Imperial Lineages and Legacies in the Eastern Mediterranean

emperor? Imperial legacies in Byzantine Christian visual culture Leslie Brubaker
This is a chapter in two unequal parts. The first part addresses the issues raised
in my title directly: to what extent is it appropriate to talk about the imperial legacy
 ...

Imperial Lineages and Legacies in the Eastern Mediterranean

The comparative study of empires has traditionally been addressed in the widest possible global historical perspective with comparison of New World empires such as the Aztecs and Incas side by side with the history of imperial Rome and the empires of China and Russia in the medieval and modern periods. Surprisingly little work has been carried out focusing on the evolution of state control and imperial administration in the same territory; approached in a rigorous and historically grounded fashion over a wide extent of historical time from late antiquity to the twentieth century. The empires of Rome, Byzantium, the Ottomans and the latter-day imperialists in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, all inherited or seized and sought to develop overlapping parts of a common territorial base in the Eastern Mediterranean and all struggled to contain, control or otherwise alter the political, cultural and spiritual allegiances of the same indigenous population groups that were brought under their rule and administration. The task undertaken in Imperial Lineages and Legacies in the Eastern Mediterranean is to investigate the balance between continuity and change adopted at various historical conjunctures when new imperial regimes were established and to expose common features and shared approaches to the challenge of imperial rule that united otherwise divergent societies and imperial administrations. The work incorporates the contributions by twelve scholars, each leading practitioners in their respective fields and each contributing their particular insights on the shared theme of imperial identity and legacy in the Mediterranean World of the pagan, Christian and Muslim eras.

Imperial Legacies

In this provocative book, noted historian and commentator Jeremy Black shows how criticisms of the legacy of the British Empire are, in part, criticisms of the reality of American power today.

Imperial Legacies

Britain yesterday; America today. The reality of being top dog is that everybody hates you. In this provocative book, noted historian and commentator Jeremy Black shows how criticisms of the legacy of the British Empire are, in part, criticisms of the reality of American power today. He emphasizes the prominence of imperial rule in history and in the world today, and the selective way in which certain countries are castigated. Imperial Legacies is a wide-ranging and vigorous assault on political correctness, its language, misuse of the past, and grasping of both present and future.

World Art and the Legacies of Colonial Violence

Negotiating imperial legacies The volume revises ethical outlooks and values
within art history, as well as in fields closely related to world art, notably museum
studies.14 These trajectories correspond with approaches in critical pedagogy, ...

World Art and the Legacies of Colonial Violence

How have imperialism and its after-effects impacted patterns of cultural exchange, artistic creativity and historical/curatorial interpretation? World Art and the Legacies of Colonial Violence - comprised of ten essays by an international roster of art historians, curators, and anthropologists - forges innovative approaches to post-colonial studies, Indigenous studies, critical heritage studies, and the new museology. This volume probes the degree to which global histories of conflict, coercion and occupation have shaped art historical approaches to intercultural knowledge and representation. These debates are relevant to contemporary artists and scholars of visual, material and museological culture in their attempts to negotiate imperial and colonial legacies. Confronting the aesthetics of Abolition, Fascism and Filipino independence, and re-thinking relationships between colonised and coloniser in Cameroon, North America and East Timor, the collection brings together new readings of Primitivism and Aboriginal art as well. It features discussions of touring exhibitions, popular media, modernist paintings and sculptures, historic photographs, human remains and art installations. In addition to the critical application of phenomenology in a fresh and contemporary manner, the volume?s ?world art? perspective nurtures the possibility that intercultural ethics are relevant to the study of art, power and modernity.

Images of Imperial Legacy

When speaking and writing about the imperial legacies of the Ottoman and
Habsburg empires in South East Europe, historians will inevitably have to look
beyond the boundaries of the nation state. Yet whether they will succeed in tran-
 ...

