Imagining Women s Conventual Spaces in France 1600 1800

Recent criticism has identified certain privileged spaces that early modern women made their own: the ruelle, the salon, the hearth of fairy tale-telling. Woshinsky's book definitively adds the convent to this list.

Imagining Women s Conventual Spaces in France  1600   1800

Blending history and architecture with literary analysis, this ground-breaking study explores the convent's place in the early modern imagination. The author brackets her account between two pivotal events: the Council of Trent imposing strict enclosure on cloistered nuns, and the French Revolution expelling them from their cloisters two centuries later. In the intervening time, women within convent walls were both captives and refugees from an outside world dominated by patriarchal power and discourses. Yet despite locks and bars, the cloister remained "porous" to privileged visitors. Others could catch a glimpse of veiled nuns through the elaborate grills separating cloistered space from the church, provoking imaginative accounts of convent life. Not surprisingly, the figure of the confined religious woman represents an intensified object of desire in male-authored narrative. The convent also spurred "feminutopian" discourses composed by women: convents become safe houses for those fleeing bad marriages or trying to construct an ideal, pastoral life, as a counter model to the male-dominated court or household. Recent criticism has identified certain privileged spaces that early modern women made their own: the ruelle, the salon, the hearth of fairy tale-telling. Woshinsky's book definitively adds the convent to this list.

Refugee Nuns the French Revolution and British Literature and Culture

including Mita Choudhury, Convents and Nuns In Eighteenth-Century French Politics and Culture (Ithaca, 2004); and Mumm, pp. ... 297¥316; Barbara Woshinsky, Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 1600¥1800 (Aldershot, 2010).

Refugee Nuns  the French Revolution  and British Literature and Culture

In eighteenth-century literature, negative representations of Catholic nuns and convents were pervasive. Yet, during the politico-religious crises initiated by the French Revolution, a striking literary shift took place as British writers championed the cause of nuns, lauded their socially relevant work, and addressed the attraction of the convent for British women. Interactions with Catholic religious, including priests and nuns, Tonya J Moutray argues, motivated writers, including Hester Thrale Piozzi, Helen Maria Williams, and Charlotte Smith, to revaluate the historical and contemporary utility of religious refugees. Beyond an analysis of literary texts, Moutray's study also examines nuns’ personal and collective narratives, as well as news coverage of their arrival to England, enabling a nuanced investigation of a range of issues, including nuns' displacement and imprisonment in France, their rhetorical and practical strategies to resist authorities, representations of refugee migration to and resettlement in England, relationships with benefactors and locals, and the legal status of "English" nuns and convents in England, including their work in recruitment and education. Moutray shows how writers and the media negotiated the multivalent figure of the nun during the 1790s, shaping British perceptions of nuns and convents during a time critical to their survival.

English Convents in Catholic Europe c 1600 1800

245–60. Woshinsky, Barbara R., Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: the Cloister Disclosed (Farnham: Ashgate, 2010). Young, Francis, 'Catholic Exorcism in Early Modern England: Polemic, Propaganda and Folklore', ...

English Convents in Catholic Europe  c 1600   1800

Re-orientates our understanding of English convents in exile towards Catholic Europe, contextualizing the convents within the transnational Church.

The Senses in Religious Communities 1600 1800

Titles in the series include Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800 Barbara R. Woshinsky English Women, Religion, and Textual Production, 1500–1625 Edited by Micheline White Dominican Women and Renaissance Art Ann ...

The Senses in Religious Communities  1600   1800

Offering a comprehensive analysis of newly-uncovered manuscripts from two English convents near Antwerp, this study gives unprecedented insight into the role of the senses in enclosed religious communities during the period 1600-1800. It draws on a range of previously unpublished writings-chronicles, confessions, letters, poetry, personal testimony of various kinds-to explore and challenge assumptions about sensory origins. Author Nicky Hallett undertakes an interdisciplinary investigation of a range of documents compiled by English nuns in exile in northern Europe. She analyzes vivid accounts they left of the spaces they inhabited and of their sensory architecture: the smells of corridors, of diseased and dying bodies, the sights and sounds of civic and community life, its textures and tastes; their understanding of it in the light of devotional discipline. This is material culture in the raw, providing access to a well-defined locale and the conditions that shaped sensory experience and understanding. Hallett examines the relationships between somatic and religious enclosure, and the role of the senses in devotional discipline and practice, considering the ways in which the women adapted to the austerities of convent life after childhoods in domestic households. She considers the enduring effects of habitus, in Bourdieu's terms the residue of socialised subjectivity which was (or was not) transferred to a contemplative career. To this discussion, she injects literary and cultural comparisons, considering inter alia how writers of fiction, and of domestic and devotional conduct books, represent the senses, and how the nuns' own reading shaped their personal knowledge. The Senses in Religious Communities, 1600-1800 opens fresh comparative perspectives on the Catholic domestic household as well as the convent, and on relationships between English and European philosophy, rhetorical, medical and devotional discourse.

