Imaging the Southern Sky

An Amateur Astronomer's Guide

Imaging the Southern Sky

This book is not about imaging from the southern hemisphere, but rather about imaging those areas of the sky that lie south of the celestial equator. Many of the astronomical objects presented are also accessible to northern hemisphere imagers, including those in both the USA and Europe. Imaging the Southern Sky discusses over 150 of the best southern objects to image, including nebulae, galaxies, and planetaries, each one accompanied by a spectacular color image. This book also includes sections on both image capturing and processing techniques and so makes an ideal all-in-one introduction. Furthermore, because it contains an in-depth study of how to capture all the objects, many of which are rarely imaged by amateurs and professionals alike, it is also extremely useful for the more advanced imager.

Treasures of the Southern Sky

Treasures of the Southern Sky

This coffee-table book depicts famous features of the southern sky, such as the Magellanic Clouds and the Tarantula Nebula, as well as the brilliant star cluster Pismis 24, the beautiful NGC 1532-1 pair of interacting galaxies and the radiant Toby Jug Nebula.

The Great Canoes in the Sky

Starlore and Astronomy of the South Pacific

The Great Canoes in the Sky

Presenting spectacular photographs of astronomical objects of the southern sky, all taken by author Stephen Chadwick, this book explores what peoples of the South Pacific see when they look up at the heavens and what they have done with this knowledge. From wives killing brothers to emus rising out of the desert and great canoes in the sky, this book offers the perfect blend of science, tradition and mythology to bring to life the most famous sights in the heavens above the southern hemisphere. The authors place this starlore in the context of contemporary understandings of astronomy. The night sky of southern societies is as rich in culture as it is in stars. Stories, myths and legends based on constellations, heavenly bodies and other night sky phenomena have played a fundamental role in shaping the culture of pre-modern civilizations throughout the world. Such starlore continues to influence societies throughout the Pacific to this day, with cultures throughout the region – from Australia and New Zealand in the south to New Guinea and Micronesia in the north - using traditional cosmology as a means of interpreting various aspects of everyday life.

Looking Deep in the Southern Sky

Proceedings of the ESO/Australia Workshop Held at Sydney, Australia, 10–12 December 1997

Looking Deep in the Southern Sky

The idea of a joint ESO / Australia meeting on the large number of exciting new facilities that are, or will soon be, available tihne southern hemisphere arose quite naturally. In the optical and the near-infrared, the Very Large Telescope (VLT) will soon be operational. In the radio, the Australia Telescope Com pact Array is going to be upgraded to higher frequencies (20 and 100 GHz), together with an improvement in very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) facil ities. Other major facilities, such as the Large Millimetre Array and the lkT are being planned. Moreover, new deep surveys are underway in the southern hemi sphere: the southern Hubble Deep Field, the ESO Imaging Survey (BIS), pan oramic deep surveys with the UK Schmidt telescope, and the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) 2dF galaxy/QSO redshift survey in the optical; and the Parkes multibeam HI survey and Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST) Wide Field continuum survey at radio wavelengths. With all these new facilities, important progress will be made regarding important issues such as the large scale structure of the universe, the very early universe and the associated first epoch of galaxy formation. The generation of large databases, and the oppor tunity for sensitive follow-up observations in complementary wavebands, mean that coordinated radio, infrared and optical projects in the southern hemisphere are likely to become increasingly attractive and important.

Viewing and Imaging the Solar System

A Guide for Amateur Astronomers

Viewing and Imaging the Solar System

Viewing and Imaging the Solar System: A Guide for Amateur Astronomers is for those who want to develop their ability to observe and image Solar System objects, including the planets and moons, the Sun, and comets and asteroids. They might be beginners, or they may have already owned and used an astronomical telescope for a year or more. Newcomers are almost always wowed by sights such as the rings of Saturn and the moons of Jupiter, but have little idea how to find these objects for themselves (with the obvious exceptions of the Sun and Moon). They also need guidance about what equipment, besides a telescope, they will need. This book is written by an expert on the Solar System, who has had a lot of experience with outreach programs, which teach others how to make the most of relatively simple and low-cost equipment. That does not mean that this book is not for serious amateurs. On the contrary, it is designed to show amateur astronomers, in a relatively light-hearted—and math-free way—how to become serious.