Images of Imperial Legacy

There has been a tendency to view the history of the Balkans as essentially determined by historical legacies. Whether in scholarly literature or in popular discourse, the Ottoman or Habsburg pasts are thought to be accountable for a large variety of phenomena ranging from democratic culture (or the lack thereof) and adaptability to a free market economy to nepotism and the filthiness of public facilities. By contrast, the papers in this volume demonstrate that "legacies" are not unchanging determinants. Instead, they are very much open to constant reinterpretations and re-assessments depending on conditions in the present; they are, in short, as much shaped by the present as they are by the past. (Series: Studien zur Geschichte, Kultur und Gesellschaft Sudosteuropas - Vol. 10)

The Struggle for the Eurasian Borderlands

Imperial. legacies. The wars and revolutions of the first two decades of the
twentieth century that destroyed imperial rule have long been treated by
historians as a series of ruptures in modern European history. Borderlands broke
away from ...

The Struggle for the Eurasian Borderlands

Major new account of the Eurasian borderlands as 'shatter zones' which have generated some of the world's most significant conflicts.

British Culture and the End of Empire

CHAPTER EIGHT Imperial legacies , new frontiers : children's popular literature
and the demise of empire Kathryn Castle Enough scholarly attention has now
been paid to children's literature to establish that it played an important role in ...

British Culture and the End of Empire

The demise of the British Empire in the three decades following the Second World War is a theme that has been well traversed in studies of post-war British politics, economics and foreign relations. Yet there has been strikingly little attention to the question of how these dramatic changes in Britain's relationships with the wider world were reflected in British culture. This volume addresses this central issue, arguing that the social and cultural impact of decolonisation had as significant an effect on the imperial centre as on the colonial periphery. Far from being a matter of indifference or resigned acceptance as is often suggested, the fall of the British Empire came as a profound shock to the British national imagination, and resonated widely in British popular culture.

Fortifications Post colonialism and Power

Illustrated by case studies in Morocco, Cape Verde, São Tomé and Príncipe and Kenya, this book examines how this global but chameleonic network of forts can offer valuable insights into both the geopolitics of Empire and their ...

Fortifications  Post colonialism and Power

For more than 500 years, the Portuguese built or adapted fortifications along the coasts of Africa, Asia and South America. At a macro scale, mapping this network of power reveals a gigantic territorial and colonial project. Forts articulated the colonial and the metropolitan, and functioned as nodes in a mercantile empire, shaping early forms of capitalism, transforming the global political economy, and generating a flood of images and ideas on an unprecedented scale. Today, they can be understood as active material legacies of empire that represent promises, dangers and possibilities. Forts are marks and wounds of the history of human violence, but also timely reminders that buildings never last forever, testimonies of the fluidity of the material world. Illustrated by case studies in Morocco, Cape Verde, São Tomé and Príncipe and Kenya, this book examines how this global but chameleonic network of forts can offer valuable insights into both the geopolitics of Empire and their postcolonial legacies, and into the intersection of colonialism, memory, power and space in the postcolonial Lusophone world and beyond.

Postcolonial African Cities

Imperial legacies and postcolonial predicaments: an introduction Fawflflemis'sie
The idea for a special issue of Afiz'can [a'entltlles focusing on contemporary
African cites caught in the contradictory logics of an imperial past and
postcolonial ...

Postcolonial African Cities

The book focuses on contemporary African cities, caught in the contradiction of an imperial past and postcolonial present. The essays explore the cultural role of colonial architecture and urbanism in the production of meanings: in the inscription of power and discipline, as well as in the dynamic construction of identities. It is in these new dense urban spaces, with all their contradictions, that urban Africans are reworking their local identities, building families, and creating autonomous communities – made fragile by neo-liberal states in a globalizing world. The book offers a range of scholarly interpretations of the new forms of urbanity. It engages with issues, themes and topics including colonial legacies, postcolonial intersections, cosmopolitan spaces, urban reconfigurations, and migration which are at the heart of the continuing debate about the trajectory of contemporary African cities. The collection discusses contemporary African cities as diverse as Dar Es Salaam, Dakar, Johannesburg, Lagos and Kinshasa – offering new insights into the current state of postcolonial African cities. This was previously published as a special issue of African Identities.

Confronting the American Dream

Imperial. Legacies. Dictatorship. and. Revolution. on 19 july 1979, a massive and
particularly bloody insurrection led by the Sandinista National Liberation Front (
Frente Sandinista de Liberación Na- cional, or fsln) ousted the Somoza family ...