Female Piety and the Catholic Reformation in France

Von Greyerz, K., Religion and Culture in Early Modern Europe 1500–1800 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008). ... Woshinksy, B. R., Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: Works Cited 215.

Female Piety and the Catholic Reformation in France

Hillman presents a fascinating account of the role that women played during the Catholic Reformation in France. She reconstructs the devotional practices of a network of powerful women showing how they reconciled Catholic piety with their roles as part of an aristocratic elite, challenging the view that the Catholic Reformation was a male concern.

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France

Titles in the series Imagining Women's conventual spaces in france, 16001800 The cloister disclosed Barbara R. Woshinsky Women, Imagination and the search for Truth in early Modern france Rebecca M. Wilkin english Printing, ...

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France

The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France provides the first comprehensive comparison of the printed debates in the 1500s over the superiority or inferiority of woman - the Querelle des femmes - and the dignity and misery of man. Analysing these writings side by side, Lyndan Warner reveals the extent to which Renaissance authors borrowed commonplaces from both traditions as they praised or blamed man or woman and habitually considered opposite and contrary points of view. In the law courts reflections on the virtues and vices of man and woman had a practical application-to win cases-and as Warner demonstrates, Parisian lawyers employed this developing rhetoric in family disputes over inheritance and marriage, and amplified it in the published versions of their pleadings. Tracing these ideas and modes of thinking from the writer's quill to the workshops and boutiques of printers and booksellers, Warner uses probate inventories to follow the books to the households of their potential male and female readers. Warner reveals the shifts in printed discussions of human nature from the 1500s to the early 1600s and shows how booksellers adapted the ways they marketed and sold new genres such as essays and lawyers' pleadings.

Women and Religion in the Atlantic Age 1550 1900

... B. Woshinski, Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: The Cloister Disclosed (Farnham, 2010). 4 Technically the Daughters of Charity did not form an order of nuns, but an association or 'congregation' of 'sisters'.

Women and Religion in the Atlantic Age  1550 1900

Bringing the study of early modern Christianity into dialogue with Atlantic history, this collection provides a longue durée investigation of women and religion within a transatlantic context. Taking as its starting point the work of Natalie Zemon Davis on the effects of confessional difference among women in the age of religious reformations, the volume expands the focus to broader temporal and geographic boundaries. The result is a series of essays examining the effects of religious reform and revival among women in the wider Atlantic world of Europe, the Americas, and West Africa from 1550 to 1850. Taken collectively, the essays in this volume chart the extended impact of confessional divergence on women over time and space, and uncover a web of transatlantic religious interaction that significantly enriches our understanding of the unfolding of the Atlantic World. Divided into three sections, the volume begins with an exploration of ’Old World Reforms’ looking afresh at the impact of confessional change in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries upon the lives of European women. Part two takes this forward, tracing the adaptation of European religious forms within Africa and the Americas. The third and final section explores the multifarious faces of the revival that inspired the nineteenth century missionary movement on both sides of the Atlantic. Collectively the essays underline the extent to which the development of the Atlantic World created a space within which an unprecedented series of juxtapositions, collisions, and collusions among religious traditions and practitioners took place. These demonstrate how the religious history of Europe, the Americas, and Africa became intertwined earlier and more deeply than much scholarship suggests, and highlight the dynamic nature of transatlantic cross-fertilization and influence.

Birthing Bodies in Early Modern France

Titles in the series Women, imagination and the search for truth in early Modern France Rebecca M. Wilkin imagining Women's conventual spaces in France, 16001800 the cloister disclosed Barbara R. Woshinsky the ideas of Man and Woman in ...

