Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems

Within this framework, human impacts on marine fisheries and ecosystems have accelerated through time and expanded geographically as human populations grew, extraction and distribution technologies improved, and increasingly global ...

Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems

Archaeological data now show that relatively intense human adaptations to coastal environments developed much earlier than once believed-more than 125,000 years ago. With our oceans and marine fisheries currently in a state of crisis, coastal archaeological sites contain a wealth of data that can shed light on the history of human exploitation of marine ecosystems and marine conservation principles. This groundbreaking volume, the first global survey of these topics, brings together leading researchers working in coastal areas around the world to address the links between archaeology, history, marine ecology, and fisheries management. In eleven case studies from the Americas, Pacific Islands, North Sea, the Caribbean, Europe, and Africa, they cover diverse marine ecosystems ranging from kelp forests to coral reefs and mangroves, reaching into deep history to discover how humans interacted with and impacted these aquatic environments. Utilizing a variety of multidisciplinary analyses and data sets, together they demonstrate the power of archaeology and other historical disciplines to improve our understanding of contemporary environmental problems.

A Companion to Global Environmental History

24; J. Erlandson and T. Rick, “Archaeology, Marine Ecology, and Human Impacts on Marine Environments,” in T. Rick and J. Erlandson (eds.), Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective, Berkeley, University of ...

A Companion to Global Environmental History

The Companion to Global Environmental History offers multiple points of entry into the history and historiography of this dynamic and fast-growing field, to provide an essential road map to past developments, current controversies, and future developments for specialists and newcomers alike. Combines temporal, geographic, thematic and contextual approaches from prehistory to the present day Explores environmental thought and action around the world, to give readers a cultural, intellectual and political context for engagement with the environment in modern times Brings together environmental historians from around the world, including scholars from South Africa, Brazil, Germany, and China

Human Impacts on Seals Sea Lions and Sea Otters

L. Jones 1992 Evolution of Marine Mammal Hunting: A View from the California and Oregon Coasts. ... Rick, T. C., and J. M. Erlandson (editors) 2008 Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective.

Human Impacts on Seals  Sea Lions  and Sea Otters

For more than ten thousand years, Native Americans from Alaska to southern California relied on aquatic animals such as seals, sea lions, and sea otters for food and raw materials. Archaeological research on the interactions between people and these marine mammals has made great advances recently and provides a unique lens for understanding the human and ecological past. Archaeological research is also emerging as a crucial source of information on contemporary environmental issues as we improve our understanding of the ancient abundance, ecology, and natural history of these species. This groundbreaking interdisciplinary volume brings together archaeologists, biologists, and other scientists to consider how archaeology can inform the conservation and management of pinnipeds and other marine mammals along the Pacific Coast.

Before the UN Sustainable Development Goals

Two opposing concepts play a critical role in modern thinking about human impact on marine life. ... 42 Torben C. Rick and Jon Erlandson, “Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems,” in Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A ...

Before the UN Sustainable Development Goals

Before the UN Sustainable Development Goals enables professionals, scholars, and students engaged with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to develop a richer understanding of the legacies and historical complexities of the policy fields behind each goal. Each of the seventeen chapters tells the decades- or centuries-old backstory of one SDG and reveals the global human connections, governance tools and frameworks, and the actors involved in past efforts to address sustainable development challenges. Collectively, the seventeen chapters build a historical latticework that reveals the multiple and often interwoven sources that have shaped the challenges later encompassed in the SDGs. Engaging and insightfully written, the book's chapters are authored by international experts from multiple disciplines. The book is an indispensable resource and a vital foundation for understanding the past's indelible footprint on our contemporary sustainable development challenges.

Prehistoric Marine Resource Use in the Indo Pacific Regions

Human impacts on ancient marine ecosystems: A global perspective. Berkeley: University of California Press. Rick, T.C., J.M. Erlandson, T.J. Braje, J.E. Estes, M.H. Graham, and R.L. Vellanoweth. 2008. Historical ecology and human ...

