How to Fix South Africa s Schools

As we have come to expect from Jansen, there are no complicated theories, not difficult to implement solutions -- just lots of common sense!

How to Fix South Africa s Schools

South Africa has an education crisis, despite the fact that the government spends the biggest slice of its budget on education, more than any other African country. And yet the crisis persists. Jansen and Blank looked at South African schools that work, in spite of adverse conditions -- schools in poor communities, schools with overcrowded classrooms, schools in both rural and urban environments -- and have drawn out the practical strategies that make them successful. 19 short films (included on DVD or available for streaming or download in digital editions) let you visit these schools and understand in the words of their principals, teachers and learners what makes them succeed. Then take look at the 10 key strategies identified and see how to implement them in other schools to effect transformation. As we have come to expect from Jansen, there are no complicated theories, not difficult to implement solutions -- just lots of common sense!

Great South African Teachers

At a time when newspapers are full of the woes of the South African education system and stories of teachers who let the children in their classes down, this book shows that this is not the whole picture; it is a celebration of heroic ...

Great South African Teachers

At a time when newspapers are full of the woes of the South African education system and stories of teachers who let the children in their classes down, this book shows that this is not the whole picture; it is a celebration of heroic teachers who have struggled against great odds to give their students a chance of success. Great South African Teachers celebrates the massive contribution of remarkable teachers, both past and present, working in South African schools. The stories, sent in by over 100 South Africans in response to advertisements placed in the Sunday Times, pay tribute to teachers who have changed lives through their passion for their subject, their dedication to the dignity of the teaching profession, and above all their determination to see the children in their classes succeed. The contributions reflect the full range of South African schools -- rich schools, poor schools, white schools under apartheid, black schools under apartheid, urban schools and rural schools, schools today and schools in the past. And the contributors come from varied backgrounds: privileged children exposed to the realities of apartheid South Africa through their teachers, poor children motivated to work to break the bonds of poverty, angry children and shy children, bright children stretched to achieve their full potential and others taught the value of hard work in the pursuit of success. Jonathan Jansen, assisted by Lihlumelo Toyana and Nangamso Koza, introduces the collection of contributions with a thought-provoking commentary on the lessons to be learnt from the tributes. Jansen identifies seven types of inspiring teacher, showing how each type works differently to bring out the best in the children in their charge. Great South African Teachers thanks our inspiring teachers and hopes to motivate the next generation of teachers to dedicate themselves to changing lives, to changing the future. All the royalties from this book go towards pre-service teacher bursaries at universities in South Africa. The first recipient of a bursary funded by the royalties from this book is currently studying for his Bachelor of Education degree at the University of the Free State. He will be the first graduate in his family.

The Toxic Mix

He gives anecdotal evidence of several schools and individual teachers who are getting it right, leaving the reader with hope for the future. This book will speak to parents, teachers and anyone concerned about the future of the country.

The Toxic Mix

"Shocking findings show that South African learners are consistently underachieving, counting not only amongst the worst in the world, but often amongst the worst in Africa. Education policy expert Graeme Bloch states that 60-80% of our schools are dysfunctional. They produce barely literate and numerate learners and Bloch believes the country is headed for a national education crisis. He identifies the toxic mix of factors that are causing this crisis, taking government and teachers to task for not performing as they should and highlighting the socio-economic challenges that many learners face. But Bloch doesn't leave it at that - he offers solutions to turn the situation around. He gives anecdotal evidence of several schools and individual teachers who are getting it right, leaving the reader with hope for the future. This book will speak to parents, teachers and anyone concerned about the future of the country. It is a powerful call to action"--Publisher's website.

We Need to Talk

In this collection of articles previously published in The Times Jansen highlights the issues that confront our country -- the issues we need to talk about.

We Need to Talk

Ways of speaking can help heal or they can provoke; they can inflame passions or settle nerves.' Professor Jonathan Jansen is fast becoming a household name in South Africa, for his critical and at times inconvenient voice. In this collection of articles previously published in The Times Jansen highlights the issues that confront our country -- the issues we need to talk about. With humour, humility, occasional anger and a good dose of common sense Jansen discusses education, race and identity, the state of our nation, leadership and even sport. When asked what the secret of his controversial columns is, he answers, 'A good column upsets half of your readers; the secret is that it should be a different half each time.' Jansen takes his inspiration from a diverse group of people -- statesmen, teachers, students, children and everyday South Africans he meets -- and introduces us to them through these stories to bring us a vision of the South Africa we can build, if only we pull together and work to heal the wounds of the past. A book to make you stop and think ... and then talk about his ideas around the dinner table, in the staffroom, in the classroom or on the bus. All the royalties from this book will go to the No Student Hungry campaign at the University of the Free State.