Confronting the American Dream

Michel Gobat deftly interweaves political, economic, cultural, and diplomatic history to analyze the reactions of Nicaraguans to U.S. intervention in their country from the heyday of Manifest Destiny in the mid–nineteenth century through the U.S. occupation of 1912–33. Drawing on extensive research in Nicaraguan and U.S. archives, Gobat accounts for two seeming paradoxes that have long eluded historians of Latin America: that Nicaraguans so strongly embraced U.S. political, economic, and cultural forms to defend their own nationality against U.S. imposition and that the country’s wealthiest and most Americanized elites were transformed from leading supporters of U.S. imperial rule into some of its greatest opponents. Gobat focuses primarily on the reactions of the elites to Americanization, because the power and identity of these Nicaraguans were the most significantly affected by U.S. imperial rule. He describes their adoption of aspects of “the American way of life” in the mid–nineteenth century as strategic rather than wholesale. Chronicling the U.S. occupation of 1912–33, he argues that the anti-American turn of Nicaragua’s most Americanized oligarchs stemmed largely from the efforts of U.S. bankers, marines, and missionaries to spread their own version of the American dream. In part, the oligarchs’ reversal reflected their anguish over the 1920s rise of Protestantism, the “modern woman,” and other “vices of modernity” emanating from the United States. But it also responded to the unintended ways that U.S. modernization efforts enabled peasants to weaken landlord power. Gobat demonstrates that the U.S. occupation so profoundly affected Nicaragua that it helped engender the Sandino Rebellion of 1927–33, the Somoza dictatorship of 1936–79, and the Sandinista Revolution of 1979–90.

Colonial Frames Nationalist Histories

A common thread throughout the essays in this volume is a focus on new loci of power that emerge either in collision with colonial power structures, or in collaboration with or those that emerge in the wake of decolonization.

Colonial Frames  Nationalist Histories

A common thread throughout the essays in this volume is a focus on new loci of power that emerge either in collision with colonial power structures, or in collaboration with or those that emerge in the wake of decolonization. While the authors recognize the presence of a larger structure of colonial hegemony, they also investigate those centers of power that emerge in the interstices of crevices of colonial power. Interdisciplinary and theoretically innovative, this book offers a global perspective on colonial and national landscapes, rewrites the master creator narrative, examines national landscapes as sites of contestation and views the globalization of processes such as archaeology beyond the boundaries of the national.

The Routledge History of Western Empires

Related to the rise of the new imperial history and its emphasis on culture and
identity, the 'spatial turn' has influenced a ... Masselos argues that Europeans
drew on previous imperial legacies in their city spaces, their architectural styles,
their ...

The Routledge History of Western Empires

The Routledge History of Western Empires is an all new volume focusing on the history of Western Empires in a comparative and thematic perspective. Comprising of thirty-three original chapters arranged in eight thematic sections, the book explores European overseas expansion from the Age of Discovery to the Age of Decolonisation. Studies by both well-known historians and new scholars offer fresh, accessible perspectives on a multitude of themes ranging from colonialism in the Arctic to the scramble for the coral sea, from attitudes to the environment in the East Indies to plans for colonial settlement in Australasia. Chapters examine colonial attitudes towards poisonous animals and the history of colonial medicine, evangelisaton in Africa and Oceania, colonial recreation in the tropics and the tragedy of the slave trade. The Routledge History of Western Empires ranges over five centuries and crosses continents and oceans highlighting transnational and cross-cultural links in the imperial world and underscoring connections between colonial history and world history. Through lively and engaging case studies, contributors not only weigh in on historiographical debates on themes such as human rights, religion and empire, and the ‘taproots’ of imperialism, but also illustrate the various approaches to the writing of colonial history. A vital contribution to the field.

Australia s Empire

A. P. Thornton, The Imperial Idea and its Enemies (London, 1959) The question
remains. The fall of the British Empire and the complexity of its legacies have
generated historical debate in Britain for half a century. Thornton's work was to be
 ...

Australia s Empire

Australia's Empire is the first collaborative evaluation of Australia's imperial experience in more than a generation. Bringing together poltical, cultural, and aboriginal understandings of the past, it argues that the legacies of empire continue to influence the fabric of modern Australian society.

Postcolonial Dublin

For hundreds of years, Ireland has been a testing ground for colonizing techniques. Postcolonial Dublin shows how perpetrators of colonialism have made use of urban planning and architecture to underscore and legitimate ideologies.

