In Renaissance Florence with Leonardo

“ San Giovanni is the oldest monument in Florence , ” Leonardo explained , and there was once a Roman temple here . It's eight - sided because the number eight symbolizes a new beginning , and it's so big because baptisms took place ...

In Renaissance Florence with Leonardo

Recreates the people, places, events, and popular culture of Renaissance Florence in the time of Leonardo.

Painting in Renaissance Florence 1500 1550

... work before Vasari, found in the correspondence of Isabella d'Este in a letter of [501 from Mantua to her agent in Florence. Leonardo is described as being capable of producing a religious painting 'full of faith and sweetness'.

Painting in Renaissance Florence  1500 1550

Franklin's unprecedented examination of Vasari's work as a painter in relation to his vastly better-known writings fully illuminates these dual strands in Florentine art and offers us a clearer understanding of sixteenth-century painting in Florence than ever before." "The volume focuses on twelve painters: Perugino, Leonardo de Vinci, Piero di Cosimo, Michelangelo, Fra Bartolomeo, Ridolfo Ghirlandaio, Andrea del Sarto, Franciabigio, Rosso Fiorentino, Jacopo da Pontormo, Francesco Salviati and Giorgio Vasari."--BOOK JACKET.

Art Patronage Family and Gender in Renaissance Florence

LEONARDO DI LORENZO TORNABUONI'S ART PATRONAGE Lorenzo Tornabuoni's younger son, Bishop Leonardo, also commissioned art and, like his grandfather Giovanni, seems to have befriended and aided his chosen artist.

Art Patronage  Family  and Gender in Renaissance Florence

This book examines a Renaissance Florentine family's art patronage, even for women, inspired by literature, music, love, loss, and religion.

Republican Realism in Renaissance Florence

Leonardo Bruni would go much further along that path . The Innovations of Leonardo Bruni Salutati had sought to disguise the transgressive novelty of the symbolic rearticulation of Florence and to gloss over the coercive character of ...

Republican Realism in Renaissance Florence

In this book, Athanasios Moulakis makes available for the first time in English the important essay Discorso di Logrogno, "How to Bring Order to Popular Government," by Renaissance thinker Francesco Guicciardini. In addition to his valuable and lucid translation of the essay, Moulakis provides an engaging analysis of this important work. He shows that, far from representing a revival of ancient republicanism, the long maturation of Florentine constitutional thought - brought to fine expression by Guicciardini - points to a distinctly modern idea of the republican state. Republican Realism in Renaissance Florence is a unique and important book that will be of great value to historians and political theorists alike.

Living on the Edge in Leonardo s Florence

R. Trexler, Public Life in Renaissance Florence (New York, 1980). 11. R. Goldthwaite, Private Wealth in Renaissance Florence (Baltimore, 1968); The Building of Renaissance Florence (Baltimore, 1980); Wealth and the Demand for Art in ...

Living on the Edge in Leonardo   s Florence

"These essays on Renaissance Florence are a tonic to read, as we watch one of the great historians of the period take hold of major questions with never less than a keen intelligence and a masterly imagination."—Lauro Martines, author of April Blood: Florence and the Plot against the Medici (2003) and Strong Words: Writing and Social Strain in the Italian Renaissance (2001) "These thoughtful essays illuminate the precarious quality of life during the Italian Renaissance. They remind us of the social and personal struggles that gave birth to the period's impressive achievements."—William J. Connell, Professor of History and La Motta Chair in Italian Studies, Seton Hall University, editor of Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence

Living on the Edge in Leonardo s Florence

Five of these essays explore themes in the premodern period and delve into Italy's political, social, economic, religious, and cultural development. Among these pieces is a lucid, synoptic view of the Italian Renaissance.

Living on the Edge in Leonardo   s Florence

In Living on the Edge in Leonardo's Florence, an internationally renowned master of the historian's craft provides a splendid overview of Italian history from the Black Death to the rise of the Medici in 1434 and beyond into the early modern period. Gene Brucker explores those pivotal years in Florence and ranges over northern Italy, with forays into the histories of Genoa, Milan, and Venice. The ten essays, three of which have never before been published, exhibit Brucker's graceful intelligence, his command of the archival sources, and his ability to make history accessible to anyone interested in this place and period. Whether he is writing about a case in the criminal archives, about a citation from Machiavelli, or the concept of modernity, the result is the same: Brucker brings the pulse of the period alive. Five of these essays explore themes in the premodern period and delve into Italy's political, social, economic, religious, and cultural development. Among these pieces is a lucid, synoptic view of the Italian Renaissance. The last five essays focus more narrowly on Florentine topics, including a fascinating look at the dangers and anxieties that threatened Florence in the fifteenth century during Leonardo's time and a mini-biography of Alessandra Strozzi, whose letters to her exiled sons contain the evidence for her eventful life.

Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence

41 It is notable that recent studies of social and work relationships in Renaissance Florence , however different their ... On this text , published by G. Fumagalli , Leonardo , omo sanza lettere ( Florence , 1952 ) , pp .

Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence

Essays illustrate the ways Renaissance Florentines expressed or shaped their identities as they interacted with their society.

The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence

For a survey of this literature, see Brian Jeffrey Maxson, “Kings and Tyrants: Leonardo Bruni's Hiero in Early Renaisance Florence,” Renaissance Studies 24, no. 2 (April 2010): 190–191. For the Dialogues, see Gordon Griffiths, ...

The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence

The Humanist World of Renaissance Florence offers the first synthetic interpretation of the humanist movement in Renaissance Florence in more than fifty years.

The Laboring Classes in Renaissance Florence

Now, the humanist ideologues begin to see Florence as a whole, the unity of the city as the defender of Republican liberty surrounded by an encroaching sea of despotism.” In the Laudatio Florentinae Urbis, Leonardo Bruni applauds ...

The Laboring Classes in Renaissance Florence

The Laboring Classes in Renaissance Florence investigates the part of Renaissance history that refers to the notarial and criminal archives of Florence. The book presents the relations between the laboring classes and the ruling elite. It demonstrates the class struggle that happened in the Renaissance period. The text also describes the progress of class struggle in periods preceding the Industrial Revolution. It discusses the reforms of the political strategies, list of protests, and awareness of artisans and laborers in preindustrial milieu. Another topic of interest is the tax revolt, food riot, and rural rebels’ resistance during the Renaissance period. The section that follows describes the emergence of ethnic ghettos, impact of immigration, and distribution of population. The book will provide valuable insights for historians, students, and researchers in the field of medieval history.

Private Wealth in Renaissance Florence

Pinaccio apparently had no descendants; but Piero's line continued in Florence; Leonardo's three sons ventured abroad and met with considerable success in business; and Simone's son Matteo, reduced by political adversities, ...

Private Wealth in Renaissance Florence

The histories of six generations of the Strozzi, Gondi, Guicciardini, and Capponi families are traced from the fifteenth to the mid-sixteenth centuries by focusing on the family household as defined by the economic bonds reflected in account books. These four families were among the best known of the city's patriciate and were influential in affairs of the city. Their histories serve as case studies in seeking to determine the nature of the patrician family as a specific kind of social institution and to assess its importance in Florentine history. A concluding chapter attempts to relate the changing composition of the family to the general development of Renaissance civilization. Originally published in 1968. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Dante and Renaissance Florence

Stefano Ugo Baldassarri ( Florence : SISMEL , 2000 ) De militia , ed . Charles Calvert Bayley , in War and Society in Renaissance Florence : The ' De militia ' of Leonardo Bruni ( Toronto : University of Toronto Press , 1961 ) Opere ...

Dante and Renaissance Florence

Simon Gilson examines Dante's reception in Florence in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, when Dante was represented, commemorated and debated in all media in a wide variety of ways. Gilson pays particular attention to Dante's influence on major authors such as Boccaccio and Petrarch, on Italian humanism, and on civic identity and popular culture in Florence. Ranging across literature, philosophy and art, across languages and across social groups, Gilson's study fully illuminates for the first time Dante's central place in Italian Renaissance culture and thought.

Public Life in Renaissance Florence

Yet such spatial totalities are moral quanta as well, and it is Leonardo who describes the origins of values in spatial organizations: If you meet with anyone who is virtuous, do not drive him from you. Do him honor, so that he may not ...