Birthing Bodies in Early Modern France

The pregnant, birthing, and nurturing body is a recurring topos in early modern French literature. Such bodies, often metaphors for issues and anxieties obtaining to the gendered control of social and political institutions, acquired much of their descriptive power from contemporaneous medical and scientific discourse. In this study, Kirk Read brings together literary and medical texts that represent a range of views, from lyric poets, satirists and polemicists, to midwives and surgeons, all of whom explore the popular sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century narratives of birth in France. Although the rhetoric of birthing was widely used, strategies and negotiations depended upon sex and gender; this study considers the male, female, and hermaphroditic experience, offering both an analysis of women's experiences to be sure, but also opening onto the perspectives of non-female birthers and their place in the social and political climate of early modern France. The writers explored include Rabelais, Madeleine and Catherine Des Roches, Louise Boursier, Pierre de Ronsard, Pierre Boaistuau and Jacques Duval. Read also explores the implications of the metaphorical use of reproduction, such as the presentation of literary work as offspring and the poet/mentor relationship as that of a suckling child. Foregrounded in the study are the questions of what it means for women to embrace biological and literary reproduction and how male appropriation of the birthing body influences the mission of creating new literary traditions. Furthermore, by exploring the cases of indeterminate birthing entities and the social anxiety that informs them, Read complicates the binarisms at work in the vexed terrain of sexuality, sex, and gender in this period. Ultimately, Read considers how the narrative of birth produces historical conceptions of identity, authority, and gender.

The Oxford Handbook of the Baroque

“A Solitude of Permeable Boundaries: The Abbey of La Trappe between Isolation and Engagement.” In Solitudo: Spaces, Places, and Times of Solitude in ... Woshinsky, Barbara R. Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800.

The Oxford Handbook of the Baroque

Few periods in history are so fundamentally contradictory as the Baroque, the culture flourishing from the mid-sixteenth to the mid-eighteenth centuries in Europe. When we hear the term âBaroque,â the first images that come to mind are symmetrically designed gardens in French chateaux, scenic fountains in Italian squares, and the vibrant rhythms of a harpsichord. Behind this commitment to rule, harmony, and rigid structure, however, the Baroque also embodies a deep fascination with wonder, excess, irrationality, and rebellion against order. The Oxford Handbook of the Baroque delves into this contradiction to provide a sweeping survey of the Baroque not only as a style but also as a historical, cultural, and intellectual concept. With its thirty-eight chapters edited by leading expert John D. Lyons, the Handbook explores different manifestations of Baroque culture, from theatricality in architecture and urbanism to opera and dance, from the role of water to innovations in fashion, from mechanistic philosophy and literature to the tension between religion and science. These discussions present the Baroque as a broad cultural phenomenon that arose in response to the enormous changes emerging from the sixteenth century: the division between Catholics and Protestants, the formation of nation-states and the growth of absolutist monarchies, the colonization of lands outside Europe and the mutual impact of European and non-European cultures. Technological developments such as the telescope and the microscope and even greater access to high-quality mirrors altered mankindâs view of the universe and of human identity itself. By exploring the Baroque in relation to these larger social upheavals, this Handbook reveals a fresh and surprisingly modern image of the Baroque as a powerful response to an epoch of crisis.

Female Intimacies in Seventeenth Century French Literature

Titles in the series include Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800 Barbara R. Woshinsky Birthing Bodies in Early Modern France Kirk D. Read The Ideas of Man and Woman in Renaissance France Lyndan Warner Female ...

Female Intimacies in Seventeenth Century French Literature

Examining literary discourses on female friendship and intimacy in seventeenth-century France, this study takes as its premise the view that, unlike men, women have been denied for centuries the possibility of same sex friendship. The author explores the effect of this homosocial and homopriviledged heritage on the deployment and constructions of female friendship and homoerotic relationships as thematic narratives in works by male and female writers in seventeenth-century France. The book consists of three parts: the first surveys the history of male thinkers' denial of female friendship, concluding with a synopsis of the cultural representations of female same-sex practices. The second analyzes female intimacy and homoerotism as imagined, appropriated and finally repudiated by Honoré d'Urfé's pastoral novel, L'Astrée, and Isaac de Benserade's seemingly lesbian-friendly comedy, Iphis et Iante. The third turns to unprecedented depictions of female intimate and homoerotic bonds in Madeleine de Scudéry's novel Mathilde and Charlotte-Rose de Caumont de La Force's fairy tale Plus Belle que Fée. This study reveals a female literary genealogy of intimacies between women in seventeenth-century France, and adds to the research in lesbian and queer studies, fields in which pre-eighteenth-century French literary texts are rare.