Postcolonial Dublin

For hundreds of years, Ireland has been a testing ground for colonizing techniques. Postcolonial Dublin shows how perpetrators of colonialism have made use of urban planning and architecture to underscore and legitimate ideologies. From suburban development to building facades, the conflict between nationalists and colonialists has inscribed itself on Dublin’s landscape. Andrew Kincaid illustrates how the architecture and urban planning of Dublin have been integral to debates about nationalism, modernism, and Ireland’s relationship to the rest of the world. Looking at objects such as Londonderry’s Market House, Patrick Abercrombie’s Dublin of the Future, and the urban renewal project of today’s Temple Bar, Kincaid highlights Ireland’s colonial history and the significance of architecture in the evolution of national identity. In doing so, he demonstrates how ideology “spatializes” itself. Postcolonial Dublin engages the prevailing historical representations of Irish nationalism, arguing that the evolving city reflected a debate over who would hold the reins of power. Bringing the tools of literary criticism and postcolonial theory to bear on the field of urban studies, Kincaid places Dublin at the forefront of debates over modernism, modernity, and globalization. Andrew Kincaid is assistant professor of English at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

Managing the Business of Empire

These years have seen the demise of the European colonial empires, followed
by probing autopsies, dissections of the imperial experience and scrutiny of
imperial legacies. The colonial retreat has helped to stimulate the advance of
scholarly ...

Managing the Business of Empire

This collection of essays honours David Fieldhouse, latterly Vere Harmsworth Professor of Imperial and Naval History at Cambridge and a foremost authority on the economics of the modern British Empire. The contributors include an impressive array of former students, colleagues, and friends, and their subjects range widely across the economic and administrative fields of British imperial history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reflecting many of Fieldhouse's own areas of scholarly interest, the essays address economics and business, theories of imperialism, strategies of administration, and decolonization.

Manufactured Masculinity

Imperial. Legacies. [1]. The nineteenth centurywas preeminently the European
century in world history, the period inwhich Europe wasable toimpose itswilland
itsideason the whole ofthe inhabited world. With the Europeanconquerors of
Africa ...

   Manufactured    Masculinity

'Manufactured' Masculinity should be considered essential reading for scholars in the humanities and social sciences at every level and in all parts of the academic world. It weaves together brilliantly the elements of the 'manufacture' of masculinity in the period world-famous 'public' school system for the privileged which serviced the largest empire, the world has ever known, at the zenith of its control and which has had a significant influence in the formation of the modern world. This authoritative study of the making of British imperial masculinity shines light on the period of Muscular Christianity, Social Darwinism and Militarism as meshed ideological instruments of both power and persuasion. This magisterial study reveals the extraordinary and paramount influence of games fields as the 'machine tools' in an 'industrial process' with the schools as 'workshops' containing 'cultural conveyor-belts' for the production of robust, committed and confident servants of empire, and templates for imperial reproduction in imperial possessions. Mainly on efficient 'production belt' playing fields of the privileged minds were moulded, attitudes were constructed and bodies shaped - for imperial manhood. Earlier 'manliness' was metamorphosized, morality was redefined and militarism at the high point of imperial grandeur was an adjunct. Professor Mangan outlines this unique process of cultural conditioning with a unique range of evidence and analysis. This book was published as a special double issue of the International Journal of the History of Sport.

Colonial Ambivalence Cultural Authenticity and the Limitations of Mimicry in French ruled West Africa 1914 1956

Conclusion The Politics of Cultural Authenticity and Imperial Legacies Between
1958 and 1960 nine post - colonies emerged within the colonial field that has
served as our analytical framework . The former federation of French West Africa
had ...

Colonial Ambivalence  Cultural Authenticity  and the Limitations of Mimicry in French ruled West Africa  1914 1956

Colonial Ambivalence, Cultural Authenticity, and the Limitations of Mimicry in French-Ruled West Africa, 1914-1956 offers an innovative and provocative reassessment of the history and legacies of French colonial rule in West Africa between the First World War and the late 1950s. Making critical use of postcolonial and cultural theory, James E. Genova argues that the colonizers and the colonized were locked in a struggle for authority increasingly structured by competing notions of what it meant to be French or African. This book breaks new ground by demonstrating the centrality of the cultural question in the imperial encounters between France and West Africa. It maps the emergence of the French-educated elite as a social class in French West Africa as a window into the complex relationship between agency and structural context in the making of history. A disjunction developed between decolonization and liberation in the colonial liaison of France and West Africa that left colonizers and colonized trapped in a neocolonial cultural framework actualizing Frantz Fanon's deepest fears about the postcolony.