New Horizons from Multi-Wavelength Sky Surveys

New Horizons from Multi-Wavelength Sky Surveys

Proceedings of the 179th Symposium of the International Astronomical Union held in Baltimore, MD, USA, August 26-30, 1996

Astronomy from Wide-Field Imaging

Proceedings of the 161st Symposium of the International Astronomical Union, Held in Potsdam, Germany, August 23–27, 1993

Astronomy from Wide-Field Imaging

H.T. MacGilLIVRAY Royal Observatory Blackford Hill Edinburgh EH9 3HJ Scotland U.K. lAU Symposium No. 161 on 'Astronomy from Wide-Field Imaging', held in Potsdam, Germany, during 23-27th August 1993, was the first conference organised by the recently-formed Working Group of lAU Commission 9 on 'Wide-Field Imaging'. This Working Group was instigated during the XXIst meeting of the General Assembly of the International Astronomical Union in Buenos Aires in 1991, and represented a merging of the former formal lAU Working Group on 'Astronomical Photography' and the informal 'Digitised Optical Sky Surveys' Working Group. Dr. Richard West was 'invited' to be Chairperson, and hence was given the daunting task of organising the Group from scratch. The very fact that the first conference after only two years was a major lAU Symposium says much about the determination and enthusiasm of Richard West to fulfilling the aims of the new Working Group. The siting of the conference in Potsdam in formerly East Germany provided an excellent opportunity to advantage from the political changes in Eastern Europe. Good access to the meeting was possible by scientists from Eastern European countries, allowing exchange of information on the very important Wide-Field facilities in both East and West, information on the rich archives of photographic plates that exist in both East and West, and allowing discussions between scientists facing very similar problems in both East and West.

Capturing the Stars

Astrophotography by the Masters

Capturing the Stars

To gaze at the stars is one thing; to capture that gaze in photographs is something else, a tantalizing scientific art that many attempt and few master. That rare mastery is on full display in this beautiful volume of space photography from thirty of the most accomplished astrophotographers in the world, both professional and amateur. Galaxies, star clusters, nebulae, and other deep-sky treasures fill the pages. Along with the marvels of the night sky--the Andromeda and Whirlpool galaxies, the Pleiades and the Praesepe, the Orion and Crab nebulae, and many more--each section features a profile of the photographer’s work, techniques, philosophy, and experiences. Compiled by the world's leading amateur astrophotographer, with an introduction to the history of space photography, this spectacular volume is an essential for every stargazer’s bookshelf.

The New Era of Wide Field Astronomy

Proceedings of a Conference Held at the Centre for Astrophysics, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, United Kingdom, 21-24 August 2000, in Association with the IAU Working Group on Sky Surveys, IAU Commission 9

The New Era of Wide Field Astronomy

Recent research in wide-field astronomy is reported in these papers from an August 2000 conference, encompassing theoretical developments as well as innovations in observational instrumentation. Advances in wide-field cosmology and extragalactic astronomy, wide-field galactic astronomy, wide-field planetary astronomy, databases and access, new telescopes and instruments, and new surveys are detailed. There is also material on the wide-field photographic legacy. Some specific topics are the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project, cosmology of the space-luminosity distribution of virialized halos, galaxy formation at high redshifts, the faint sky variability survey, saving astronomical treasures, and searching for NEOs using wide-field telescopes. Annotation copyrighted by Book News Inc., Portland, OR.

Maps of the Cosmos

Proceedings of the 216th Symposium of the International Astronomical Union Held During the IAU General Assembly XXV, Sydney, Australia, 14-17 July 2003

Maps of the Cosmos