Letters to My Children

In this book, Jansen explains his thinking behind his wildly popular Twitter campaign and shares the first 160 Tweets with his readers.

Letters to My Children

It started as advice to his own two children entering adulthood, it spread to his students at the University of the Free State and now tens of thousands of his followers of Twitter and Facebook wait for Jonathan Jansen's words of wisdom every day. Each day Jansen (@JJ_UFS) writes a Letter to my children -- a nugget of advice on life, love and becoming a compassionate, thinking human being. Jansen has become South Africa's moral barometer in a time when leadership seems to be sorely lacking in many areas of our country which explains why this project has struck such a chord with South Africans young and old alike. Jansen talks to young people using new media but continues to give them good old fashioned advice about how to conduct their lives as strong and caring citizens who live life to the fullest. In this book, Jansen explains his thinking behind his wildly popular Twitter campaign and shares the first 160 Tweets with his readers. The Tweets range in subject from politics, to love and relationships, to being a student and ensuring that you question the status quo. They include the following examples: condoms break; never under any circumstances become a politician; choose public service instead ; here is the secret to dealing with peer pressure--choose the right peers; go to university to screw-up; how else will you learn?

South African Schooling The Enigma of Inequality

Education triple Cocktail: System-wide education reform in South Africa. ... What
do we know about teaching and learning in South African primary schools? ...
How to fix South Africa's schools: Lessons from schools that work (1st ed.).

South African Schooling  The Enigma of Inequality

This volume brings together many of South Africa’s leading scholars of education and covers the full range of South African schooling: from financing and policy reform to in-depth discussions of literacy, numeracy, teacher development and curriculum change. The book moves beyond a historical analysis and provides an inside view of the questions South African scholars are now grappling with: Are there different and preferential equilibria we have not yet thought of or explored, and if so what are they? In practical terms, how does one get to a more equitable distribution of teachers, resources and learning outcomes? While decidedly local, these questions resonate throughout the developing world. South Africa today is the most unequal country in the world. The richest 10% of South Africans lay claim to 65% of national income and 90% of national wealth. This is the largest 90-10 gap in the world, and one that is reflected in the schooling system. Two decades after apartheid it is still the case that the life chances of most South African children are determined not by their ability or the result of hard-work and determination, but instead by the colour of their skin, the province of their birth, and the wealth of their parents. Looking back on almost three decades of democracy in South Africa, it is this stubbornness of inequality and its patterns of persistence that demands explanation, justification and analysis. "This is a landmark book on basic education in South Africa, an essential volume for those interested in learning outcomes and their inequality in South Africa. The various chapters present conceptually and empirically sophisticated analyses of learning outcomes across divisions of race, class, and place. The book brings together the wealth of decades of research output from top quality researchers to explore what has improved, what has not, and why." Prof Lant Pritchett, Harvard University “There is much wisdom in this collection from many of the best education analysts in South Africa. No surprise that they conclude that without a large and sustained expansion in well-trained teachers, early childhood education, and adequate school resources, South Africa will continue to sacrifice its people’s future to maintaining the privileges of the few.” Prof Martin Carnoy, Stanford University "Altogether, one can derive from this very valuable volume, if not an exact blueprint for the future, then certainly at least a crucial and evidence-based itinerary for the next few steps.” Dr Luis Crouch, RTI

Education in a New South Africa

The toxic mix: What's wrong with South Africa's schools and how to fix it.
Tafelberg: Cape Town. Bobda, A. S. (1991). Does Pronunciation Matter? in L.W.
Lanham, et al. (eds), Getting the message in South Africa: Intelligibility,
readability, ...

Education in a New South Africa

This collection presents new investigations into the role of heritage languages and the correlation between culture and language from a pedagogic and cosmopolitical point of view.

The Global Testing Culture

Bloemfontein, South Africa: University of the Free State (self-published as Vice-
Chancellor and Rector). Jansen, J. & Blank, M. (2014) How to Fix South Africa's
Schools. Johannesburg: Bookstorm. Jansen, J. & Taylor, N. (2003) Educational ...