Prehistoric Marine Resource Use in the Indo Pacific Regions

Although historic sources provide information on recent centuries, archaeology can contribute longer term understandings of pre-industrial marine exploitation in the Indo-Pacific region, providing valuable baseline data for evaluating contemporary ecological trends. This volume contains eleven papers which constitute a diverse but coherent collection on past and present marine resource use in the Indo-Pacific region, within a human-ecological perspective. The geographical focus extends from Eastern Asia, mainly Japan and Insular Southeast Asia (especially the Philippines) to the tropical Pacific (Micronesia, Melanesia, and Polynesia) and outlying sites in coastal Tanzania (Indian Ocean) and coastal California (North Pacific). The volume is divided thematically and temporally into four parts: Part 1, Prehistoric and historic marine resource use in the Indo-Pacific Region; Part 2, Specific marine resource use in the Pacific and Asia; Part 3, Marine use and material culture in the Western Pacific; and Part 4, Modern marine use and resource management.

Marine Historical Ecology in Conservation

Biogeosciences 7, 585–619. Redman, C. L. (1999) Human Impact on Ancient Environments. University of Arizona Press, Tucson, AZ. Rick, T. C., and Erlandson, J. M. (2008) Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective.

Marine Historical Ecology in Conservation

"This volume provides a blueprint for managing the challenges of ocean conservation using marine historical ecology--an area of study evolving as societies confront ocean ecosystems that are being drastically altered by human activity. Applying the practice of historical ecology developed in terrestrial environments, Marine Historical Ecology guides the creation of historical baselines for marine species and ecosystems in order to inform and improve conservation and management efforts"--Provided by publisher.

Human Dispersal and Species Movement

Science 291(5509): 1748–1753. Anderson, A. 2008. Short and sometimes sharp: human impacts on marine resources in the archaeology and history of South Polynesia. In Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective, ed.

Human Dispersal and Species Movement

A unique, interdisciplinary and up-to-date treatment exploring human migration and its role in creating novel ecosystems over the long term.

Stressors in the Marine Environment

Stabilizing properties of a high biomass benthic community in a fluctuating ecosystem. ... Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services. Frontiers in Ecology and ... Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A ...

Stressors in the Marine Environment

A multitude of direct and indirect human influences have significantly altered the environmental conditions, composition, and diversity of marine communities. However, understanding and predicting the combined impacts of single and multiple stressors is particularly challenging because observed ecological feedbacks are underpinned by a number of physiological and behavioural responses that reflect stressor type, severity, and timing. Furthermore, integration between the traditional domains of physiology and ecology tends to be fragmented and focused towards the effects of a specific stressor or set of circumstances. This novel volume summarises the latest research in the physiological and ecological responses of marine species to a comprehensive range of marine stressors, including chemical and noise pollution, ocean acidification, hypoxia, UV radiation, thermal and salinity stress before providing a perspective on future outcomes for some of the most pressing environmental issues facing society today. Stressors in the Marine Environment synthesises the combined expertise of a range of international researchers, providing a truly interdisciplinary and accessible summary of the field. It is essential reading for graduate students as well as professional researchers in environmental physiology, ecology, marine biology, conservation biology, and marine resource management. It will also be of particular relevance and use to the regulatory agencies and authorities tasked with managing the marine environment, including social scientists and environmental economists.

Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries

FItzpatrick, S.M., Keegan, W.F., and Sealey, K.S. (2008) Human impacts on marine environments in the West Indies during the middle to late Holocene. In Rick, T. C. and Erlandson, J. M., eds., Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems.

Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries

Inspired by the work of the renowned fisheries scientist Daniel Pauly, this book provides a detailed overview of ecosystem-based management of fisheries. It explores the complex and interdisciplinary nature of the subject by bringing together contributions from some of the world's leading fisheries scientists, managers and conservationists. Combining both research reviews and opinion pieces, and reflecting the breadth of Pauly's influence within the field, the book illustrates the range of issues associated with the implementation of the ecosystem approach and the challenge of long-term sustainability. Topics covered include global biodiversity, the impact of human actions on marine life, the implications for economic and social systems and the role of science in communicating and shaping ocean policy to preserve resources for the future. This book provides a complete and essential overview for advanced researchers and those just entering the field.

Sea and Land

... eds., Caribbean Marine Biodiversity: The Known and Unknown, (Lancaster, PA: DEStech Publications, 2005), 213– 43; ... Middle to Late Holocene,” in T. C. Rick and J. M. Erlandson, eds., Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A ...