A Companion to Border Studies

Core state interventions frequently intersect with, and often fuel, organized
violence between competing state and nationbuilding projects on the frontier,
and serve to reactivate older antagonisms rooted in imperial legacies and
religious ...

A Companion to Border Studies

A Companion to Border Studies introduces an exciting and expanding field of interdisciplinary research, through the writing of an international array of scholars, from diverse perspectives that include anthropology, development studies, geography, history, political science and sociology. Explores how nations and cultural identities are being transformed by their dynamic, shifting borders where mobility is sometimes facilitated, other times impeded or prevented Offers an array of international views which together form an authoritative guide for students, instructors and researchers Reflects recent significant growth in the importance of understanding the distinctive characteristics of borders and frontiers, including cross-border cooperation, security and controls, migration and population displacements, hybridity, and transnationalism

James G Blaine

Imperial. Legacies. It will be Mr. Blaine's strongest title to a great place in our
history that he was the American statesman of the last quarter of the nineteenth
century who most fully perceived the part that his country must play in the
Twentieth.

James G  Blaine

In James G. Blaine: Architect of Empire, author Edward P. Crapol assesses Blaine's role as an architect of empire and revisits the ambitious imperialistic goals of this two-time secretary of state. Crapol examines Blaine's pivotal role in shaping American foreign relations and looks at some of the underlying reasons why the U.S. acquired an overseas empire at the turn of the century. This text will acquaint readers with how Blaine sought to win global economic supremacy and intended to transform the U.S. into the world's number one power. The book also lends insight into Blaine's efforts to spark energetic governmental action in revitalizing the merchant marine, building a first-class navy, using the coercive tactic of reciprocity, achieving unilateral control of an isthmian canal, and creating U.S. political and economic hegemony in the hemisphere. In addition, James G. Blaine: Architect of Empire takes a serious look at Blaine the Anglophobe and anti-British nationalist who defined Great Britain as the U.S.'s primary global rival and the chief obstacle to American economic and political dominance in Latin America and the Pacific. Finally, Crapol looks at Blaine as the transitional figure who helped forge the economic expansionist mentality that underpinned the late nineteenth-century burst of imperialism. James G. Blaine is an excellent resource for scholars and students interested in America's imperial past and the figures who played key roles in America's global economic development.

Modern Political Culture in the Caribbean

Imperial Legacies: Encrustation and Liberation At the same time, a receding but
still influential culture of British imperialism defined the second form of
consciousness at large among the urban poor. In the 1960s the centuries-long
impact of ...

Modern Political Culture in the Caribbean

This contribution to the study and analysis of Caribbean politics explores the political culture of the Caribbean in order to understand the regional differences. The contributors, renowned internationally for their expertise in Caribbean studies, explore the topic from their varied cultural experiences and offer a new dimension to the study of political culture.

The Postcolonial City and Its Subjects

It provides ways of thinking about citizenship as a material and symbolic relation
of belonging articulated in the postcolonial city that is riddled simultaneously with
imperial legacies and nationalist re-inscriptions of spatial practices, as well as ...

The Postcolonial City and Its Subjects

This book considers twentieth and twenty-first century literary and cultural formations of the postcolonial city and the constitution of new subjects within it. Varma offers a reading of both historical and contemporary debates on urbanism through the filter of postcolonial fictions and the cultural fields surrounding and containing them. In particular, she presents a representational history of London, Nairobi and Bombay in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and engages three key theoretical frameworks -- the city within postcolonial theory and culture (its troubled salience in the construction of postcolonial public spheres and identities, from local, rural, ethnic/"tribal", and regional to "national", cosmopolitan and transnational subjects and spaces); postcolonial fictions as constituting a new world literary space and as a site of the articulation of contending narratives of urban space, global culture and postcolonial development; and postcolonial feminist citizenship as a universal political project challenging current neo-liberal and post neo-liberal contractions and eviscerations of public spaces and rights.