The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France

Titles in the series include: Representing Judith in Early Modern French Literature Kathleen m. llewellyn Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800 The Cloister Disclosed Barbara r. Woshinsky Publishing Women's Life ...

The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France

In its six case studies, The Dynamics of Gender in Early Modern France works out a model for (early modern) gender, which is articulated in the introduction. The book comprises essays on the construction of women: three in texts by male and three by female writers, including Racine, Fénelon, Poulain de la Barre, in the first part; La Guette, La Fayette and Sévigné, in the second. These studies thus also take up different genres: satire, tragedy and treatise; memoir, novella and letter-writing. Since gender is a relational construct, each chapter considers as well specific textual and contextual representations of men. In every instance, Stanton looks for signs of conformity to-and deviations from-normative gender scripts. The Dynamics of Gender adds a new dimension to early modern French literary and cultural studies: it incorporates a dynamic (shifting) theory of gender, and it engages both contemporary critical theory and literary historical readings of primary texts and established concepts in the field. This book emphasizes the central importance of historical context and close reading from a feminist perspective, which it also interrogates as a practice. The Afterword examines some of the meanings of reading-as-a-feminist.

Representing Judith in Early Modern French Literature

Series Editors: allyson poska, the university of Mary Washington, usa abby Zanger the study of women and gender offers ... of Gender in Early Modern France domna c. stanton Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800 The ...

Representing Judith in Early Modern French Literature

Although attention to the Book of Judith and its heroine has grown in recent years, this is the first full-length study to focus on adaptations of the Bible’s Old Testament Book of Judith across a range of literary genres written in French during the early modern era. Author Kathleen Llewellyn bases her analysis on references to Judith in a number of early modern sermons as well as the ’Judith’ texts of four early modern writers. The texts include two theatrical dramas, Le Mystère de Judith et Holofernés (c. 1500), believed to have been written by Jean Molinet, and Le Miroir des vefves: Tragédie sacrée d'Holoferne & Judith by Pierre Heyns (1596), as well as two epic poems, La Judit (1574) by Guillaume de Salluste Du Bartas, and Gabrielle de Coignard’s Imitation de la victoire de Judich (1594). Llewellyn’s goal is to see Judith as she was envisioned by early modern French writers and their readers, and to understand how the sixteenth century shaped their view of the heroine. Noting aspects of that story that were emphasized by sixteenth-century authors, as well as elements that those writers altered to suit their purposes, she also examines the ways in which writers of this era made use of Judith’s story as a means to explore interests and concerns of early modern writers, readers, and spectators. Representing Judith in Early Modern French Literature provides a deeper understanding of early modern ideas regarding the role of women, the use of exemplary stories in preaching and teaching, theories of vision, and the importance of community in Renaissance France.

Mademoiselle de Montpensier

Writings, Châteaux, and Female Self-Construction in Early Modern France Sophie Maríñez. Viala, Alain. ... Woshinsky, Barbara R. Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: The Cloister Disclosed Burlington: Ashgate, 2010.

Mademoiselle de Montpensier

Mademoiselle de Montpensier: Writings, Châteaux, and Female Self-Construction in Early Modern France examines questions of self-construction and pro-women advocacy through the memoirs, novels, and châteaux of the wealthiest unmarried woman in seventeenth-century Europe.

Dignified Retreat

He disavowed writing “novels,” disapproving of such books as frivolous and corrupting. ... he is incensed at their apparent readiness to * Barbara R. Woshinsky, Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800.