Sea and Land

Sea and Land provides an in-depth environmental history of the Caribbean to ca 1850, with a coda that takes the story into the modern era. It explores the mixing, movement, and displacement of peoples and the parallel ecological mixing of animals, plants, microbes from Africa, Europe, elsewhere in the Americas, and as far away as Asia. It examines first the arrival of Native American to the region and the environmental transformations that followed. It then turns to the even more dramatic changes that accompanied the arrival of Europeans and Africans in the fifteenth century. Throughout it argues that the constant arrival, dispersal, and mingling of new plants and animals gave rise to a creole ecology. Particular attention is given to the emergence of Black slavery, sugarcane, and the plantation system, an unholy trinity that thoroughly transformed the region's demographic and physical landscapes and made the Caribbean a vital site in the creation of the modern western world. Increased attention to issues concerning natural resources, conservation, epidemiology, and climate have now made the environment and ecology of the Caribbean a central historical concern. Sea and Land is an effort to integrate that research in a new general environmental history of the region. Intended for scholars and students alike, it aims to foster both a fuller appreciation of the extent to which environmental factors shaped historical developments in the Caribbean, and the extent to which human actions have transformed the biophysical environment of the region over time. The combined work of eminent authors of environment and Latin American and Caribbean history, Sea and Land offers a unique approach to a region characterized by Edenic nature and paradisiacal qualities, as well as dangers, diseases, and disasters.

The SAGE Handbook of Environmental Change

Nitrogen in aquatic ecosystems. Ambio 31(2): 102–112. Rick T. C. and Erlandson J. M. (eds) 2008. Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective. Berkeley: University of California Press. Roberts N. 1998.

The SAGE Handbook of Environmental Change

The SAGE Handbook of Environmental Change is an extensive survey of the interdisciplinary science of environmental change, including recent debates on climate change and the full range of other natural and anthropogenic changes affecting the Earth-ocean-atmosphere system in the past, present and future. It examines the historic importance, present status and future prospects of the field over two volumes. With more than 40 chapters, the books situate the defining characteristics and key paradigms within a state-of-the-art review of the field, including its changing nature and diversity of approaches, evidence base, key theoretical arguments, resonances with other disciplines and relationships between theory, research and practice. Opening with a detailed, contextualizing essay by the editors, the work is arranged into six parts: Part One: Approaches to Understanding Environmental Change Part Two: Evidence of Environmental Change and the Geo-ecological Response Part Three: Causes, Mechanisms and Dynamics of Environmental Change Part Four: Key Issues of Human-induced Environmental Changes and Their Impacts Part Five: Patterns, Processes and Impacts of Environmental Change at the Regional Scale Part Six: Responses of People to Environmental Change and Implications for Society Global in its coverage, scientific and theoretical in its approach, the books bring together an international set of respected editors and contributors to provide an exciting, timely addition to the literature on climate change. With the subjects' interdisciplinary framework, this book will appeal to academics, researchers, postgraduates and practitioners in a variety of disciplines including, geography, geology, ecology, environmental science, archaeology, anthropology, politics and sociology.

Perspectives on Oceans Past

Short and sometimes sharp: Human impacts on marine resources in the archaeology and history of south Polynesia. In T. C. Rick & J. M. Erlandson (Eds.), Human impacts on ancient marine ecosystems: A global perspective (pp. 21–43).

Perspectives on Oceans Past

Marine environmental history analyses the changing relationships between human societies and marine natural resources over time. This is the first book which deals in a systematic way with the theoretical backgrounds of this discipline. Major theories and methods are introduced by leading scholars of the field. The book seeks to encapsulate some of the major novelties of this fascinating new discipline and its contribution to the management, conservation and restoration of marine and coastal ecosystems as well as the cultural heritages of coastal communities in different parts of the world.

New Zealand and the Sea

9 Jon M. Erlandson and Torben C. Rick, 'Archaeology, Marine Ecology and Human Impacts on Marine Environments', in Torben C. Rick and Jon M. Erlandson (eds), Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems, University of California Press, ...

