure in the Tibetan Buddhist Kargyupa lineage) who, ...

Pilgrimage in the Marketplace

The study of pilgrimage often centres itself around miracles and spontaneous populist activities. While some of these activities and stories may play an important role in the emergence of potential pilgrimage sites and in helping create wider interest in them, this book demonstrates that the dynamics of the marketplace, including marketing and promotional activities by priests and secular interest groups, create the very consumerist markets through which pilgrimages become established and successful – and through which the ‘sacred’ as a category can be sustained. By drawing on examples from several contexts, including Japan, India, China, Vietnam, Europe, and the Muslim world, author Ian Reader evaluates how pilgrimages may be invented, shaped, and promoted by various interest groups. In so doing he draws attention to the competitive nature of the pilgrimage market, revealing that there are rivalries, borrowed ideas, and alliances with commercial and civil agencies to promote pilgrimages. The importance of consumerism is demonstrated, both in terms of consumer goods/souvenirs and pilgrimage site selection, rather than the usual depictions of consumerism as tawdry disjunctions on the ‘sacred.’ As such this book reorients studies of pilgrimage by highlighting not just the pilgrims who so often dominate the literature, but also the various other interest groups and agencies without whom pilgrimage as a phenomenon would not exist.

Mindful Work

Swans. Came. to. the. Lake. MORE THAN A DECADE before I sat with Janice Marturano in a conference room in Minneapolis, patiently following my breath, I sat under a Bodhi tree in Bodh Gaya, India, learning how to meditate.

Mindful Work

A mindful revolution is reshaping the workplace. The world's most dynamic businesspeople are using mindfulness to become happier and more fulfilled at work - and more successful. In Mindful Work, New York Times business reporter David Gelles explains how mindful managers are using meditation, yoga and other mindfulness techniques to boost leadership, reduce stress and improve health. Featuring insights from revitalised employees, high-level managers at global companies and meditation masters, Mindful Work is an inspirational guide to the upsurge in mindfulness among companies as diverse as Google, Facebook and General Mills. Blending timeless insights and modern-day management theory, Gelles explains the practical benefits of the mindfulness boom, and offers a programme for changing the way we work - a change that will make us less stressed, more focused and happier.

America s Alternative Religions

2. The National Survey of Religious Identification, conducted by the City College of New York Graduate Center between 1989 and 1990. Cited in Rick Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake, 3rd ed. (Boston: Shambhala, 1992), 424. 3.

America s Alternative Religions

This is a source of reliable information on the most important new and alternative religions covering history, theology, impact on the culture, and current status. It includes a chapter on the Branch Davidians.

Mind of Winter

Rick Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake (Boulder, Colo.: Shambhala Press. 1981), p. 69. Hereafter cited as Fields, Swans. 7. Quoted in Welbon, Nirvana, p. 167. 8. Quoted in ibid., p. 165. 9. Fields, Swans, p. 42. 10. Ibid., p. 86.

Mind of Winter

Bevis addresses the most puzzling and least studied aspect of Wallace Stevens’ poetry: detachment. Stevens’ detachment, often associated by readers with asceticism, bareness, or withdrawal, is one of the distinguishing and pervasive characteristics of Stevens’ poetic work. Bevis agues that this detachment is meditative and therefore experiential in origin. Moreover, the meditative Stevens of spare syntax and clear image is in constant tension with the romantic, imaginative Stevens of dazzling metaphors and exuberant flight. Indeed, for Bevis, Stevens is a poet not of imagination and reality, but of imagination and reality, but of imagination and meditation in relation to reality.

The Rights of Nature

... Ecology and Religion in History (New York, 1974), 91-113; and Lewis W. Moncrief, "The Cultural Basis of Our Environmental Crisis," Science 170 (Oct. 30, 1970), 508-512. 89. Rick Fields, How the Swans Came to the Lake: A Narrative ...

The Rights of Nature

Charting the history of contemporary philosophical and religious beliefs regarding nature, Roderick Nash focuses primarily on changing attitudes toward nature in the United States. His work is the first comprehensive history of the concept that nature has rights and that American liberalism has, in effect, been extended to the nonhuman world. “A splendid book. Roderick Nash has written another classic. This exploration of a new dimension in environmental ethics is both illuminating and overdue.”—Stewart Udall “His account makes history ‘come alive.’”—Sierra “So smoothly written that one almost does not notice the breadth of scholarship that went into this original and important work of environmental history.”—Philip Shabecoff, New York Times Book Review “Clarifying and challenging, this is an essential text for deep ecologists and ecophilosophers.”—Stephanie Mills, Utne Reader

Buddhism in America

Rick Fields's book, How the Swans Came to the Lake, played an important role in opening American Buddhism up to historical inquiry. In an early edition of Swans, Fields recounted a conversation he had in the course of his research with ...

Buddhism in America

Over the past half century in America, Buddhism has grown from a transplanted philosophy to a full-fledged religious movement, rich in its own practices, leaders, adherents, and institutions. Long favored as an essential guide to this history, Buddhism in America covers the three major groups that shape the tradition—an emerging Asian immigrant population, native-born converts, and old-line Asian American Buddhists—and their distinct, yet spiritually connected efforts to remake Buddhism in a Western context. This edition updates existing text and adds three new essays on contemporary developments in American Buddhism, particularly the aging of the baby boom population and its effect on American Buddhism's modern character. New material includes revised information on the full range of communities profiled in the first edition; an added study of a second generation of young, Euro-American leaders and teachers; an accessible look at the increasing importance of meditation and neurobiological research; and a provocative consideration of the mindfulness movement in American culture. The volume maintains its detailed account of South and East Asian influences on American Buddhist practices, as well as instances of interreligious dialogue, socially activist Buddhism, and complex gender roles within the community. Introductory chapters describe Buddhism's arrival in America with the nineteenth-century transcendentalists and rapid spread with the Beat poets of the 1950s. The volume now concludes with a frank assessment of the challenges and prospects of American Buddhism in the twenty-first century.

Vows

I went back to the index of How the Swans Came to the Lake. In that long list of names surely someone had made a clean break, letting the church door close behind him without a second guess—as I liked to believe I had.

Vows

Profiling mid-twentieth-century Boston as a time in which devout families routinely provided children for a life of religious service to the Catholic church, the son of a former priest and nun describes how his parents met while ministering to the inner-city poor and fought to continue serving in the priesthood after their marriage. Reprint. 35,000 first printing.