Dignified Retreat

Dignified Retreat is a panoramic study of the vibrant literary and intellectual culture that emerged in early seventeenth-century France following the devastating Wars of Religion. This was a period that not only witnessed the recovery of the country following these wars, and the emergence of a strong, 'absolutist' monarchy under the Bourbons, but also the rise and refinement of the French language and the development of a literary culture that would soon be known as French classicism. Casting his net over a wide range of writers and intellectuals, Robert A. Schneider has assembled a roster of more than 100 men and women of letters, those constituting what he calls the 'generation of 1630'. While diverse, and indeed divided between those who hewed to traditional humanism and others more attuned to 'modern' linguistic and literary developments, this cohort largely shared a commitment to a cultural renewal of France, its rise to prominence in the geopolitical arena of Europe, and the emergence of a strong centralized monarchy. They depended on both the traditional aristocracy and the king's powerful minister, Cardinal Richelieu. But despite this dependency, these writers and intellectuals maintained a degree of independence and, more significantly, were the prime movers in crucial cultural developments that are too often identified with royal initiatives. For example, the author demonstrates that the Academie francaise, founded in 1635 by Richelieu, often considered formative in French cultural history, was actually more the result of the creative initiatives of these men of letters, which the savvy Cardinal only managed to co-opt and turn to the purposes of the crown.

The Ashgate Research Companion to Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

Women Religious: The Founding of English Nunneries after the Norman Conquest. ... Woshinsky, Barbara R. Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: The Cloister Disclosed. Farnham: Ashgate, 2010.

The Ashgate Research Companion to Women and Gender in Early Modern Europe

Over the past three decades scholars have transformed the study of women and gender in early modern Europe. This Ashgate Research Companion presents an authoritative review of the current research on women and gender in early modern Europe from a multi-disciplinary perspective. The authors examine women’s lives, ideologies of gender, and the differences between ideology and reality through the recent research across many disciplines, including history, literary studies, art history, musicology, history of science and medicine, and religious studies. The book is intended as a resource for scholars and students of Europe in the early modern period, for those who are just beginning to explore these issues and this time period, as well as for scholars learning about aspects of the field in which they are not yet an expert. The companion offers not only a comprehensive examination of the current research on women in early modern Europe, but will act as a spark for new research in the field.

Writing Habits

Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1990. Woshinsky, Barbara R. Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: The Cloister Disclosed. Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2010. Wynne- Davies, Marion. “Suicide at the Elephant and Castle, ...

Writing Habits

"An in-depth examination of a significant, but marginalized, body of literature: the texts produced in English Benedictine convents on the Continent between 1600 and 1800"--

A Halfway House for Women

Professions and patriarchy. New York: Routledge. Wolf, M. (1972). Women and thefamily in rural Taiwan. Redwood City, CA: Stanford University Press. Woshinsky, B. R. (2010).Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: The ...

A Halfway House for Women

Although halfway houses have been touted for years as affirmative rehabilitation locations that ready women for life in the outside world, in this remarkable case study Gail Caputo shows how these places reinforce patterns of control and abuse that reaffirm the dependency and victimization of the inmates. Based on observations made while living and working alongside women at a halfway house within the prison system in a city in the Northeast, Caputo's analysis is anchored in the words and experiences of over a dozen women. Organized according to the progression of "levels" residents traverse during their time in the house, and the rules and behaviors associated with each level, Caputo offers a riveting look at what passes for "rehabilitation" and "reintegration" in such places, and delineates the many ways these women retain agency by resisting regulations designed to keep them in their place.

Engendering Islands

Sexuality, Reproduction, and Violence in the Early French Caribbean Ashley M. Williard ... Woshinsky, Barbara R. Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: The Cloister Disclosed. Women and Gender in the Early Modern ...

Engendering Islands

Ashley M. Williard argues that early Caribbean reconstructions of masculinity and femininity sustained occupation, slavery, and nascent ideas of race.

Educating the Catholic People

Religious Orders and Their Schools in Early Modern Italy (1500–1800) David Salomoni. Villanti, Nicolò. ... Woshinsky, Barbara J. Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: The Cloister Disclosed. New York: Routledge, 2010 ...

Educating the Catholic People

In Educating the Catholic People, Salomoni offers a new perspective on the pedagogical, institutional, and political innovations introduced in Italy by religious teaching congregations between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries.

Heroic Hearts

Sentiment, Saints, and Authority in Modern France Jennifer J. Popiel. à rendre les etats florissants, ... Woshinsky, Barbara R. Imagining Women's Conventual Spaces in France, 16001800: The Cloister Disclosed. New York: Routledge, 2016.

Heroic Hearts

"Heroic Hearts: Sentiment, Saints, and Authority in Modern France examines how young women, authorized by a widespread cultural discourse that privileged public action over love and marriage, sought to change the world"--