Public Life in Renaissance Florence

Covering the history of Renaissance Florence from the fourteenth century to the beginnings of the Medici duchy, Richard C. Trexler traces collective ritual behavior in all its forms, from a simple greeting to the most elaborate community festival. He examines three kinds of social relationships: those between individual Florentines, those between Florentines and foreigners, and those between Florentines and God and His saints. He maintains that ritual brought life to the public world and, when necessary, reformed public life.

Leonardo the Florentine

Leonardo the Florentine


Humanism Theology and Spiritual Crisis in Renaissance Florence Giovanni Caroli s Liber dierum lucensium

Bayley, C.C., War and Society in Renaissance Florence: The De Militia of Leonardo Bruni (Toronto 1961). Becker, Marvin B. and Brucker, Gene A., 'The Arti Minori in Florentine Politics, 1342–1378', in MediaevalStudies xviii (1956), pp.

Humanism  Theology  and Spiritual Crisis in Renaissance Florence  Giovanni Caroli   s Liber dierum lucensium

This volume offers a unique glimpse into the mind of Giovanni Caroli’s powerful personal reaction to the institutional crisis regarding the required reform in the Dominican Order in the mid-fifteenth century, through a critical edition of his The Book of My Days in Lucca.

The Young Leonardo

This book, however, attempts to understand him in the context of Renaissance Florence. Larry J. Feinberg explores Leonardo's origins and the beginning of his career as an artist.

The Young Leonardo

Leonardo da Vinci is often presented as the 'transcendent genius', removed from or ahead of his time. This book, however, attempts to understand him in the context of Renaissance Florence. Larry J. Feinberg explores Leonardo's origins and the beginning of his career as an artist. While celebrating his many artistic achievements, the book illuminates his debt to other artists' works and his struggles to gain and retain patronage, as well as his career and personal difficulties. Feinberg examines the range of Leonardo's interests, including aerodynamics, anatomy, astronomy, botany, geology, hydraulics, optics, and warfare technology, to clarify how the artist's broad intellectual curiosity informed his art. Situating the artist within the political, social, cultural, and artistic context of mid- and late-fifteenth-century Florence, Feinberg shows how this environment influenced Leonardo's artistic output and laid the groundwork for the achievements of his mature works.

Leonardo da Vinci

8 Codex Madrid, 2:folio 75; Winternitz, “Musical Instruments in the Madrid Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci,” 115; Winternitz, ... “Satire and Medicine in Renaissance Florence: Leonardo da Vinci's Grotesque Drawings,” Master's thesis, ...

Leonardo da Vinci

The #1 New York Times bestseller from Walter Isaacson brings Leonardo da Vinci to life in this exciting new biography that is “a study in creativity: how to define it, how to achieve it…Most important, it is a powerful story of an exhilarating mind and life” (The New Yorker). Based on thousands of pages from Leonardo da Vinci’s astonishing notebooks and new discoveries about his life and work, Walter Isaacson “deftly reveals an intimate Leonardo” (San Francisco Chronicle) in a narrative that connects his art to his science. He shows how Leonardo’s genius was based on skills we can improve in ourselves, such as passionate curiosity, careful observation, and an imagination so playful that it flirted with fantasy. He produced the two most famous paintings in history, The Last Supper and the Mona Lisa. With a passion that sometimes became obsessive, he pursued innovative studies of anatomy, fossils, birds, the heart, flying machines, botany, geology, and weaponry. He explored the math of optics, showed how light rays strike the cornea, and produced illusions of changing perspectives in The Last Supper. His ability to stand at the crossroads of the humanities and the sciences, made iconic by his drawing of Vitruvian Man, made him history’s most creative genius. In the “luminous” (Daily Beast) Leonardo da Vinci, Isaacson describes how Leonardo’s delight at combining diverse passions remains the ultimate recipe for creativity. So, too, does his ease at being a bit of a misfit: illegitimate, gay, vegetarian, left-handed, easily distracted, and at times heretical. His life should remind us of the importance to be imaginative and, like talented rebels in any era, to think different. Here, da Vinci “comes to life in all his remarkable brilliance and oddity in Walter Isaacson’s ambitious new biography…a vigorous, insightful portrait” (The Washington Post).

Leonardo Da Vinci

The life of Leonardo da Vinci does not appear in many films; it only made it to the small screen in an Italian ... In the second installment of the game, set in Renaissance Florence, Leonardo helps the main character with his weapon ...

Leonardo Da Vinci