The Global Testing Culture

The past thirty years have seen a rapid expansion of testing, exposing students worldwide to tests that are now, more than ever, standardized and linked to high-stakes outcomes. The use of testing as a policy tool has been legitimized within international educational development to measure education quality in the vast majority of countries worldwide. The embedded nature and normative power of high-stakes standardized testing across national contexts can be understood as a global testing culture. The global testing culture permeates all aspects of education, from financing, to parental involvement, to teacher and student beliefs and practices. The reinforcing nature of the global testing culture leads to an environment where testing becomes synonymous with accountability, which becomes synonymous with education quality. Underlying the global testing culture is a set of values identified from the increasing literature on world culture. These include: education as a human right, academic intelligence, faith in science, decentralization, and neoliberalism. Each of these values highlights different aspects of the dialogue in support of high-stakes standardized testing. The wide approval of these values and their ability to legitimate various aspects of high-stakes testing reinforces the taken-for-granted notion that such tests are effective and appropriate education practices. However, a large body of literature emphasizes the negative unintended consequences – teaching to the test, reshaping the testing pool, the inequitable distribution of school resources and teachers’ attention, and reconstructing the role of the student, teacher, and parent – commonly found when standardized, census-based tests are combined with high-stakes outcomes for educators or students. This book problematizes this culture by providing critical perspectives that challenge the assumptions of the culture and describe how the culture manifests in national contexts. The volume makes it clear that testing, per se, is not the problem. Instead it is how tests are administered, used or misused, and linked to accountability that provide the global testing culture with its powerful ability to shape schools and society and lead to its unintended, undesirable consequences.

Song for Sarah

Song for Sarah pays tribute to beloved South African Professor Jonathan Jansen's mother, and to all mothers who raise families and build communities in trying circumstances.

Song for Sarah

Song for Sarah pays tribute to beloved South African Professor Jonathan Jansen's mother, and to all mothers who raise families and build communities in trying circumstances. Jansen offers this endearing praise song to contradict vulgar stereotypes of Cape Flats mothers.

Sexual Orientation Gender Identity and Schooling

Understanding and addressing homophobia in schools: a view from teachers.
South African Journal of Education, 32(3), 307–318. Bloch, G. (2009). The toxic
mix: What's wrong with South Africa's schools and how to fix it. Cape Town, South
 ...

Sexual Orientation  Gender Identity  and Schooling

'Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Schooling' brings together contributions from a diverse group of researchers, policy analysts, and education advocates from around the world to synthesize the practice and policy implications of research on sexual orientation, gender identity, and schooling.

Leapfrogging Africa

Education Rights in Independent Schools (Basic Education Rights Handbook), p.
352–371. bit.ly/3gnB6ql ... Can a Public -Private Partnership Improve Liberia's
Schools? bit.ly/3c4u1HO (26.05.20). ... How to fix South Africa's schools. Lessons
 ...

Leapfrogging Africa

In this study, we look at the potential for development leaps in Africa in three key sectors that provided the basis for socioeconomic development around the world: health, education and agriculture. Advances in these sectors increase the human capital, create jobs and economic opportunities and have a positive influence on each other. Healthy and well-fed children can learn better; hygiene and better medical care diminish infant mortality, which reduces the desire for a large number of children; education for women promotes gender equality and causes birth rates to fall further. This creates a population structure under which the economy can grow particularly well: a demographic dividend becomes possible.

Oor Bokdrolletjies En Rosyntjies

Toe Prof. Jonathan Jansen 'n kind was, het sy ma 'n spreekwoord gehad wat hom bygebly het: My kind, bokdrolletjies is nou eenmaal nie rosyntjies, al lyk dit baie dieselfde. Moet nooit die twee deurmekaar kry nie.

Oor Bokdrolletjies En Rosyntjies

Toe Prof. Jonathan Jansen 'n kind was, het sy ma 'n spreekwoord gehad wat hom bygebly het: My kind, bokdrolletjies is nou eenmaal nie rosyntjies, al lyk dit baie dieselfde. Moet nooit die twee deurmekaar kry nie.

Making Love in a War Zone

The context is the University campus in Bloemfontein, the City of Roses, the Mississippi of South Africa. Rural, agricultural, insular, religious and conservative, this is not a place for breaking out.