New Zealand and the Sea

As a group of islands in the far south-west Pacific Ocean, New Zealand has a history that is steeped in the sea. Its people have encountered the sea in many different ways: along the coast, in port, on ships, beneath the waves, behind a camera, and in the realm of the imagination. While New Zealanders have continually altered their marine environments, the ocean, too, has influenced their lives. A multi-disciplinary work encompassing history, marine science, archaeology and visual culture, New Zealand and the Sea explores New Zealand’s varied relationship with the sea, challenging the conventional view that history unfolds on land. Leading and emerging scholars highlight the dynamic, ocean-centred history of these islands and their inhabitants, offering fascinating new perspectives on New Zealand’s pasts. ‘The ocean has profoundly shaped culture across this narrow archipelago . . . The meeting of land and sea is central in historical accounts of Polynesian discovery and colonisation; European exploratory voyaging; sealing, whaling and the littoral communities that supported these plural occupations; and the mass migrant passage from Britain.’ – Frances Steel

Biol Cons 210:56–59 Duncan RP, Boyer AG, Blackburn TM (2013) Magnitude and variation of prehistoric bird ... Ann Rev Mar Sci 2:231–251 Erlandson JM, Rick TC (2008) Human impacts on ancient marine ecosystems: a global perspective.


The Archaeology of Caribbean and Circum Caribbean Farmers 6000 BC AD 1500

“Archaeology, marine ecology, and human impacts on marine environments.” In Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective, eds. T. C. Rick and J. M. Erlandson, 1–14. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.

The Archaeology of Caribbean and Circum Caribbean Farmers  6000 BC   AD 1500

Comprising 17 chapters and with a wide geographic reach stretching from the Florida Keys in the north to the Guianas in the south, this volume places a well-needed academic spotlight on what is generally considered an integral topic in Caribbean and circum-Caribbean archaeology. The book explores a variety of issues, including the introduction and dispersal of early cultivars, plant manipulation, animal domestication, dietary profiles, and landscape modifications. Tried-and-true and novel analytical techniques are used to tease out aspects of the Caribbean and circum-Caribbean database that inform the complex and often-subtle processes of domestication under varying socio-environmental conditions. Contributors discuss their findings within multiple constructs such as neolithisation, social interaction, trade, mobility, social complexity, migration, colonisation, and historical ecology. Multiple data sources are used which include but are not restricted to rock art, cooking pits and pots, stable isotopes, dental calculus and pathologies, starch grains, and proxies for past environmental conditions. Given its multi-disciplinary approaches, this volume should be of immense value to both researchers and students of Caribbean archaeology, biogeography, ethnobotany, zooarchaeology, historical ecology, agriculture, environmental studies, history, and other related fields.

Zooarchaeology in Practice

Historical ecology of the North Sea Basin: An archaeological perspective and some problems of methodology. In T. C. Rick & J. M. Erlandson (Eds.), Human impacts on ancient marine ecosystems: A global perspective (pp. 215–242).

Zooarchaeology in Practice

Zooarchaeology in Practice unites depth of treatment with broad topical coverage to advance methodological discussion and development in archaeofaunal analysis. Through case studies, historical accounts, and technical reviews authored by leading figures in the field, the volume examines how zooarchaeological data and interpretation are shaped by its methods of practice and explores the impact of these effects at varying levels of investigation. Contributing authors draw on geographically and taxonomically diverse datasets, providing instructive approaches to problems in traditional and emerging areas of methodological concern. Readers, from specialists to students, will gain an extensive, sophisticated look at important disciplinary issues that are sure to provoke critical reflection on the nature and importance of sound methodology. With implications for how archaeologists reconstruct human behavior and paleoecology, and broader relevance to fields such as paleontology and conservation biology, Zooarchaeology in Practice makes an enduring contribution to the methodological advancement of the discipline.

Encyclopedia of Modern Coral Reefs

The development of fisheries at Bornholm, Denmark (Baltic Sea) during 1880s–1914. ... Archaeology, Marine Ecology, and Human Impacts on Marine Environments. ... Human impacts on ancient marine ecosystems: a global perspective.