Making Love in a War Zone

Can racism and intimacy co-exist? Can love and friendship form and flourish across South Africa's imposed colour lines? Who better to engage on the subject of hazardous liaisons than the students Jonathan Jansen served over seven years as Vice Chancellor of the University of the Free State, in South Africa. The context is the University campus in Bloemfontein, the City of Roses, the Mississippi of South Africa. Rural, agricultural, insular, religious and conservative, this is not a place for breaking out. But over the years, Jansen observed shifts in campus life and noticed more and more openly interracial friendships and couples, and he began having conversations with these students with burning questions in mind. Ten interracial couples tell their stories of love and friendship in their own words, with a focus on how these students experience the world of interracial relationships, and how flawed, outdated laws and customs set limits on human relationships, and the long shadow they cast on learning, living and loving on university campuses to this day.

We Need to Act

The articles in this collection, previously published in The Times, focus on education and the social realities of South African society. Jansen by turn horrifies us, inspires us and reminds us of the power of individual action.

We Need to Act

'I believe that citizen action is vitally necessary as we come out of the heady days of post-apartheid euphoria.' Professor Jonathan Jansen has become a trusted commentator on the state of South Africa -- reminding us of our past and asking citizens to leave their comfort zones and contribute to righting the wrongs of our society. Why should we get involved? Jansen gives seven compelling reasons: If ordinary citizens do nothing, we face even greater social instability in the light of stubborn unemployment and crises in the poorest of schools. If we do nothing we become part of the narrative of hopelessness. Without our action, millions of marginalised people could be doomed. If we do nothing we fail to demonstrate to the next generation how to live full lives. We must serve to compensate for the wrongs of our shared past. We must give back once we have been able to move ahead. We must take our places in the long chain of activists who have over centuries opposed poverty, illiteracy, government and gangs to give us this tender young democracy to work with. The articles in this collection, previously published in The Times, focus on education and the social realities of South African society. Jansen by turn horrifies us, inspires us and reminds us of the power of individual action.

Kaapse bibliotekaris

Many don't , but Gill Connell and Cheryl McCarthy aim to fix that with A moving
child is a learning child . ... spirit PUBLISHING HOW TO JANSEN , Jonathan and
BLANK , Molly How to fix South Africa's schools : lessons from schools that work.

Kaapse bibliotekaris

Issues for Nov. 1957- include section: Accessions. Aanwinste, Sept. 1957-

Lied Vir Sarah

Lied vir Sarah bring hulde aan Suid Afrika se gunstelling Professor Jonathan Jansen se ma, en aan alle ma's wat onder moelike omstandighede gesinne grootmaak en gemeenskappe bou.

Lied Vir Sarah

Lied vir Sarah bring hulde aan Suid Afrika se gunstelling Professor Jonathan Jansen se ma, en aan alle ma's wat onder moelike omstandighede gesinne grootmaak en gemeenskappe bou. Jansen bied hierdie deerniswekkende lofsang aan om vulgêre stereotipes van Kaapse Vlakte-ma's te weerspreek.

Child and Youth Misbehaviour in South Africa

Maree ( 2000 : 4 ) identifies the following main causes of crime in South African
schools : involvement in gang activities ... Lack of discipline is a common problem
that has not changed since the arrival of the new democracy in South Africa .

Child and Youth Misbehaviour in South Africa

Undergraduate students in criminology, specialising in child and youth misbehaviour, juvenile delinquency and youth offenders/offences; child and youth practitioners and juvenile spouses in the private sector; NGOs and government.

South Africa Past Present and Future

... were expanded and new target groups were reached through programmes
such as labour-intensive road repair programmes. ... In accordance with the
principles of the RDP and in an effort to improve conditions for all South Africans,
some significant advances have ... from 31 per cent to 63 per cent, while 1,700
schools and 497 clinics were connected (Eastern Province Herald, 10 February
1999).

South Africa  Past  Present and Future

The authors offer a framework for understanding contemporary South African society and its economy, together with its development policies, in the light of its past.

The Economist

The Economist May 12th 2012 Middle East and Africa 57 NAIROBI change
among the young unemployed , Google has also pepped ... Two days before ings
in the higher courts of Ghana , for in had to take out to repair and improve the
elections , Mr Bouteflika said ... Every month of delay is schools have built
promised new class The South African National Roads reckoned to cost it
another 300m rand .

The Economist


Gaffney s Local Government in South Africa

125 968 ( informal ) East London is home to Mercedes Benz of South Location :
974 km from Johannesburg , 1 080 km Africa ( Pty ) Ltd ... 1 Harbour and air links
with all major centres in South Africa , Educational institutions : 15 Pre - primary
Schools , East London forms the ... R400 000 ; Reservoir inspection & repair -
R100 000 ; Situated at the mouth of the Buffalo River on South Fire hydrant /
value ...

Gaffney s Local Government in South Africa