Encyclopedia of Modern Coral Reefs

Coral reefs are the largest landforms built by plants and animals. Their study therefore incorporates a wide range of disciplines. This encyclopedia approaches coral reefs from an earth science perspective, concentrating especially on modern reefs. Currently coral reefs are under high stress, most prominently from climate change with changes to water temperature, sea level and ocean acidification particularly damaging. Modern reefs have evolved through the massive environmental changes of the Quaternary with long periods of exposure during glacially lowered sea level periods and short periods of interglacial growth. The entries in this encyclopedia condense the large amount of work carried out since Charles Darwin first attempted to understand reef evolution. Leading authorities from many countries have contributed to the entries covering areas of geology, geography and ecology, providing comprehensive access to the most up-to-date research on the structure, form and processes operating on Quaternary coral reefs.

Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management

Possible prehistoric fishing effects on coastal marine food webs in the Gulf of Maine. Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems 29:165–85. Brodziak J, Cadrin SX, Legault CM, Murawski SA. 2008a. Goals and strategies for rebuilding New ...

Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management

"By examining a suite of over 90 indicators for nine major U.S. fishery ecosystem jurisdictions, Link and Marshak systematically track the progress the U.S. has made toward advancing ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) and making it an operational reality. Covering a range of socioeconomic, governance, environmental forcing, major pressures, systems ecology, and fisheries criteria, they evaluate progress toward EBFM in the U.S., covering a wide range of longitude, latitude, and parts of major ocean basins, representing over 10% of the world’s ocean surface area. They view progress toward the implementation of EBFM as synonymous with improved management of living marine resources in general, and highlight lessons learned from a national perspective. Although US-centric, the lessons learned are applicable for all parts of the global ocean. Though much work remains, significant progress has been made to better address many of the challenges facing the sustainable management of our living marine resources"--Publisher's description.

Humans Versus Nature

... Marine Ecology, the Coastal Migration theory, and the Peopling of the Americas,” Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 2 (2007), 161–74; Torben C. Rick and Jon M. Erlandson, eds., Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A ...

Humans Versus Nature

"This book is about the ongoing conflict between humanity and the natural environment. Over the past 200,000 years, humans have multiplied and populated the Earth. When they domesticated plants and animals and replaced foraging with agriculture and herding, they depleted natural resources, deforested the land, and caused mass extinctions. But nature has agency too, causing pandemics of plague, smallpox, measles, influenza, and other diseases and a climate change called the Little Ice Age. In recent centuries, industrialization has accelerated extinctions, deforestation, and resource depletion, even in the oceans. Twentieth-century developmentalism and mass consumerism have caused global warming and other climate changes. Environmental movements have argued for the need to mitigate the negative consequences of technological and economic change. The future of humanity and the Earth depends on choices between achieving a sustainable balance between humans and nature, carrying on as before, or learning to manage the biosphere. environment, mass extinction, domestication, agriculture, pandemic, industrialization, developmentalism, consumerism, global warming"--

Tangata Whenua

... 'Short and Sometimes Sharp: Human Impacts on Marine Resources in the Archaeology and History of South Polynesia', in Torben Rick and Jon Erlandson (eds), Human Impacts on Ancient Marine Ecosystems: A Global Perspective, ...

Tangata Whenua

Tangata Whenua: A History presents a rich narrative of the Māori past from ancient origins in South China to the twenty-first century, in a handy paperback format. The authoritative text is drawn directly from the award-winning Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History; the full text of the big hardback is available in a reader-friendly edition, ideal for students and for bedtime reading, and a perfect gift for those whose budgets do not stretch to the illustrated edition. Maps and diagrams complement the text, along with a full set of references and the important statistical appendix. Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History was published to widespread acclaim in late 2014. This magnificent history has featured regularly in the award lists: winner of the 2015 Royal Society Science Book Prize, shortlisted for the international Ernest Scott Prize, winner of the Te Kōrero o Mua (History) Award at the Ngā Kupu ora Aotearoa Māori Book Awards, and Gold in the Pride in Print Awards. The importance of this history to New Zealand cannot be overstated. Māori leaders emphatically endorsed the book, as have reviewers and younger commentators. They speak of the way Tangata Whenua draws together different strands of knowledge – from historical research through archaeology and science to oral tradition. They remark on the contribution this book makes to evolving knowledge, describing it as ‘a canvas to paint the future on’. And many comment on the contribution it makes to the growth of understanding between the people of this country.